Why You Should (or Shouldn’t) Use a Tablet as a Laptop

Discussion in 'News Headlines' started by Ed Hardy, Sep 1, 2017.

  1. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy Editor, TabletPCReview Staff Member

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    Sales of traditional notebooks are slipping while the market for tablets and convertible 2-in-1 devices is on the rise. Should your next computer be a tablet with a keyboard? The answer to that question depends on how you’ll use the device.

    Read the full content of this Article: http://www.tabletpcreview.com/feature/shouldnt-use-tablet-laptop/
     
  2. crossface

    crossface Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I’m not sure it’s really fair to say that a Windows tablet has a higher starting price than an Apple tablet. Although not specifically stated in the article, I’m assuming the statement is based on comparing a $329 iPad 9.7 inch to a $500 Samsung Galaxy Book 10.6 inch. But, the Galaxy Book includes a keyboard and stylus, and supports system-wide stylus/inking support. I don’t think there is a direct apples-to-apples that you can conjure up for these, but to get in the neighborhood of the Galaxy Book, I think you’d have to take the $550 iPad 10.5 Pro with the additional $100 Apple Pencil and $100+ keyboard. That puts your iPad at $750 compared to the $500 Galaxy Book. Now, as you say, the processor in the iPad is probably quite a bit more powerful, so it’s still not really and apples-to-apples.

    Just to try it out, I got a Bluetooth Wacom stylus and used it with a non-Pro iPad. Compared to Windows inking, that experience was terrible. I’m sure the iPad Pro + Pencil is probably comparable to Windows inking. I would assume any purchaser of the Galaxy Book would be very dependent on inking, so that’s why I say you have to upgrade the iPad you’re comparing it to.

    I’m also not really sure that cost is really much of a factor in whether a person does or should choose an iPad or a Windows tablet. I think they’re both great at doing a lot of things, and both great at doing a number of things different than one another, but I also think most tablet buyers would want either the features the iPad offers or the features the Windows tablet offers. I don’t think someone would say, “I’ll buy the iPad because it’s $50 cheaper.” I think they would pay the extra $50 because they wanted to run full Windows programs. Or, they’d pay $50 more for the iPad so they can watch Amazon Prime videos offline (pet peeve of mine for Amazon/Windows).

    I don't mean to be nitpicky. It's a good article and good advice throughout, but the statement that Windows tablets have a higher starting price struck me. Technically, I can buy a crappy Newvision Windows tablet for less than $100 brand new. No brand new iPad has ever been that cheap.
     
  3. convergent

    convergent Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I would have liked to see this taken a little deeper. To me, much of the debate goes beyond the surface differences. Apple has chosen for you to carry two devices (three if you count your phone) if you want to be able to do serious work, and have the portability of the tablet. By serious work, I am referring to work that can't be done productively on a tiny screen with touch only as an interface. I am a consultant and often need to have 3 or 4 applications open while I'm pulling information in and updating complex multi-tab spreadsheets. This can't easily be done on a small screen, forgetting the touch only limitation. Likewise, touch is very useful on a full function laptop. What caused me to buy a Surface over an iPad, is in the end the iPad is a big iPhone. If I could dock it and get the full function of MacOS with a mouse, big screen, etc... I would view them as equivalent options. But if I carried an iPad, I'd always need to also carry a laptop of some type.
     
  4. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy Editor, TabletPCReview Staff Member

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    But if someone's not interested in inking, and a lot tablet buyers aren't, then they'd be paying extra for something they'd never use. But you make a good point that the cost of a keyboard needs to be factored in when considering using an iPad as a laptop alternative. But in the end, we're talking about a relatively small difference in price either way.

    As you said, it's not easy to make an apple-to-apples comparison because people's needs vary so much. In retrospect, it would have been better if I'd made the same point you did: the cost difference is a minor consideration, and people should buy the device that best fits their needs.

    Someone being nitpicky on the Internet?!? Who's ever heard of such a thing. ;-D

     
  5. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy Editor, TabletPCReview Staff Member

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    I understand, and that's true for many people. Or these people can do what you did and get a Windows tablet.

    That said, some of your comments are based on the iPad of several years ago. For example, my iPad Pro has a screen larger than my Surface Pro. I regularly keep two iOS applications or web pages open side-by-side. I don't find more than two practical on any laptop or tablet screen, no matter the OS, but then my eyes aren't as young as they used to be.

     
  6. convergent

    convergent Scribbler - Standard Member

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    You misunderstood my comment about screen size. I'm not talking about the tablet display, which in most cases you are going to only get one app at a time and task switch (alt-tab) from app to to app. I'm talking about the ability to plug the tablet into an external display (which I'm doing now with nSP) and have a 27" 4K display, or multiple displays, at your disposal. Why do I want to use one device when mobile, and another different device when at my desk, and then have to sync them to each other or deal with a completely different OS in those two scenarios. With an iPad, you are going to have two different OSs to deal with, even if you stay with Apple, since MacOS and iOS bare little resemblance in day to day use. I have not had a "laptop" computer in a very long time that wasn't my docked desk machine when in the office, so using an external display is a big part of the laptop experience. Up until I bought the nSP, my most loved setup was a MacBook Air with Thunderbolt display... great portability and great desk power. But using a tablet PC like the nSP in docked mode and mobile mode is so much better.
     
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