Wacom experiencing Hard Times...

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by thatcomicsguy, Mar 14, 2017.

  1. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I remember I postulated this idea when the first Companion was announced.....but 3 gens in....I really still wonder if the Companions and Mobile Studio Pro's would have been better sellers (and have better Quality Control) if Wacom had partnered directly with Samsung for their creation. Like if the original Companion was a joint wacom/samsung device.....priced more affordable over wacom's prices (4GB, 64GB, i3, for $1500).....and sold in Bestbuys & Staples all over the US. GIven all the design issues and flaws Wacom has had with the companions....having Samsung....(who at the time had more experience with building windows devices..) in charge of the hardware end.....they could avoided alot of those early issues and be looked at more favorably to many. I mean there are alot of digital masochists on this board who have been burned by Wacom and still went back.....and back again.....but just as many have no doubt been burned and never looked back.
     
  2. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    Not everyone that works with images need a wide gamut (10 bit) display. Actually I'm not even sure how many really need it. Certainly not the artsy kind like illustrators or 3D modelers/sculptors.

    I'm more concerned of being able to have a good warm white point, consistency in grays, the ability to display a white to black gradient without banding and other artifacts, an even display luminosity and so on than being able to paint in colors that I will never be able to print or display on a normal screen. ;)

    Compared to those two the display of the surface pro 3 to make an example was pure rubbish.


    Edit:
    Let me also add that a true, professional 27" wide gamut display like a Nec or Eizo costs as much as the Cintiq itself...
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2017
  3. rebelismo

    rebelismo Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Is it safe to say that Wacom has essentially been shipping the same product for years? At this point I have owned quite a few of their products, but I certainly haven't felt the need to upgrade to another Wacom produced device from the 21UX. They get top marks for durability, but their value/innovation could use quite a lot of work. The color and resolution always improve slightly, but the overall experience has stayed pretty much the same (for better or worse). Their most innovative feature lately has been the capture of real ink, and that doesn't seem to be quite there yet.

    I want them to succeed, but I think they need to focus on their value offering. Too bad that report says: "1. Focus on Profits" :D. Business-speak is hilarious. A lot of these reports don't ask: "How can we offer something incredible to our customers?", but they definitely concentrate on: "How can we extract more money from our customers?". This is funny and depressing at the same time.
     
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  4. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    Strangely enough, Japanese companies' forte is putting their customers first. In the West, "customer is king" is replaced by "customer is God" in Japan. When you consider that kings ruled with the grace of God the customer is clearly more important in Japan. However, since the Lehman crash, profits everywhere is down, and even Japanese companies has to pay their corporate mortgages.

    Sent from my GT-N8010 using Tapatalk 4
     
  5. rebelismo

    rebelismo Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Actually, as an artist why wouldn't you want a wider gamut? Color science is incredibly complex, but I'm not sure how a wider gamut and 10bit+ would hurt. Especially if you don't want banding. sRGB/Rec709 (for people who deal with renders and footage) and 8bit are actually incredibly limiting, and don't always hold enough data to create the best possible picture quality as values get clipped. We finally have manufacturers working with HDR10 and Dolby Vision, and they're on their way to Rec2020. Some content creation companies are even working with encoding systems that go beyond what we can see, just to ensure that their color work is future-proof. I understand that wider gamut/more bits would mean having to deal with more data, but at the same time it would allow for much better images.
     
  6. DRTigerlilly

    DRTigerlilly Tablet Lead Mod (Retired) Super Moderator

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    It would also help if they actually supported the products they licensed, but between them & their OEM's everyone plays pass the buck.
    *rant off*
     
  7. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    Why would I want to work using a gamut that's so much wider than cmyk complicating my life?


    Or lets say I nonetheless decide to work directly in Adobe rgb instead of srgb and create images as colourful and rich as I could ever get: who will ever see that richness aside me, since the rest of the world lives in the srgb color space?
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2017
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  8. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    That's true, lots of artists prefer sRGB because most monitors and most print shops use that color profile, and converting work from wide gamut to sRGB is another step that is very easy to mess up.

    There were times when you had to get a NEC or Eizo for that wide gamut goodness, but for the past 10 years there have been excellent monitors that provide nearly the same performance for a fraction of the price, like the 10-bit wide-gamut Dell Ultrasharp models, and even the 8-bit Ultrasharp models. (Beware the 6-bit Dell Ultrasharps! Beware 6-bit displays in general.)
     
  9. rebelismo

    rebelismo Pen Pal - Newbie

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    To experience all the depth and beauty that life has to offer of course :D. I would say that wider gamuts offer better future proofing, and more vibrant colors (for additive color). Yes, a lot of displays right now are sRGB, but they won't stay like that forever. At the same time, it's easier to clip data rather than the other way around. In essence, you end up with more options for yourself and your clients. The Surface Studio has a very nice DCI-P3 mode, and I've seen HDR being introduced into more Windows 10 devices. Whether you're working with additive or subtractive color, I personally believe that it's good to know where the boundaries are, but that's of course just a personal opinion :).
     
  10. rebelismo

    rebelismo Pen Pal - Newbie

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    So they're even more hardcore about customer service? I didn't know that. Though I wonder if it'd be better for Wacom to go private like Dell did in 2013. Maybe this is biased but it seems that Dell is actually bringing interesting devices to the market nowadays.
     
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