What art apps do you use on your Note?

Discussion in 'Samsung Galaxy Note and Tab' started by RZetlin, Apr 30, 2014.

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  1. fishdavis

    fishdavis Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Your tablet's a LOT more powerful than mine, so might explain IP not lagging :) It used to run pretty smoothly on my Note 10 though (it's the original one, not the 2014).

    Are you sure it's not the fake pressure sensitivity that uses the stroke acceleration? I've seen pretty good pressure sensitivity imitation with stroke acceleration, also the overall time of the stroke. Tripped me out a bit at first when I saw it as the tapering was very convincing.
     
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  2. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    Many years of dedicated art works means that you've developed as an artist, pressure sensitive fingers is just the latest update in Stoneseeker 2.3.
     
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  3. fishdavis

    fishdavis Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Stoneseeker 2.3: EMR/human gestalt
     
  4. stoneseeker

    stoneseeker Animator and Art Director Senior Member

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    hah, NO! :rolleyes: seriously guys! Go try this! I am flabbergasted ATM. There must be some simple explanation but I cant think of any. I just tried again with my finger to eleminate the stroke speed fake pressure possability. I dragged my finger at a consistent speed the whole time but changed the pressure as I went without effecting speed. I got a thin to thick line that reflected my fingers pressure across the even speed stroke! :eek:

    I did it again this time with multiple strokes at the same slow speed but adjusting pressure for each stroke. The hard pressure strokes of the same speed were bigger and darker, and the thin strokes were my lighter pressure strokes of the same speed. :confused:

    Someone join this convo who can solve this mystery?!? Is the Samsung s-pen and wacom digitizer different than other devices?? Perhaps this is why their tablets are so thin?? and their pen is so dinky? maybe its not all determined in the pen coil like larger wacom pens?? The device is certainly interpreting the pressure my finger is applying to the screen. How could it be fooling me?
     
  5. ron2k_1

    ron2k_1 calibuchi Senior Member

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    I don't have the full version but when I try the limited version on my Note 4 my finger gives me the consistent maximum pressure. No pressure variation as result of finger stroke speed/pressure. Which brush were you using. I tried both pencil and regular brush (the freebie only gives me 1 brush).

    Swiped from my Galaxy Note 4 using Tapatalk
     
  6. stoneseeker

    stoneseeker Animator and Art Director Senior Member

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    strange. I used the watercolor brush and the pencil, but any brush set to pressure works. The pressure is not as smooth as the pen (which makes sense) but it's still very obviously there. Maybe I'll make a video when I get a chance.
     
  7. Precurve

    Precurve Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I don't have your specific devices to test but its possible that Samsung is interpreting the *change* in the capacitive patch (surface area of touch between finger and screen), made by the finger tip, as pressure. The contact area would grow or shrink based on pressure. I'm not saying this is how its done but I can speculate that as a possible explanation if this isn't just a figment of your very powerful creative imagination and unquenchable desire for expression through pressure sensitivity. If you have a plastic disc stylus (Dagi or jot) you could test it to see if the same patch area with increased pressure results in a stroke change - that seems extremely unlikely.
     
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  8. stoneseeker

    stoneseeker Animator and Art Director Senior Member

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    I don't, but is there some conductive object lying around the house that would work in a similar manner to test your theory? Your theory makes sense, and could be a genius method of pressure sensitivity that Infinite Painter has made available to all tablets with touch.
    My "unquenchable desire for expression through pressure sensitivity" is most certainly my greatest bane! (and time waster) :)
     
  9. fishdavis

    fishdavis Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I was actually wondering the same thing as Precurve. You can try a bag of chips, the mylar should be conductive (I made a temporary stylus brush out of this once) http://blog.lenovo.com/en/blog/holidayhacks-create-your-own-potato-chip-bag-stylus
     
  10. Precurve

    Precurve Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Well speaking of unquenchable thirst for pressure sensitivity and penabled tablets, it takes one to know one... the first step is admitting you have a problem. This image does not include my recent acquisition of the Wacom AES w/Encore nor a handful of styluses I have lost or given away or all the backup pens for my Gateway 140.

    Stylus-Collection-0651_1k.jpg

    The ones on the far right are made with a small metal button threaded by fishing line through a simple aluminum tube and tied off with aluminum tape. One of them is made with a folded bit of aluminum foil - like a brush. I made these when the ipad first came out and it was hard to find a commercial capacitive stylus for iPad. But, if you had a metal button around or a folded bit of aluminum foil you could push it with your finger and it would maintain a constant contact patch. Obviously the button shouldn't have any sharp edges, but these never scratched my iPad screen. You can see a few of them are wrapped with thin cloth - that was to improve the feel not protect the screen

    BTW: The Encore Trupen Wacom AES stylus has quenched my thirst. Although I do like some apps on the iPad quite a bit and hope for an iPad pressure sensitive stylus
     
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