Why I'm returning my SP3 and going back to the two device method...

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by Steve B, Jan 17, 2015.

  1. fatpolomanjr

    fatpolomanjr Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Haha, yes, I have certainly noticed that, as I like to listen to audio radio streams with the display off to conserve battery. Thankfully two of the stations I listen to can be found on Tune-In, an awesome little Windows 8 app that keeps running when the screen is off. For the other station...not sure how I'll manage that one aside from disabling connected standby, which I just now discovered in this thread. Thanks!
     
  2. rlx

    rlx Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I agree that the Surface is very good as a tablet and I wouldn't use it as a laptop either. A pure tablet is not that helpful for writing code so I use a desktop for that; laptop screens are too small for me. I have a Bluetooth keyboard that didn't find more than half an hour of use during the last five years.

    I believe that the Surface could replace my current desktop; I just need to connect the desktop display, keyboard and mouse to the Surface.

    I regularly use a desktop, two tabletPC's, and a Galaxy Note 1 and all had their specific use up to now. I am not really waiting for a do-it-all device but I think that the Surface could replace the desktop and one tablet. I wish the next iteration of the Surface will have a screen a little wider with the OLED technology combined with a Core-M processor for extended battery life and I hope that Windows10 at last provides a real integrated Surface concept.
     
  3. kornchild2002

    kornchild2002 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I think a lot of peoples' issues with the Surface Pro line, when it's being used as a notebook, would be solved with a hard clam shell keyboard much like what Asus has done with their Transformer line of tablets. That gives you a tablet for when you need it and a notebook that can sit on any surface (including your lap) instead of a hard, flat surface. The SP3 is more than portable enough to be used as a primary tablet. It's not as thin and light as an iPad Air 2 but it's only 50 grams heavier than other 12.2" tablets like the Samsung Galaxy Note Pro 12.2. The SP3 offers much better performance compared to the Note Pro 12.2, Windows is smoother when running apps/programs side-by-side, it actually receives updates, and it is more expandable with the built-in USB port and docking station option.

    So it is very comparable to other tablets in its size class in terms of overall dimensions and weight. In fact, the SP3 is shorter and not as wide as the Note Pro 12.2 while being 1.15 mm thicker. It's really not bad at all.

    Luckily I really only ever use my Surface Pro 2 as a notebook on hard, flat surfaces. I have a comfy notebook lap desk I use while I'm on my couch if I need to connect my Surface's keyboard. Most of the time I just use the Surface without the keyboard when I'm on my couch, in the kitchen, etc. The keyboard is attached at all times when my SP2 is docked to my external monitor, speakers, and hard drives but that's for normal desktop use.

    Everyone has their opinions on what works for them but after having a SP2 for 7-8 months now, I just cannot see myself going back to a two device world. I guess I should clarify. I do have a Dell Venue 8 Pro for my bedroom (it's just a glorified Facebook tablet) and a Galaxy S5 as my smartphone. The Dell tablet never leaves the bedroom and my S5 goes everywhere with me. When I say two devices, I mean a notebook/desktop and a primary tablet. I just don't want to go back to worrying about syncing content between a main PC and tablet, making sure things didn't get lost in the cloud, making sure I had a backup of two devices, and always worrying about carrying two devices, chargers, and other accessories for those two devices with me. I had a 15" MacBook Pro and iPad mini (it used to be an iPad 3) along with my iPhone 5. I grew tiresome carrying around everything. My MBP was light for a 15" notebook but it was still a pain to carry. I felt the same way when I used to carry my 13" MBA and iPad 3. I hated carrying two devices around especially when I could get away with using the iPad for all of my entertaining needs.

    Now, with my SP2, I carry around one device and one charger. I don't even have to carry my phone's charger anymore as my SP2's AC adapter has a USB port in it. I just need to bring a USB cable and that will also charge my digital camera. I've been able to cut down on the clutter while upgrading to a 10" widescreen tablet (that's really not that much heavier than my original iPad was) while still retaining the processing power of my MBA all in a device that takes much better notes than my iPad or any other Galaxy Note device.

    For me, it is a no brainer to continue with the Surface Pro line. But everyone is different and there isn't a be all, end all solution that works for everyone.
     
  4. Fluffyfurball

    Fluffyfurball Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Really good counterpoints there kornchild. I'm appreciating the points of view in this thread.
     
  5. JoeS

    JoeS I'm all ears Senior Member

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    OK, better late than never, my current view of this: personally after using the SP2 for more than a year I want a device that can give a rock solid laptop mode, that I can flip around into media mode like the TP Yoga, that I can write on, and ideally: that I can pluck the screen off and snap a cover on to use as inking tablet only.

    So basically I'd like a TP Yoga with removable screen. Barring that, I'm heading back to a TP Yoga after my SP2. I like the SP2, but the floppy laptop mode, the 'over the edge of the knee problem' (aka the airplane tray problem), the mediocre trackpad, the sharp edge of the stand, and the occasional accidental cover disconnect all make me wish for an actual laptop. On the other hand, I like the notion of the Helix 2, but I imagine that sitting on the couch and banging out an all important post on TPCR while watching Netflix I don't want to have to 'rip and flip' to go back to media mode, which is keyboard behind the screen. No way to do that on a Helix without detaching and reattaching the screen. (first world problems..) I also don't want an underpowered core-M, so the Helix is out anyway.

    A TP Yoga allows me a comfortable media mode ('stand mode'), and a very easy flip from laptop to tablet mode (even easier than with the X220t with its swivel hinge), and a nice smoothly varying screen angle. And Wacom, let's not forget that. The one thing I'll definitely miss is walking around with a single tablet that holds all my data, and that's still almost as portable as a paper notebook.

    Wild prediction: I'll go all-in on a TP Yoga, onelink dock, then miss the portability, and buy an SP4. Oh the money wasted!
     
  6. koz2050

    koz2050 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    This is it right here. When I finally decided to treat my tablet as a tablet (to replace my pen/paper notebook) and not a computer, things got a lot simpler. Before, I was trying to make my tablet a mirror of my primary computer and that's where things get more complicated.

    When I decided to liberate my tablet and just let it be a tablet it was much happier. It's great to know I have full Win 8 (versus an iPad or whatever) so I can have access to apps I need in a pinch (like corporate apps, email, remote desktop, etc), but those don't need to be synced really and just using it as a tablet gives it a longer run time.

    It is one more thing to charge, but the trade off for me is that I can take notes that sync everywhere I need and use it for occasional tablet stuff and those things outweighs the cons.

    When I realized that I was already carrying two things (laptop and paper notebook) I was able to decide what I wanted that second thing to be, a paper notebook or a tablet. So after putting it into context it's actually a simplification of what I was already doing.
     
  7. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    Yea, if Core M isn't enough power then detachable probably isn't the way to go. I think it is really Core M that is finally making the detachable form factor work. Prior to Core M the slate was too heavy because of the added bulk necessary for cooling and the larger battery, so detachables were too topple prone (or had bases that were too heavy). That is why I decided to go with the T904 last year.

    I'm really drooling over the detachable z20t now though, but, in my use case, I'm not worried about the lack of compute power on my laptop. For those that need more, the detachable form factor might be a couple years away from being ready for you.
     
  8. koz2050

    koz2050 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    That sounds like the Helix 2nd Gen with their new ultra pro keyboard or whatever it's called (rip and flip).
     
  9. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    His second paragraph specifically nixes that one.
     
  10. koz2050

    koz2050 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Yes, so it does. So much for my reading skills :) I guess I'll just blame to the too small of font on my TP10 :)

    I also agree with his points and am anxiously awaiting the new TP Yoga with normal trackpoint buttons. It's a little large/heavy for a "tablet", but that dual mode functionality is hard to beat.
     

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