Wacom Bamboo Feel Pen - Carbon

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Steve S, Jan 15, 2013.

  1. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    This will be short and to the point: I received my Wacom Bamboo "Feel" pen last night. For no particular reason, I bought the carbon-fiber model, which is the most expensive (at $80) and the heaviest (at 28 grams or ~ 1 ounce) version of the pen. There are also "Black" and "White" models that have plain barrels in the indicated colors; they are both lighter and cheaper than the Carbon.

    The pen is supplied in a nice box with a magnetic closure flap. Inside, the buyer receives the pen, a set of instructions and a pack containing 4 replacement nibs (2 hard plastic white and 2 black with the rubber tip... I think... and a nib-puller ring).

    The pen itself is very nicely made, as one would expect for the price. The barrel is smooth and the single "right click" side switch fits flush with the surface. The pen does not feature an eraser on the opposite end. The cap clicks on, both over the front end and the rear end; it is nicely designed, with a nicely shaped (and sturdy) pocket clip. However, the cap is also the heaviest part of the pen, by a noticeable amount, and my first impression is that it somewhat spoils the balance of the pen when it is on the rear; the pen feels just a bit "tail heavy." Used without the cap, the pen alone feels light and agile.

    As Wacom alluded, the pen is compatible with my older Wacom tablets. I test drove it on my Samsung Series 7 Slate, and it worked fine. When I tried to fire up my HP/Compaq TC1100, I found that the battery was nearly exhausted, so I'll have to try that device tonight after it has recharged. The pen works and feels like any other Wacom pen. Pressure sensitivity was just a little heavy for my taste, but the pen easily drew lines of different weights including line with smoothly varying weight depending upon nib pressure. The pen seemed to be compatible with my existing digitizer calibration (that is, I did not need to recalibrate my screen). The cursor was either right under the pen tip (barrel nearly perpendicular to the screen), or displaced by no more than a millimeter or two (barrel in a typical writing position). When leaned over to a ridiculous angle (barrel nearly parallel to the screen), the cursor was displaced by several millimeters, but what else would you expect?

    So, is this pen worth $80? No, unless you value form over function. However, the pen is well made, comfortable in the hand (except for that slight balance thing), and it works exactly the way you would expect a Wacom pen to work. Perhaps that last thing is the best thing of all...!



    ADDENDUM

    A few images to complement the description above:


    The nice package that the Bamboo Feel arrives in:
    [​IMG]


    The Carbon pen and pen cap. Note the flush-mounted single side switch:
    [​IMG]


    A close-up of the nib with rubber tip; I think this is the "Flex" nib. On a screen covered by a screen protector, this nib is too draggy (the white hard-plastic standard nib works better). However, on a bare glass screen, this rubber-tipped nib has a nice feel. It's not like pencil-on-paper, though; more like a rollerball on paper:
    [​IMG]

    As promised, I fired up my TC1100 this evening and tested the Bamboo Feel pen on it. Of course, it worked OK. I used Journal and verified that, once again, I had pressure sensitivity. As noted above in the close-up image of the tip, the rubber-tipped "Flex" nib is just a little two draggy when used on a screen protector. I tried the pen on both 3M Vikuiti and on Clarivue Ultra-Clear, and the inking had too much resistance. On a bare glass (Gorilla Glass 2, if it makes any difference) screen, however, the rubber-tipped nib felt nice. Not like a pencil, but more like a rollerball or gel pen.

    I pulled the nib and replaced it with one of the white, hard-plastic nibs. The nib fit tightly and required a bit of gentle pressure to seat completely. When properly inserted in the pen body, the nib projects out only about 1/10 inch or less and you can definitely feel when the nib fully engages in the pen body. As expected, the plastic tip felt smoother on the screen protectors, with a more agreeable level of inking resistance. On the Gorilla glass screen, it felt absolutely slick.

    Although both nibs are interesting, I will probably end up using a Hard Felt nib in the pen; my experience is that although the HF nib wears more quickly, it feels better on both bare glass and screen protector-covered screens. Of course, that's just personal preference; YMMV.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2015
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  2. stoneseeker

    stoneseeker Animator and Art Director Senior Member

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    Thanks for the review!

    It's too bad it doesn't have the eraser and a second button... otherwise it looks really nice. I wonder if another batch of Axiotron Modbook pens will ever get made. I'm so scared of breaking or losing mine, since I'll have no way to replace it!
     
  3. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Even if it only had a second button to use as an eraser, that would be preferable. It's probably just me, but I've never really had the greatest luck with the scratch-out gesture. (I know you can use a single line on the TIP, but I mean in OneNote).

    Still, if the Surface Pro ends up using Wacom, I might pick one of these up anyway, because it does look really nice otherwise.
     
  4. Steve B

    Steve B Moderator Moderator

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    It's very weird to me that they would produce a premiere-priced pen like this but not make it kick *ss. Why no second button or eraser? I agree. I'd pay a premium for a nicely weighted, professional looking pen, if it had those basic, additionally functional features.
     
  5. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    (Bump)

    ...Added a few images to the root post and some additional comments. The Bamboo Feel pen is compatible with all tabletPCs that use Wacom digitizers. I will be interested to see if it works on the Surface Pro.

    The Wacom Bamboo Solo, a capacitive pen, works on any capacitive (touch-sensitive) screen. The Wacom Bamboo Feel, the pen described here, only works with tablets that have a Wacom active digitizer.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2015
  6. gatehouse

    gatehouse Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Dear Steve

    Is is possible that Stylus feel will be compatible with Fujitsu T901?

    Many thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2015
  7. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...Is is possible that Stylus feel will be compatible with Fujitsu T901?..>>

    gate: If the T901 uses a Wacom digitizer (which I think it does...) then the Bamboo Feel pen will be compatible.

    Note that since writing the original post in this thread, I've noticed that the Feel Carbon pen feels a little too heavy (due to its solid build) in my hand. If you think that weight might be an issue for you, you might consider the Feel Black or Feel White instead. They are the same pen, but made from lighter materials...
     
  8. gatehouse

    gatehouse Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Personally I am into this product mainly due to rubber-tipped flex nib with the same functionality(EMR) which may be applied among many legacy Tablet PC Laptops.

    This is a great relief to hear from your answer, despite the fact that the compatibility list is limited to less than 10 items, which is quite disappointing.

    Many Thanks
     
  9. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I remember way back in the beginning of my comics-making job, I went out and bought a top of the line Staedtler mechanical pencil. It had a nice weight, was made of heavy machined parts, and when you took it apart, it didn't have any cheap plastic bits inside like regular mechanical pencils. I loved it, and used it for years until the day I dropped it one too many times and broke the tip.

    But it was $80 well spent!

    I don't think I'd do the same with a Wacom pen like the one in this review simply because it wouldn't fit into the convenient stylus garage on the side of my Tablet PC, but I'm all about honoring your craft, (and ego?) with a beautiful writing instrument. It just makes the whole work process feel more sacred.
     
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  10. remi.vfx

    remi.vfx Pen Pal - Newbie

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    i am a rotring colectioner i know what You mean

     
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