windows 7 lite.

Discussion in 'Microsoft Windows 7' started by Kyle Porter, Feb 27, 2009.

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  1. Kyle Porter

    Kyle Porter Veteran Moderator Senior Member

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    I was reading a article (http://windows7news.com/2008/11/14/windows-7-lite/) and it showed how vlite can be used on windows 7 install to make, you guessed it, windows 7 lite.

    I thought some people may appreciate this information. Personally, as soon as i get home i am trying this out. I can only imagine how much space i could pull off (unused drivers, unused programs, etc).
     
  2. arachnyd

    arachnyd Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I've got Windows 7 running at 6.5 GB installed while retaining all multimedia and tablet functionality. Vlite worked great! 10x faster than vista too. (thats not a scientific study, thats a figure of speech-but it is faster even compared to vlited vista)
     
  3. Kyle Porter

    Kyle Porter Veteran Moderator Senior Member

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    Dude, windows 7 was 10x faster then vista anyways. I could really see the results on my tablet due to the slow hdd and ULV processor.
     
  4. newsposter

    newsposter E295C + a pile of gadgets

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    All you have to do to streamline XP or Vista or WIn7 is to educate yourself on how to manage and shut off services. Disk space is trivially inexpensive; the downsides of 'removing' OS components with a tool not endorsed by the OS maker are so many and so huge that it's really not worth the effort.

    On the other hand, by learning about services, what are essential, nice to have, and what can be turned off, a user can easily, safely, and REVERSABLY reduce the memory and CPU footprint of the OS. By shutting of optional or unneeded services, the processes behind them are not run. It's as simple as that.

    Why is REVERSABLY capialized? Because the 'changes' made by vlite and nlite are just that, irreversable. If a user removes a driver cache or languages or keyboard support or help file support it cannot be reinstalled. The support forums for nlite and vlite are full of postings that amount to "I removed something by mistake and need it, how can I get it back" and responses of "Not Possible, start over".

    Having said all that, I have personally used nlite and vlite for 3 or 4 years. I've gone through the learning cycle of stripping an OS load down, testing, running it into a real machine, and then finding my errors. After countless iterations modifying both XP and Vista I'm to the point of leaving the OS intact and simply shutting off services and adding registry tweaks. A detailed read of the nlite and vlite forums will show that experienced users almost universally get to this point.

    Other than picking up bragging rights for being able to create the 'smallest' Vista or XP load that can boot to the desktop, there isn't a lot of of useful activity there.
     
  5. Kyle Porter

    Kyle Porter Veteran Moderator Senior Member

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    While most of what you say is true, you cannot deny there is a LOT of useless items in windows.

    How about the hundred different languages in there, and you know (for a fact) that you only need one? The same goes for the keyboards, extra fonts, and useless windows programs that you know you will replace with another program (windows mail anyone?).
     
  6. Triple_Dude

    Triple_Dude Aspiring Artist

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    Thanks for the link kpvic :).

    Having said that, I agree with pretty much newsposter said.

    I'm currently running a heavily tweaked XP install that has all the non-essentials turned off and help files deleted (I've been using Windows since 3.1; used every version except for Win 2K3 Server to date. I think I can hold my own in a Windows environment without help files ;)).

    And plus, with HDD space being such a small issue, a extra gig or two for Windows files are fine with me if it keeps me from having to re-install every time I run into a problem.

    Regarding Keyboards and Fonts... how much space do you think they take up? Less than 100MB, if even that. Being a typographer, fonts are necessary for my line of work any ways ;).
     
  7. Kyle Porter

    Kyle Porter Veteran Moderator Senior Member

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    The reason why i like to tweak my OS is so i can have a full install under 3.5gb so i can find a version of SuperVolume for windows seven (*drooling remembering his raid 5 speeds on tablet*).
     
  8. newsposter

    newsposter E295C + a pile of gadgets

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    The 'memory commit' size of an OS bears absolutely NO relationship to the 'installed on disk' size. Lots of software require the full load of languages and keyboards as supplied by Microsoft. Unicode is becoming universal (!) and as such, the system needs to be able to be able to interpret double-byte character codes. But nothing gets loaded from disk to memory until it's used.

    The memory commit size is what you have to pay attention to with your project to work out an instant-on setup.

    For example, the memory commit on my Tablet is 650Mb (plus swap) which is 20% of available ram. I have linux desktop images that have a memory commit of less than 100 Mb.
     
  9. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I personally always had stripped out stuff from my installs in the past, with n-lite on XP, and vLite on Vista, but recently I decided it wasn't worth the effort. I mean, service packs have almost never worked, so I'd have to install the OS again entirely, and more importantly, I don't even need much disk space. I've got a 32GB SSD in my current Dell XT, but I'd have been perfectly fine with a 16GB SSD as well, without ripping anything out, and even keeping the hibernation file intact (3GB RAM). Though maybe on a 16GB I wouldn't have installed so many games.

    My desktop, that has a 500 GB hard drive, but that's only for recording purposes with Media Center. I've actually been tempted lately to add in an SSD for that, and then just have the hard drive only used for recordings. All of my other media is stored on a server anyway and just used over the network.

    But anyway, I think unless you have less than 16GB storage space, there is absolutely no reason to vlite anymore. It just complicates things down the line.
     
  10. newsposter

    newsposter E295C + a pile of gadgets

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    I've gone with a hybrid approach to conventional hard drive and SSD.

    My tablet came with a decent 120Gb hard drive. 64 Gb high-speed flash memory devices, not strictly called an 'ssd' can be had for well under $150-.

    I added an expresscard 64 Gb device and moved my temp and paging spaces there as well as all of the huge/static things I carry around like ebooks and various ISOs and my local VirtualBox VHD files. There is plenty of room for a full-sized hibernation/sleep file as well as a lot of free space for future needs.

    Coming out of hibernation, the XP bootloader lights up off the HDD, takes over, goes after the hibernation file, and in about 15 seconds I'm at the desktop.

    By the time I outgrow this setup, 'real' 256Gb SSDs will be reasonably priced. There is no sense being on the bleeding edge unless you have cash to burn or are selling the things to people and need a demo machine.

    And speaking of bleeding edge, there is a new SD memory card spec called SDXC. Capacities up to 2Tb per card, 'guaranteed' transfer speeds of 100Mbps with a second generation speed bump to 300 Mbps. The spec was just released with products due after the 2010 CES & CeBIT.
     
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