Wacom Cintiq Pro 24 Options Worthwhile? (Touch and Pro Engine)

Discussion in 'Artists' started by IAmTheChin, Oct 4, 2018.

  1. IAmTheChin

    IAmTheChin Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi Guys,

    I saw another beast of a thread regarding the Pro 24 but it was a bit difficult to comb through. Basically I'm looking to get the Cintiq Pro 24 and wasn't sure about the Touch vs. Non-Touch options and the need for a pro engine? I opened this thread to discuss the values in these options (are they worth it?)

    My main programs are Photoshop and Illustrator with the bulk of my illustrations in vector line work. I don't need mobility. I used to hand illustrate, scan, and then vectorize everything to digital for post. I currently use a laptop running 16GB RAM and Intel i7 CPU @ 1.80 GHz. I understand that different professions will value different options differently so that's sort of where I'm operating from for context.
    Secret time: Even though this is my job I'm embarrassed to admit I've done everything with mouse up until now. This will be my first tablet so I'm not sure what's marketing fluff out there and what's necessary for my needs. I'm looking to you experts out on the field for a bit of help!

    Basically do I need a Cintiq Pro Engine if I run off a laptop (with above specs)?
    Is the workflow efficiency better if I upgrade to a touch model if I will primarily draw with Illustrator and Photoshop?


    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. CreateNowSleepLater

    CreateNowSleepLater Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Lets deal with the simple questions. You dont need the Cintiq engine. It is a very expensive PC.

    If your current rig runs the programs you want, they will work fine on the Cintiq 24.

    ...except if your rig does not have the capibility to run 4K. The Cintiq Pro 24 comes with display port, usb C and HDMI. If your rig will not run 4K, you can just run a lower rez.

    The touch is a nice to have to a VERY nice to have. The Cintiq comes with the express key remote (see the review on my channel on how to config for photoshop). You can zoom and rotate with the express key remote.

    Efficiency is subjective for you since you have never used a tablet. For me, I would rather pinch, rotate and zoom right on the screen. Plus, I like using the touchscreen for basic windows instead of the pen. I have my 24 touch now and I should have a review up this weekend. Just google my username.

    You sure are jumping in for your first device!
     
  3. IAmTheChin

    IAmTheChin Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Thanks. I wasn't sure if the engine was going to be an issue since I'm using a laptop instead of a desktop so that's great to know.

    So the touch value is more for ease in navigation than anything else for you?
    Doesn't the ExpressKey remote come with both the touch and non-touch? (If this is the case at what point are you using the actual touch capability if you're operating everything through the remote?
    Efficiency for me is any tricks to speed up production, (that definitely includes navigation like you're describing).
    Since the majority of my time is using the pen tool in Illustrator would touch have any value or would you still be using the tablet pen that entire time for precision?

    Thanks for the insight. I'll look out for your video review.
     
    CreateNowSleepLater likes this.
  4. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    My experience with illustrator: better with a mouse. Not worth using a Cintiq for that.
     
  5. IAmTheChin

    IAmTheChin Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Is the mouse just more intuitive?

    The illustrations I do I prefer cleaner hatching and more standard line width which is why I've always done mouse than what you get with variable width lines in a hand drawn image. But each line is literally 3 actions with the pen tool to be that precise and is time consuming in comparison to one single hand stroke. Now that I'm producing a bit more I was looking into ways to speed up illustrating. If it literally means learning how to draw precise with tablet I'm okay with that. I'm just looking to learn best practice to save time in the long haul.

    Not the best representation but I pulled a quick recent file of a vector line base that I do before I bring it into Photoshop for quick gradients/etc. Is this normal that people do this with mouse consistently or is this pretty standard for tablet and people are just doing this kind of work by hand in straight into Photoshop? I come from an architecture background where everything needs to be precise but I'm beginning to think that these kinds of illustrations don't necessarily need to be exact and vector?
     

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  6. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    In your case a Cintiq then will be fine. ;)
    When you need to select and move control points and handles around I found having your hand covering things to be a big pain in illustrator
     
  7. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I really think you need to try someone's graphic screen tablet before you ever put down the kind of money a Cintiq or anything similar will give you. None are perfect, whether AES or EMR, all have some kind of line wobble or sacrificial downside no matter how much you spend to buy it.
    The engraved look you're going for is something I ended up walking away from Cintiq style screens for a while for and I'm not going back. My solution for that type of drawing has been to go back to technical pen / clutch pencil and high quality scanner to then trace with illustrator. Drawing those kinds of lines on a graphic screen tablet has (for me) been a special kind of torture.

    So, basically - try before you buy. The kind of money you're talking about for that type of linework is huge if you end up being so frustrated that your huge expensive tablet ends up being a simple monitor while you go back to mouse based drawing.
     
    thatcomicsguy likes this.
  8. ticol

    ticol Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I agree. Maybe you can find a used cintiq of older generation. It will be way cheaper and will let you learn to like it (or not).
    Drawing on a screen is really different than on paper, so there's a learning curve that can be done with an older model.
    Then you'll know if you want to upgrade.
    I mainly draw on cintiq or tablets but I remember my first experience as being painful for my back and very frustrating the first weeks :)
     
  9. IAmTheChin

    IAmTheChin Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Definitely good advice. My hesitation to try out an older model is that the parallax is the thing I'm worried about so it'd be misrepresenting the experience I would be adapting to. Hearing that the Pro 24 supposedly has the best solution to that problem is when I recently began entertaining the idea of getting a tablet.
    Do you guys know of places you would be able to test these models out in person? I originally asked around but they're surprisingly hard to find any floor models just to see in person (hence the opening of this thread here).
     
  10. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    That's why Amazon exists: buy what you want and then if you don't like it send it back. It's in your rights.
    Amazon was even so kind as to refund me for the Cintiq 27 Touch after TWO months since it wasn't perfect...
     
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