Where is the updated Samsung Galaxy Book 12???

Discussion in 'Samsung' started by DRTigerlilly, Aug 7, 2019.

  1. Tams

    Tams Scribbler - Standard Member

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    The Surface Book 2 is really expensive though. In the limited capacity that I've seen of IT procurement in education, it is only something a head of department, or maybe only a headmaster/principal would be offered. Everyone else gets stuff more akin to Surface GOs or Surface Laptop (low spec) stuff. Usually, it's some generic Dell, HP, Fujitsu thing that I'm sure the school/education board are being fleeced over.
     
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  2. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I’m somewhat disappoint over this Galaxy Book S as well....but the fact that they didn’t outright name it Galaxy Book 3 is at least suggests we still might see a more proper penabled Book 3 at some point down the line.

    However....in regards to the Book S...I do find the Core i5 equivalent claim of power quite interesting.

    The biggest problem with the Book 2 was its low end specs. 4GB of Ram and Windows on Arm with dreadful performance on legacy Windows application. It scored weaker then the Book 10.6’s core m3.

    Thankfully they bumped the Ram up (to at least match a cellphone).....but if they can indeed jury rig the Windows on ARM emulation to at level of performance comparable to 8th/9th gen 15w core i5’s....... while maintaining the 10- 20’ish hour battery life.....I might very well cash in for a Book 3 should it get released.
     
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  3. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    That's my question mark as well. We were told that the current Snapdragon in the Galaxy Book 2 was comparable to a high end i3 and it was... on about two web benchmarks but real world was more like a high end Celeron except for the handful of native Office apps.

    And trying to use full blown acrobat on it is full on tortuous.

    OTOH, especially as regards to X86 emulation, 8GB should help a lot. In the testing we did, the emulation alone was using up over 2GB RAM.
     
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  4. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I can't help but feel Qualcomm / MS are shooting themselves in the foot by promising the world for all these new WOS chips.

    If the promises pan out (spoiler: hasn't happened), then no one even gets excited, since it's just expected. But when those chips under-deliver, then it's another mark against the platform as whole, undermining consumer confidence.

    Take a look at Notebookcheck's depressing retrospectives first in 2018 and early 2019:

    "Unfortunately, most Windows applications are optimized for x86 only and system performance drops like a lead balloon when attempting to run such programs. CineBench, PCMark, 3DMark, Super Pi, FurMark, and more would either run extremely slowly or not launch at all. It's a strange experience of extremes as performance would be buttery smooth one minute only to become like molasses the next..."

    Meanwhile, you have Qualcomm busy trying to convince the public that the 8cx is the equivalent or better to the most popular laptop CPU, on Intel's most refined and iterated process node, with years of OS and chipset optimization behind it.

    Why can't Qualcomm just be honest? It's a new platform. There will be bugs. You will need to adjust. Don't expect a drop-in replacement to your current x86 daily driver.

    Right now people are being set up to expect 15W quadcore ULV performance, at 7W power consumption. I'm sorry, but laws of physics means 8cx will have middling performance, with middling battery life (between a Core and an ARM)⁠—along with all the bugs and growing pains that come with any new platform⁠—that is what any reasonable person would expect.

    But somehow they insist on hyping this up to high heaven. How is this anything but reckless marketing? :confused:
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
  5. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    The truth is worse than most know. It's not hyperbole to say my job wouldn't exist if the companies were honest about real performance.

    I'm not going to name names, but they almost all play games with benchmarks for instance (and why I come across as so anti-benchmark).

    At best they cherry pick those benchmarks that put them in the best light and won't talk about others.

    In the next circle downward you have situations where a system will meet a certain performance spec, but only in extremely artificial conditions (one vendor told us to test at 55 degrees Farenheit and 10% relative humidity....)

    And the lower circle still is those that actively put software and firmware that detects benchmarks being run and either puts the machine in a non standard state or worse yet they put little hidden appletts or processes whose only purpose is to run that small fragment of case in that benchmark.

    We had a developer that worked for us awhile back that used to be part of the team that built Winbench and he said it was a constant arms race between the benchmark and the companies trying to cheat them.

    To give some context to that rant above, we make highly custom devices which all rely on connectivity of some sort to a more general computing platform. It includes WiFi, bluetooth, USB, Thunderbolt, etc. But the key thing in all cases is that the device meets the published spec for those interfaces.

    We publish to our customers "known good" systems that will work with our devices as designed. For various reasons many of our customers can't or won't use what we recommend and so we offer certification tests for the devices they choose to submit. The pass fail rate is about 50%.......

    Ok enough griping, I found out we are getting our engineering sample of the new chip in the Samsung to start testing late next week. I'm curious what we will find.
     
  6. JoeS

    JoeS I'm all ears Senior Member

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    As in the SD 8cx? I hear good things, looking forward to your take on it.
     
  7. nnthemperor

    nnthemperor Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Honestly, life would be much easier for us all if Intel would do their homework and come up with an atom competitor to Arm.
    Why after so many years of chip building they still can't come up with a decent x86 chip beats me.

    Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk
     
  8. Tams

    Tams Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I think Qualcomm are the main culprit and are possibly taking Microsoft for a bit of a ride. The first WOS devices were just repurposed normal Qualcomm designs and if you look at their wearable SoCs, the 'new'(ish) 3100 was just a rehash of a 2013 SoC. They just didn't want to invest the money required to make a more customised SoC. So colour me sceptical of the 8cx being anything special.
    Now, the 8cx might be a more custom design and Qualcomm do have a near wearable that is apparently more customised for its use case as well, so maybe they are putting their money where their mouth is now...
     
  9. RXP

    RXP Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I was disappointed at the lack of an OLED screen. That's the only reason I use my Book 12 and TabS Pro. Thankfully Samsung has those 15.6" 4k panels available - hopefully in a couple of years they come down in price.
     
  10. nyb72

    nyb72 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Looking forward to 8cx reviews. I'm hoping for some good real world performance.
    And then I hope it goes into a GB3 with Spen.
    In other words, my foray into apple pencil needs to be mercifully over...
     

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