X1 Yoga 4th gen (2019) discussion thread

Discussion in 'Lenovo (IBM)' started by JoeS, Jan 7, 2019.

  1. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    @Marty and @desertlap - when I started college, I was five years removed from the last moon landing, and I just KNEW I wanted to be an astrophysicist - but then advanced calculus and thermodynamics proved I was more Perry Mason than Carl Sagan...:(

    It was definitely when connected to AC (the dock) and not on battery. Even if temp spikes are possible, how does it cool back down equally as fast - that's as far as my physics ability allows me to question...o_O
     
  2. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    It actually generally speaking doesn't. As I think about @Marty theory, I'll add to it with this speculation and qualified by the fact that I haven't seen this specific system.

    So that out of the way... If Lenovo put a temp sensor right next to the voltage regulator and/or integrated in to it (like apple does) the regulator alone could heat up that fast and/or could be sending bad data to the temp sensor.

    BTW: A lot of what's here now goes back to two infamous systems in the earlier days right when new battery tech started appearing in systems. eg. not NiCad.

    Apple's Powerbook 500 and one of Toshiba's Tecra's both used new at the time NiMH batteries and both were prone to dangerous overheating and had multiple recalls on the batteries. I was indirectly connected to Apple at the time, and one outcome of all that was that Apple hired a bunch of battery engineers.

    PS: rapid heating and cool down is a function of how small these individual parts have become. Those of us of a certain age tend to think in terms of much larger objects we have experienced in real life
     
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  3. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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  4. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Aww man, I would have loved to see that! @dstrauss the astrophysicist! I'll bet we would be colonizing by Mars now....Maybe with a few lost spaceships along the way. But progress is progress. :D
     
  5. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    Back in 1977 we were right in the thick of the Apollo-Soyuz test flights and optimistically WERE headed to Mars by the 90's - now we can't even lift our own asses off the ground...:mad: yes, I am an angry baby boomer that saw the real scientific achievements of mankind stop 50 years ago...

    AND YES, I do not count the incredible improvement in computer technology as a scientific achievement - it is an engineering victory, but not the achievement of the Apollo program...
     
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  6. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Please jump into another timestream and tell yourself not become another boring lawyer (no offense @Bronsky et al. :p)—but to jump to the stars!

    The future of humanity depends on it!

    (While you're there, maybe also give young @dstrauss some pointers on which tablets he's actually going to keep. ;))
     
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  7. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    The whole Apollo program is arguably the greatest combination technical/mechanical/teamwork/engineering accomplishment of the 20th century and definitely America's shining moment IMHO.
     
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  8. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    My kids, and now my grandson, ask if landing on the moon, or building the atomic bomb in secret, were greater achievements. I always defer on the science, but point to the Apollo program as the greater achievement, possibly the greatest in human history, because it was reflective of the best of mankind, not the worst. The Manhattan Project was an equally great technical achievement, in fact some would say the science was much harder, and doubtless more critical considering the times and political climate. But it was also reflective of the destructive side of mankind, something that continues even to this day.

    Don't mean to wax dystopian or judgmental - nor cast aspersions on the great sacrifices of the American people of the World War II era - just wish we'd learn something as a species now and again.

    My apologies to all...
     
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  9. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    I want everyone to understand I am NOT judgmental about the Manhattan Project - it was an unavoidable necessity which was going to happen whether it was us, Germany, Russia or another country. Just wanted my children focusing on positive achievements in my own way.
     
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  10. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    The Manhattan project was a great achievement, but it's legacy is complicated to say the least.

    Apollo truly was about what we would hope for all us; working together on something that was about exploring and pushing the boundaries of what we are capable of as people.
     
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