Windows 7, Multi Touch, and Magnifier

Discussion in 'Microsoft Windows 7' started by GraysonPeddie, Aug 19, 2010.

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  1. GraysonPeddie

    GraysonPeddie Pen Pal - Newbie

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    For anyone with a capacitive touch screen that supports multi touch and is running Windows 7, I do have a few questions that I like to ask. If you have a convertible, such as HP Touchsmart TX or TM (or whatever convertible tablet PC that you have), I suggest you put your tablet PC into slate mode, because I plan to buy a tablet PC that does not have a keyboard.

    If you can launch a virtual keyboard (unfortunately, I'm using Windows Vista Ultimate, but mine's located in Start > All Programs > Accessories > Ease of Access > On-Screen Keyboard), can you hold a Windows key and press an equal key? That should activate Windows' built-in magnifier, but only if an Aero Glass is enabled.

    Does the on-screen keyboard stay in the screen or does the virtual keyboard resize when you magnify the screen?

    If you go into magnifier options and enable keyboard tracking, does the on-screen keyboard stay as they are as you type (not a physical keyboard but a keyboard that is already on the screen)?

    Although the demonstrator is using a keyboard and mouse to demonstrate the use of the magnifier, here's the video:
    YouTube - Windows 7 Magnifier

    These are kind of questions that I'd like to ask. While I could investigate myself by heading over to any retail stores and test out some of Windows 7's features, I really don't know if I can mess with convertibles if they have one, as I'd like to get a good idea about what multitouch will be like if I use Windows 7's magnifier.
     
  2. adretzios

    adretzios Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Very peculiar questions. If typing is of importance, do not buy a slate. Period. Slates are not designed for text entry beyond the mere basics (capacitive screens or not). Slates are usually used in vertical applications (production lines, healthcare) for specific data entry or for media "consumption" (aka iPad). If you intend to be doing a decent amount of writing, do not buy a slate. It would be a waste of time and it would frustrate you no end. In may opinion, this is just a fad, just like 3D etc, etc.

    If you need to have a slate, wait until the end of the year. A number of manufacturers would be releasing slates that would have ironed out some of the Win7 hard edges and they would have provided some more touch friendly apps. Or get one of the many Android slates that are about to enter the market.
     
  3. GraysonPeddie

    GraysonPeddie Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I only come here to ask if others who have Windows 7 and a capacitive screen in a convertible PC if they have tried using multitouch with Windows' built-in magnifier. Yes, I did mention about the on-screen keyboard, but my thread is primarily about the use of magnifier in conjunction with multitouch, even when it comes to using an on-screen keyboard.

    This thread is not about whether I should go with a slate or a convertible PC for typing.
     
  4. Agent 9

    Agent 9 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    OK, let me see if I can answer some of your questions. First of all I have a HP Tm2, and it excels my every expectation, and I expert a LOT from it, but it continues to outdo itself at every turn.
    So for starters this is being "touch-typed" in portrait slate mode, its not the most efficient (please ignore any grammatical errors), but its nice to have the options to do computer work in many different ways, as it keeps it new, refreshing, and enjoyable. :)

    I can, on my Tm2 (in a "fresh" install of windows 7, which has touch/ pen input built in) pull up the keyboard, which is sitting minimized on the left edge of my screen. then I put my finger on the "Windows" key and press the "=" key with another finger, it immediately zooms in 200% and brings up a sliver of a window that has a few buttons. then I can zoom in or out with the "-" and "+" buttons on the window that pops up. then if I go in the "views" pull down menu I have the options to either do "full screen" zoom (the default option), "Lens" zoom, or "Docked" zoom, the option for preview in full screen is grayed out. there is then a little Options" launcher, and help launcher. when the window isn't in use it turns into a magnifying glass icon floating on your screen where the window was.

    -The "full screen" zoom works where you zoom in on the whole screen and your mouse cursor moves around in that area, the on screen keyboard is treated as a part of the screen, and zoomed on as well. basically the "full screen" option is useless in slate mode with use of on screen keyboard.
    -The "Lens" option places a movable (and re-sizable through a a diagram thing in "Magnifier Options" menu) rectangle on your screen that acts like a magnifying glass for that area only. it looks like this one could be usable for somethings, but the problem is it obstructs your view of the screen partially
    -The "Docked" option will put a window at the top of your screen that you can re-size, the bottom of which acts like your screen's top edge. This seems like the best one of them, as it lets you type and see your window without blocking part of your window. (this is also movable, just click-hold and drag it around your screen)

    Note, that none of these support multi-finger zooming, instead the multi-finger input is translated to the window that is being viewed in the magnifier.

    There are then three options in the Magnifier Options menu that govern what is followed/ and how. I am writing this assuming you are using the "Docked" option, as the "Lens" option is straight forward in that it stays put, and the "full screen" option is pretty much useless.

    -"Follow the mouse pointer" which follows the pointer all over the screen, annoying for touch typing because it just shows you the keys you are typing on.
    -"Follow the keyboard focus" it only seems to show you when you right click somewhere on the screen, or when you select a pull down menu. (i'm sure there are other ways to re-position the zoomed area, I just don't know them) but still this seems to be the best option for viewing a stationary part of the screen.
    -"Have magnifier follow the text insertion point" this one will show you a magnified view of what you are typing. This is the best option to see what you are typing magnified.

    If you are just looking to zoom in quickly and see something (no on screen typing) then your best bet would be the "full screen" option as it gives you a good large view of what you want to see.

    OK, that turned out waaay longer than I expected, if anyting, I'm always thorough. If you liked the info I gave you (there is a lot of it) and if it helped you then please rep me. I hope I could help you out.
     
  5. GraysonPeddie

    GraysonPeddie Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Seems Microsoft needs to work on the on-screen keyboard.

    Thank you so much for the information about the multitouch support for Windows' built-in magnifier and how it affects the ability for the visually impaired to type in an on-screen keyboard! :)
     
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