Yet Another New Battery Technology

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Steve S, Mar 16, 2015.

  1. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  2. RT545

    RT545 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    @Steve S: you might be interested to read about the researches of the JCESR:

    This is a big research lab that was founded in 2012 for the sole purpose of researching a new battery technology that will replace lithium/ion:

    The Joint Centre for Energy Storage Research is a research hub of the department of energy. They have a funding of 120M$ and join the efforts of multiple researchers and research partners.

    One of their goal is to give a proof of concept for the end of 2017 (at the end of this year) for a battery delivering five times the energy density at one-fifth the cost of commercial batteries available in 2011, and so such a battery should reach a density of more than 1000WH/kg

    For that, they have selected for transportation a Lithium/Sulfur/Graphene based concept at the start of 2016, among all the concepts that have been studied; reading about the latest news, they seem to be confident that they can demonstrate this proof of concept at the end of the year. They also selected another interesting concept to be used for the power grid.

    More on that in the following articles:
    http://www.energyharvestingjournal....promising-successors-to-lithium-ion-batteries
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffmc...t-generation-batteries-to-succeed-lithium-ion

    And also on their website (interesting videos!):
    http://www.jcesr.org/about/
    http://www.jcesr.org/about/mission/
     
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  3. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...they have selected for transportation a Lithium/Sulfur/Graphene based concept...>>

    ...This would be great if we rode our tablets to work every morning!

    Seriously, though, thanks for the referral. One of these days, we'll have better batteries!
     
  4. RT545

    RT545 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Every research initiative today that aims to find a technology to replace Li/Ion batteries target EV (electric vehicles) and the technology developed also targets mobile phone, notebooks, tablets de facto. After all, the engineer who first invented the Tesla cars and batteries (Martin Eberhard) did it originally based on Li/Ion batteries that also powered mobile computers and today, the big batteries of the electric vehicles are still composed of thousands of Li/Ion cells that are very similar to those found in our tablets/smartphones/computers.

    The JCESR lab’s research makes no exception.

    See video by their director (Mr George Crabtree) here (he explains things quite clearly); this interview is three days old, by the way (21th september 2017) so this is quite recent.

    This research initiative has put a lot of dedication in finding the next battery technology that will replace Li/Ion and power our tablets and/or our cars:


    “After studying more than 22,500 ingredients for batteries, Energy Department researchers have settled on two prototypes they believe can surpass lithium-ion at much lower cost, the project's director announced.”

    More than 22500 ingredient tested before they selected the right prototype is quite an impressive research feat, it seems.

    So, for the next batteries that may power mobile computers, smartphone, tablets (and also cars), there may be a winner here.
     
  5. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  6. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  7. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I know that car battery awesomeness doesn't necessarily translate into high voltage laptop batteries but.., all this research can't hurt.

    It's too bad Toshiba lost it's place in the computer game.
     
  8. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    RT545 Scribbler - Standard Member

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  10. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Well shoot!

    Graphene battery tech is creeping into the Real pretty fast, with price tags and form factors you can actually use in common, practical scenarios.

    This is kind of huge. The last time we got a big bump in battery tech was with Lithium Ion and metal oxides, and that was years ago now. All we've really seen since were tweaks and refinements and manufacturing efficiencies pushed up as far as could be managed. But this is new.

    Or rather, it's taking the old chemistries and really blasting their efficiencies through the roof.

    From what I gather, the benefit of Graphene is this...

    Battery charges come from electrons being traded back and forth between different atoms, and traditional battery chemistries involved essentially taking quantities of certain element and shaping them into battery parts. Obviously. -The problem was that on the atomic level, no matter how you shape those elements, you're subject to a certain amount of chaos, so the distribution and structures on the atomic level was hard to control and tended to result in "lumpy" distributions. Down at that level, electrons, if pictured as marbles being poured into a grid, had to randomly find their ways into the holes, and the holes in the grid were unreliably shaped and distributed, and there would be lumps of crap forming all over the place as the chemistry digrades, so large amounts of potentially useful surface just ended up being wasted. -Of course, that's a terribly misleading analogy, but the reality of quantum charged hyper-spheres is pretty much impossible to visualize for us dumb monkeys, so.., marbles it is.

    Anyway, Graphene is a cheaply produced, very reliale atomic grid which can be used to regulate the structure of whatever chemicals you want to use. This means batteries aren't relying on random structures of elements and hoping for the best, but can guarantee to some degree the most efficient distribution of a substance at the atomic level. -AND it provides a rigid structure for those elements so that undesirable crystalization, "clumping" don't happen (or at least not as quickly), so the battery charge efficiency doesn't degrade as fast. More charge cycles per battery.

    So Graphene essentially allows us to put things in order and get the most efficiency out of existing chemistries, -and also to make other chemistries viable which before crystalized too fast for commercial use, (sulfer is one of these, with great electron exchange qualities, but which stopped working after just a few cycles).

    So this really does change everything. And the fact that we're seeing them for sale (!!!) and not just talked about is kind of huge. Your hot new laptop/phone/tablet just fell off the cutting edge.

    Investors in a variety of fields have got to be licking their lips right now.

    This is almost as cool a turn of events in the tech world as the White LED was when it first appeared.

    Neat-o!
     
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