With all its problems...would you recommend it?

Discussion in 'HP TouchSmart TM2 (Wacom)' started by herewego, Dec 1, 2010.

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  1. herewego

    herewego Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Thread title is my question:

    With all its problems (screen angles, build quality, glossy screen etc)...would you recommend it? I know there may be some bias here but I figure people who own it would know best.

    I've been doing research for a tablet pc for a few weeks now, and on paper the tm2t and its price seemed PERFECT. But as I researched and researched, those glaring problems really started to worry me.

    If I buy it, I'm going to get an exim screen protector as suggested by forum members so the glare won't be an issue. But things just as build quality and screen angles..no fix.

    I'm just a poor med student who has too much information to integrate and commit to memory (hundreds of powerpoints, pdfs, ebooks, publications etc), who would like to play some games (if I ever have time)..

    So my options are 1) buy the fully loaded tm2t right now, for ~$900 with shipping and just leave things at that or 2) take out $2k more in loans, and setup a nice desktop for gaming and a higher quality tablet pc for work related stuff.

    Also, if I were to get it, should I not get the 500 gig 7200rpm HD? I hear it fails alot? Is that the case with all the 7200 rpm options?

    As with everything in the stage of life I'm in, I want things to last so I don't mind taking out the extra money for more quality products..but if I can save myself from taking out extra loans that add to the insane price tag of my medical education, that's all good too.

    Any thoughts would greatly be appreciated.
     
  2. DRTigerlilly

    DRTigerlilly Tablet Lead Mod (Retired) Super Moderator

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    I think the tm2 is the best iteration of the hp consumer tablet pc's. I'd suggest going into bestbuy and playing around with it, but I think it would be a fair compromise with the price.

    It's a nice little machine.
     
  3. Agent 9

    Agent 9 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    The only draw back on the Tm2 is the screen. You will find it very usable for personal use (one person using/ viewing at a time; even up to 3 or 4 people seated right can watch a movie comfortably) The screen seems to bother some people more than it bothers others; The screen is far better than the average laptop screen, but it is nothing to brag about.

    As to the quality of the rest of the computer, well I don't think any other Tablet PC can come close: a very solid all Aluminum chassis, Very nice keyboard/ trackpad, 2.5" hdd (means you can put a nice ssd in for cheap), great speakers (probably best around), HDMI/ VGA/ memory card reader/ Ethernet/ good wi-fi and bluetooth/ and 3 USB ports, the option for a powerful ATI video chip option (if you chose to get the ATI option you actually have 2 graphics chips that you choose between, a low power and a high power one), and it is one of the coolest/ quietest running Tablet PC's.

    Sure some Tablet PC's will have some advantages over the Tm2, like some others being ultra lightweight, having the better screens, and better battery life using dual/ extended batteries. While some of those things would be nice to have, the Tm2 offers a very unique set of features for a very unique price.



    I would say wait for a good price on a Tm2, buy a decent ssd (no mater what hard drive you get it configured with it will have a good chance of dying; I bought a good one separably in July, and it ended up dying just a few weeks ago. that was when I switched to ssd, and I won't be going back)
     
  4. triggrhaapi

    triggrhaapi Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Agent 9, how's the battery life with the SSD? Better? Same? I want to not wait until my HDD dies for the switch to happen, but it's a spendy thing to do. I also want to see why I get an intermittent problem with startup and shut down (I get a one blink on the caps lock one moment then it boots the next like nothing happened)
     
  5. Agent 9

    Agent 9 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    The battery life is improved, but note that battery life will increase more dramatically for low usage scenarios (ie: reading a pdf/ comic/ manga) than it will for regular usage (internet browsing, music, photoshop). But I'm sure you'll see some improvement.

    But the speed, reliability, and durability/ resilience are unrivaled (plus no more noise, vibration, or worry about crashing a head):)


    PS: I use external 2.5" hdd's (in a simple usb enclosure; no power adapter needed) with a usb extension cable. this gives me huge amounts of storage and the ability to move it around a bit (while having all the advantages of the ssd in the Tm2)
     
  6. herewego

    herewego Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Is installing an SSD difficult?
     
  7. Stewge

    Stewge Pen Pal - Newbie

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    If only the Samsung mini-PCIe SSDs actually worked. That way we could have a 64GB SSD AND 500GB HDD all internally :p

    I have spotted them on ebay, but apparently no laptops actually support the sata-over-pcie that is used on those particular SSDs (unlike the ASUS EEE drives which are specialized hardware).

    For those who don't know:
    Samsung mini-PCIe SSD: up to 64GB of super-compact storage - SlashGear
     
  8. Agent 9

    Agent 9 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    It is very very simple:
    -remove 2 screws on "ram compartment cover" (then remove the cover)
    -then remove 2 screws on the "hdd compartment cover" (then remove the cover)
    -then slide the hard drive out (remove the 4 screws on the hard drive, and put them on the solid state drive)
    -then slide the new solid state drive in
    -replace the covers
    -Then install windows (either fresh, or a "ghost" of the one that was in there before)

    I recently got a (what used to be) over $300 ssd, for $215. This is because of the sales, and I'm sure more deals like this can be had (you'll probably have a better chance finding a good deal by looking in stores)

    It is well worth the time and money spent on getting a ssd
     
  9. herewego

    herewego Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hmm.. so installing a fresh copy of win7 would require an external optical drive? Should I buy the OS recovery cd?

    I apologize for all the questions. I'm pretty software savy but no next to nothing about installing new hardware.
     
  10. shadowyani

    shadowyani Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I'd agree mostly with what everyone is saying, except for the screen. The TM2 has one of the worst screens, if not the absolute worst screen you can get for a feature packed machine at the $1000 price point.

    How did HP achieve wacom pen technology, multitouch, and dedicated graphics in the same machine all for ~$1000? They skimped on the screen. Hardcore. Of course it wasn't enough of a reason to deter me from buying three, but bear in mind they're all sitting in HP's hands right now while a case manager personally inspects the color banding issue.

    ...and to think the TX1000, TX2000, and the TX2 before actually had even WORSE screens.
     
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