Wordstar; A Writer's Word Processor

Discussion in 'Software' started by Steve S, Mar 17, 2017.

  1. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  2. Steve B

    Steve B Moderator Moderator

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    That's actually a pretty neat read. Its nice to know ol' GRRM atleast has a reason for such a crazy outdated mode of writing.
     
  3. dellaster

    dellaster Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Piers Anthony (circa 1990s, not sure now) had a special manual typewriter made (possibly Dvorak). Not a new-fangled electric typewriter, either. He swore by his method and wrote dozens of novels that way.

    David Eddings (Belgariad, et al) wrote all his millions of words in print handwriting (as opposed to cursive). On a 5"x8" memo pad, both sides of the sheet. Someone else typed it up.

    It's all in what you're used to. And it seems writers are very resistant to change in that area. Their creative flow gets set in stone as to method. ;)
     
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  4. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    A lot of writers work in Scrivener these days. Many actually enjoy using software that enhances their craft.

    Digital artist found dead in home. Details sketchy.
     
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  5. dellaster

    dellaster Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I like Scrivener. It's what I use when I fool around, pretending that I can write a novel. :cool:
     
  6. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Gosh!

    Wordstar sounds great! -I love some of the features the article describes, like the double period followed by notes which will be ignored by the final document.

    I never tried Wordstar. The disks I had with my old Apple ][ were corrupted and so I ended up a Wordperfect guy.

    Since getting into comics, I find I rarely write long stretches of work. The nature of comics is such that I tend to peck away at stories a few pages at a time, and keep loose notes on where I want to go. Most of my "original scripts" are really just collections of dozens of short .rtf files spread over multiple disks and sticks. -Writing scenes as the inspiration hits, and then drawing them shortly after. Some scenes will sit around on a hard drive for a year or more as I do the work between where I am and where the scene actually happens. Some of my most adrenalized life moments have happened when I finally get to a scene I've been planning and have to scramble to find the thing I'd written. "Did I actually write it, or did I just imagine that I did?? Yikes!" I've never lost one yet, but I have had some panicky moments. Also, losing a joke is scary. "Where is the most recent version?? This old crappy version isn't the funny one!"

    I use Abiword, (mostly because it's one of the few word processors which doesn't auto-scroll the screen as I near the bottom. Word and Open Office both make me dizzy.)

    But Abiword isn't so great for long form writing. (I have a few half-finished novels floating around). Once you get files over 50,000 words or so, I find navigation becomes a pain. Wordstar's ability to bounce around and have the software remember where you've been sounds useful.
     

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