Yiynova 22" available this Friday.

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by thatcomicsguy, Jul 29, 2013.

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  1. alisaad619

    alisaad619 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I have a question about the Yiynova screens
    does it have touch input (like with your finger) ? because I want to use one as a second screen to write on it (in Onenote) while watching lectures or webinars on the main monitor, so I will be writing on it without looking at it all the time (like using a real paper ) (so I guess palm rejection is very important in this case)

    is that use case possible ? and what is the possible obstacles for this use case ?
     
  2. RaphK

    RaphK Pen Pal - Newbie

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    The Yiynova's do not have touch screens. That said, I have never tried them with OneNote!
     
  3. alisaad619

    alisaad619 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    so that mean it should have great palm rejection ? and if I press with my finger does it take that as input (like resistive screens )

    I'm thinking of ideal setup for online courses and lectures (since my university really taking this route and I like to learn from khan academy or coursera )
     
  4. RaphK

    RaphK Pen Pal - Newbie

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    It does not detect anything but the pen. Pressing with your finger does nothing. It does not see your palm. Pen only. :)
     
  5. alisaad619

    alisaad619 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    well that's a great news to me , then this device should make a great second screen note taking tool

    I'm researching the better option I found 22" Yiynova and the 22" Bosto Kingtee , any idea which is might be better for my use case (writing on onenote ) ?
     
  6. RaphK

    RaphK Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I have no experience with the Bosto but I have heard of lots of quality control issues. I can vouch for the fact that Panda City (the US distributor for Yiynova) has truly phenomenal customer service.
     
  7. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Yiynova now accepts DVI input?

    About time! The real alternatives to the Cintiq for studio machines are maturing well.

    Yiynova is a real company which has behaved well over the years. And while $999 is still on the expensive side, at half the price for a comparable Wacom model, it's worth paying attention to. The early user reviews are very positive.

    The user reviews for the similarly equipped Huion GT-220 aren't quite as encouraging, but it's also $100 less expensive.

    Bosto is a joke. Their customer "support" is openly abusive and they often ship faulty or broken products. I've even seen the company officials troll review sites and bully people for reporting negative user experiences. Though, when everything goes right, some people are satisfied with their Bosto tablets. It looks like Russian Roulette, however. I'd stay away from them on principle.
     
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  8. RaphK

    RaphK Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I just received an upgrade to the latest version of the 22U+IPS. I sent the old one back because it kept getting "pixel crawl" and I had to hit the autoadjust button.

    The new screen is great. So much better than the old one that it is not even funny. It sailed through every test at http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/ except for the inversion test -- slight flickers on 1 and 7b, noticeable on 3. (For comparison, my HP ZR22w flickered slightly only on 4a and 4b; my Viewsonic only on 4b).

    Font rendering is perfect. This makes me wonder whether I ever did in fact get the upgraded firmware last time, because the difference is stark.

    The pen performs exactly as it always has. No issues that I can see. I did a ruler test and a pressure test.

    Cosmetically, it is almost identical, but the build feels a bit tighter. The top buttons are flusher and crisper to the touch, not slightly wobbly.

    The OSD is different as well. More options in general.

    The table came with a CD with an 8.0 driver, which I have not yet tried (still using the older driver). Right now it also comes with two pens, each in a case with a little stand, three video cable adapters (DVI to HDMI, to VGA, and to Thunderbolt) and artist gloves. It's a dramatically more professional package than last year.
     
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  9. RaphK

    RaphK Pen Pal - Newbie

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    My Amazon review of the V3:

    I have owned the MSP19U, the MVP22Uv1, V2, and now V3.

    The V3 is a very noticeable upgrade over the V2, which in turn was a big step over the V1.

    DIFFERENCES FROM EARLIER MODELS

    I was an early adopter of the V1. The V1 suffered from the fact that the large screen was a TFT -- even close up, you would see color issues resulting from the viewing angles on a TFT screen, just because the screen was so big. There were also font rendering issues caused by the drivers for the monitor itself. I returned my V1 in favor of a V2 when that came out, because of a desire to upgrade from the TFT screen and because of the font firmware patch. Panda City generously offered to swap the monitor out originally for the firmware patch, then let me pay the difference to get an upgrade.

    The V2 added a firmware patch for the font issue, and also upgraded to an IPS panel. The panel was very good, but only offered a VGA connector. This meant that you had to use an adapter to use it on a modern video card with digital outputs such as DVI. I ran it with a DVI to VGA adapter. I still had font issues, though they were improved; it may be that the issue was around the VGA conversion. The IPS panel solved the color and angle viewing issues. The improved firmware also introduced better pen tracking particularly for slow lines.

    The firmware updates have been retroactively applied to the V1 and V2 that you can buy now, is my understanding.

    CONNECTION

    The monitor now uses a DVII connector. It is still a cable that is permanently attached at the monitor side, alas; I am running it to an extender cable with a DVII extender, and also running a USB extender. This is in anticipation of switching from the built in VESA stand (which supports a wide range of tilt, but nothing else) to a monitor arm.

    DISPLAY

    V3 now has an even better IPS panel, with improved color gamut. Out of the box, a calibration check at lagom.nl's monitor testing site showed dead-on color accuracy, sharpness, black levels, and gamma. Basically, it crushed every test but one. The only issue was on the inversion test -- slight flickers on 1 and 7b, noticeable on 3. (For comparison, my HP ZR22w flickered slightly only on 4a and 4b; my Viewsonic only on 4b).

    In comparison, the V2 flunked the sharpness test (oversharp, and there was no sharpness adjustment in the OSD), and flickered strongly on patterns 3 and 7b. It also exhibited a slight reddening on the full-screen purple test; the V3 does not. Unlike the 19U and the V1, both of which ran cool out of the box, the V3 was perfectly calibrated from the get go.

    As the V3 is a new panel, it also has a new OSD. This OSD has more or less the same options as the V2 did:

    Brightness, contrast, gamma
    Color temp, and R, G, B
    A sharpness setting rather than clock and phase (since it is digital)
    Horizontal and vertical OSD position, and language (it supports a lot of languages, too).

    The older V2, given the VGA connector, had phase, autoadjust, and horizontal and vertical offset for the screen. These don't apply with a digital connection.

    PEN AND DRAWING

    The various Yiynova models, going back to the 19U, have always had great pen tracking. There have been a few generations of pen and some firmware adjustments to pressure sensitivity, but it has likewise always been great. The V3 has 2048 levels, and no tilt support. I have no issues whatsoever with line straightness doing a ruler test. There is no "waviness" from imprecise tracking behind the screen. There is no jitter outside from that of your own hand. The tablet was perfectly calibrated all the way to the edge of the display, out of the box -- actually slightly better than the V2. I am able to draw literally to the exact corner pixels, at all four corners. If you haven't drawn on a Yiynova yet, it's basically excellent, and quite comparable to Wacom, barring tilt.

    At this point I have been through many Yiynova pens. :)

    Original 19U pen: Getting to 2048 required pressing pretty hard. Also, the rubbery "sleeve" was not the sturdiest design. I think this pen has been phased out completely now.

    v1 22U pen: I don't have it anymore, but I had to press hard though not as hard as the 19U pen. It felt "stiffer" across the board. This pen was revised based on feedback from artist Ray Frenden, and the drivers were tweaked as well, to adjust the pressure curve. These pens intriduced a whole new pen barrel, with a shiny glossy plactis for most of it and a rubberized grip area. The whole thing is rather sharpie-like, but also much sturdier than the original pen.

    New 19U style pen: Don't have to press as hard as the original. More sensitive to light strokes -- easier to make light lines with.

    V2 22U pen (P2H): best of the lot. Sensitive to light strokes, and I don't have to press anywhere near as hard to reach 2048. Now, this is of course ALSO paired with the new firmware in the tablet itself. The reduced jitter and improved tracking likely makes a difference here too.

    The new V3 has both the P2H and the new P2X pen. The P2X pen performs identically to the earlier pen, but it has a much better fit and finish; the pen no has a taper much like a traditional ink quill, bulging before the nib. This enables the part where you grip the pen to be thinner. The exterior is now a slightly tacky material that feels great. There's also a light, supposedly, to inform you of low battery, but I have never seen it come on (batteries last forever in these pens).

    All in all, the new pen is just great. Right now, the V3 comes with one of each.

    Note that pens do have some slight variation. The new P2H that came with the V3 is stiffer than the one I had with the V2; it takes more pressure to reach 2047 (max). However, it registers very soft strokes, at sensitivity around 8-15. I have two P2Xs, because I bought one standalone for the V2 when they came out. One of them is slightly more sensitive than the other -- my lightest stroke registers at single digits with one (like the P2H), and in the teens with the other. Both seem to take about the same to get to 2047.

    DRIVERS

    The box included a CD with new 8.0 drivers. They are apparently mostly for compatibility with Windows 8. I had the 5.02g drivers installed previously, and the tablet worked instantly without anything needing to be installed. But I decided to try the new drivers anyway. I am running on Windows 7, 64bit.

    I found that the 8.0 driver required me to uncheck “Supports Digital Ink” on the Info tab. Otherwise, the pen would not work unless the control panel was open and on the Pressure tab. I could sketch in the pressure tab, but if I switched tabs, I lose the pen altogether.

    I did try going into Tablet PC settings, and it showed that my main monitor (not the tablet) was the one with the pen. But I couldn’t change it to the MVP22U because that control panel would not recognize taps on the screen. It didn’t matter if Supports Digital Ink was checked or not.

    I did not have problems using the ink tools in Office.

    Mapping express keys to Common function -> POP MENU worked, but I was not able to make the pop menu work on the tablet. It worked correctly with the mouse on the other screens. If I opened it while the cursor was on the tablet, it forced my mouse to jump to one of the other screens completely, and I was unable to move the mouse to the tablet (it was like it wasn’t there). If I tried using the pen to tap it instead, any tap just closed the menu.

    The pressure sensitivity works just fine in Photoshop, Manga Studio, Inkscape, Pencil2D, and Sculptris. It works with FireAlpaca, but you need to set it up: If you go into File->Environment Setting and set "Brush Coordinate" to "Use Mouse Coordinate" instead of "Use Tablet Coordinate (recommended)" both the line and the offset are fixed.

    It did not seem to work out of the box in Sketchbook Pro. I could swear it used to, so I will have to investigate that more.

    I checked with Panda City, and they told me that 5.02g is actually recommended for Windows 7. Note that 5.02g is NOT on the CD they send, so if you run Win 7, you should download that version from their site. I will probably try reverting back and running thorough tests to see if there is any difference.

    FIT AND FINISH

    All three of the 22Us have shared the same chassis more or less. But something in the manufacturing process has clearly improved. In the V1, the buttons at the top actually had light leakage behind them. In the V2, they were slightly loose and wobbly. On the V3, they are just solid, and I see no light leakage.

    EXTRA STUFF

    The V2 came with a couple of monitor adapters. The new version comes with three: one each for HDMI, VGA, and MiniDisplayPort/Thunderbolt.

    The V3 also came with a pair of artists gloves, a pen stand, a P2X pen and a P2H pen, both with the new hard plastic case with stands (the V2 only had relatively flimsy thin plastic boxes for the pens). There are extra nibs and nib removal tools included with each, so now I have a ton of them. :)

    CUSTOMER SUPPORT

    My V2 had developed a "pixel crawl" issue over the course of almost a year of usage, where the monitor would go out of phase, and pixels seemed to "wiggle." It also seemed to regularly "forget" its correct phase settings for auto-adjust -- auto adjusting would even send it to numbers that weren't valid sometimes (outside of the 1-100 range). Talking with Panda City, we concluded it was some form of electrical interference, but could not pinpoint it. They once again offered to swap out the monitor, and once again allowed me to upgrade. I can't say enough about how phenomenal Panda City's customer support is. They are extremely attentive, and have sent me things like a new pen holder or the like when one broke.

    The V3 comes with a two year warranty where the earlier V2 came with a one year.

    All in all, I am contemplating making this my main monitor now. They really have perfected it; about all that I could wish for would be a few more hotkeys, a nicer chassis, and maybe little labels for the buttons on the front or side rather than the back.
     
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  10. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Great review!

    $1000 is still a bit steep, but I think it remains on the reasonable side of that price mountain, considering that Yiynova is offering at long last, a studio grade device which is nearly half the price of Wacom's comparable tablet.

    It's worth keeping in mind that only a year ago, options for out of the box Wacom alternatives were simply not available in any real way. It's good to see Yiynova come through with this machine.
     
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