Windows 10 on SP1 dual boot

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by al404, Oct 3, 2014.

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  1. al404

    al404 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I'm trying to dual boot windows 10 on SP1
    i shrink my drive and made a 29Gb available drive, formatted as NTFS
    got iso to usb, i can correctly see my usb from windows 8 but when i shut down and press volume down + power it just boots into windows 8.1
    i did try to reboot into blue recovery and i see 2 usb an uefi and a generic usb, i try to start from both but it just boots into windows 8.1

    i also try to disable safe boot with out any different results

    if i start setup from win 8 it doesn't give me an option to install on a different partition

    i'm stuck
     
  2. al404

    al404 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    ok i got a solution

    rebooted in in Advance setup

    after booting in blue screen to prompt and from there

    wmic logicaldisk get name
    to see drivers letters

    F:
    to change drive

    dir /b
    to see what is in the drive, because drives letters doesn't match with what you see under windows

    once i found usb key

    setup.exe
    to start setup

    after that you can follow any other guid that shows how dual boot windows 10, only strange thing it complained about prepared partition that wasn't NTFS
    i'm pretty sure i did format under win 8, i just formatted again on setup and proced

    now on boot i can chose which system boot into
     
  3. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Honestly, I wouldn't even install to a new partition. It's not worth dealing with resizing partitions. First, make sure that your hard drive has a lot of free space (in my example I used 80GB).

    Boot your USB key, and then press Shift-F10 to open command prompt.

    Then you'll want to run something along these lines (note that the drive letter might not be C after booting from the USB drive, you'll have to figure that out in the command prompt on your own):

    diskpart
    create vdisk file=C:\Win10.vhd type=expandable maximum=80000
    select vdisk file=C:\Win10.vhd
    attach vdisk

    You can then close out of the command prompt, and after going through setup and selecting the "Custom" button, you'll see your ~80GB (or whatever size you did) drive as unallocated space on a separate disk. Choose to install to that. Then you're completely finished. Windows 8 (and 10) boot natively from a virtual hard disk file.

    If you ever want to get rid of Windows 10, you can boot into Windows 8 from the menu that'll pop up each boot, and then delete the VHD file.

    This was sort of originally based on Scott Hanselman's article for the Windows 8 preview, but I've been doing it ever since:
    http://www.hanselman.com/blog/Guide...s8DeveloperPreviewOffAVHDVirtualHardDisk.aspx

    Edit: In a later article I hadn't yet seen, he makes a good point that users probably should backup their bcd file (this is what configures which OS boots up).

    http://www.hanselman.com/blog/HowTo...ws8ConsumerPreviewOffAVHDVirtualHardDisk.aspx
     
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  4. horn

    horn Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Maybe you can unzip the ISO file using winRAR, then double click setup.exe to install it. Make sure put windows 10 fold in another hard drive.
     
  5. dblkk

    dblkk Pen Pal - Newbie

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  6. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Yes, but messing with your Windows partition is not something that most users should do. If you can avoid having to shrink your main OS install, then you should in all cases.
     
  7. dblkk

    dblkk Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Keeping the two OS on completely separate partitions would/could easily prevent a damage/corrupt action happening in one OS running, from affecting both OS. This also allows writes/reads on the sdd to operate under normal designed situations. Not that either is a huge deal. But the fact that something happening while running one OS could ruin both, especially to the novice user, is what caused me to repartition without a second thought.
     
  8. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    That's not how it works, but okay, whatever. :D
     
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