What tablet would you buy today if you had unlimited play around money?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by JoeS, Jul 18, 2020.

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  1. JoeS

    JoeS I'm all ears Senior Member

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    Well sure, but does that really count as a tablet though.. :p
     
  2. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Ooooh. Good point. To justify the budget, I'd have to hire digital musicians, give them giant touch interfaces and their choice of top-flight recording software. Small sacrifices, I guess. :)
     
  3. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Count me in please!

    I've yet to try e-ink drawing but it sounds like it would be pretty good.
     
  4. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    Something with a 4K 10-bit wide-gamut display like the ZBook x360. Still waiting for my device to fail so I have a reason to upgrade.
     
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  5. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    But would an unlimited "tech" budget include Staffing? I think Human resources would deny that expenditure.

    But it gives me a better idea, why waste that tech on seasoned professionals and established talent (who likely already have that tech or the money to get it) when you could invest in the next generation. Like just think of how many struggling/poor/deviant art artists who for years made due with the lowest priced wacom bamboo or Intuos only dreaming of one day using or owning a Cintiq. I remember in my earlier days when the only tablet PC's I could afford were the discontinued refurbed options on lenovos digital clearance rack (ah the x61t), the first time I got to use a Cintiq at a store in NYC I must have spent at least an hour drawing on it. You would see a similar scenario at the Wacom booth at NYC Comic Cons where to just sketch on a Cintiq would have a 20-30 minute wait.

    I'd make an Art/Design/Animation house, stocked with top line computers, pro level software installed, and cintiqs, but I would make it the digital equivalent of a library. Like a space for aspiring creatives to have access to that tech but in a sort of open computer/art lab way. But not locked to a school or being enrolled in a program, it would be more like a public accommodation like a library, where anyone who wants to use it could regardless of their financial situation. Kind of like a digital art community center. It would be a place where aspiring artists could be social, they could work on their own projects, but you could also pitch and encourage collaborations, or hold contests to foster specific ideas to life. You might not have the same level of outright control over the finished product as you would with a paid staff, but I think this concept would be a great way to cultivate the next generation of talent, or give that untapped potential talent an avenue of expression it might not have had otherwise. It could create a physical community of digital creativity.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2020
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  6. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I mean you go to so many cafés already, ever think of starting your own?

    I think it would be a hit, maybe even become the new unofficial form of modern art gallery. ;)
     
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  7. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I’ve actually considered the prospect of opening and running my own coffee shop multiple times...except I am not even remotely a morning person. And I’ve spoken to the owners of many a coffee shop, even if they can eventually get to the point where they themselves don’t have to wake up at 4am, it’s not likely to happen for a while and depends on how much staffing can be hired. And as much as I would like to argue to the contrary that coffee shops could well attract a night time crowd...given how uncommon that is, I think it would be too much of a financial gamble.

    but if money was no object and I could combine that with my earlier idea in my last post...the studio space and tech would be free to use, but if I were to incorporate a coffee bar on site, that would likely be at an additional charge. But for that digital art/community center concept I’d envision, I think a liquor license could also be fun since then I could host digital drink and draws. Maybe like a coffee bar during the day, and then a bar bar at night. But I would make sure the bar still has access to the coffee. I would totally be sipping an espresso martini the whole night as I draw a live model posing.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2020
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  8. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Sorry guys but the cynic in me who has spent 20 years with students who refuse to wash paintbrushes that don't belong to them has given me a strong aversion to the idea of
    1) free access to someone else's computers (or any art equipment)
    2) free access to someone else's computers (or any art equipment) with coffee in the vicinity
    3) Free access to someone else's computers (or any art equipment) with alcohol in the vicinity.

    That student aversion to washing paintbrushes (despite lessons in how to do it) goes for nearly everything else that we let students have access to. Sewing machines / graphic tablets / plaster moulding / re-useable clay - anything that someone hasn't paid for is going to be misused. At the end of the lesson you THINK everything has been cleaned and put back then you find the now single use paint-brushes that were hidden under the desk because the acrylic paint has hardened on forever or the sewing machine has broken needles or worse still - the free-embroidery feet have been stolen so they can try at home on their own equipment.

    5 years ago I nearly quit my job, I wanted to open a bookable ceramics and printing studio with coffee bar and a bookable gallery - people could book in groups and classes which I would run. They could display work in the gallery or book it out. 2 things stopped me - my naturally fearful partner (who I love and so will never give up) and an ex student thinking along the same lines opened one up in our small town.
    She runs a ceramics workshop that people can book and she also runs girls nights where groups of women can do some slipcasting and have a bottle of wine while they work. Cazz got the details just right - the moulds range from "easy" (mugs and cute creatures) to complex (heads / skulls / motorbikes) and most people love making their own mug. After they have their evening, Cazz tidies up any bad workmanship on their pieces, glazes them and fires them.
    http://caroline-nash.co.uk/workshops/
    Customers have had a fab night, a week later, they get their own hand-made pieces delivered in bespoke packages and some great memories.
    Cazz on the other hand, covers her costs handsomely and very often the clients will also buy from her shop at the same premises. The night-classes are her most lucrative - very often, small groups of 40-somethings just want to have a glass of wine and do something fun (not involving strippers etc) and they will pay high prices. I'm talking about small groups of friends who one week may book out a spa-treatment day and then another week may book a local private swimming pool. There are plenty such groups in most towns and more in big cities.

    The kids daytime classes are hard work and don't pay as much but Cazz loves working with children.
    My students use her workshops too, 3 times a year but the college pays for our access and damaged equipment is replaced quickly.

    Our town is too small for two such workshops, my partner has now seen that it works and so I'm looking to retire in the next 6 years and maybe buy a run down property in the South of France and do that up towards my dream. It probably will have computers and digital screens if not ceramics and printing but it won't be free access - just so equipment can be replaced.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2020
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  9. crazycat

    crazycat Scribbler - Standard Member

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    That is practically what this manga artist personal studio office looks like, (without the recording studio). Just saw this video yesterday by coincidence.



    In this video I spotted 3 Cintiq 22HD, 1 Cintiq 24( or 32?) Pro. 2 Wacom MSP 13 or 16. 1 Surface pro. He also bring an Ipad Pro with Apple pencil to editor meeting.

    And this is a home office, not a big studio firm. And there are countless manga artist work from home and hire assistant like this in Japan. Now we know who Wacom sell their expensive monitor to in Japan.
     
  10. djas

    djas Graffiti User

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    And an LG Velvet with the dual-screen case, at the restaurant? Great video!
     
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