Very Confused! Does moving Recovery Partition to USB works or not???

Discussion in 'Dell' started by 8inches, Mar 5, 2014.

  1. 8inches

    8inches Scribbler - Standard Member

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    (Update: Yes, moving Recovery Partition does work. But you must not use Dell's tool to do it. See http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/del...claim-up-6-gb-without-3rd-party-software.html)


    I start off reading this post:

    http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/dell/59590-things-do-when-you-get-your-tablet.html

    Which it has a section on "regain the recovery partition".

    And then it has a link to this post:

    http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/dell/59202-venue-8-pro-owner-s-lounge-247.html#post354576

    dprice7 wrote:
    But then, I also found this:

    Venue 8 Pro - Backup & Recovery Software Incompatible - Mobile Devices Forum - Mobile Devices - Dell Community

    Luminosus wrote:

    Huh?

    Then I do more digging and found:

    http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/del...overy-partition-then-deleted-your-system.html

    volumnus wrote

    Now you are saying you can recover within Windows?

    But wait:

    http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/dell/60986-venue-8-pro-can-t-boot-up.html

    dlgreg wrote:
    Okay, I give up! Does USB recovery work or not?

    If USB recovery works, why would anyone go through this much trouble to reset to factory default?

    http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/del...ng-factory-backup-image-dell-venue-8-pro.html
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2015
  2. dprice7

    dprice7 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I definitely ran the recovery image from the USB backup I made. My first Venue 8 Pro developed a defective screen, so I had to return it. I had previously removed the recovery partition from the internal storage. Before I sent it back to Dell, I had used the USB recovery image to restore it to factory fresh. Here's the post where I detailed (as best I could remember) what I did:

    http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/dell/59202-venue-8-pro-owner-s-lounge-82.html#post361410
     
  3. 8inches

    8inches Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Does it mean that you have to start from a working Windows installation. If your Windows won't boot and you don't have Recovery Partition, you can't boot to USB and install without power?

    I am curious why there is conflicting information floating around. Could it be there different BIOS or different Windows updates make a difference?
     
  4. dprice7

    dprice7 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I believe you can boot to USB without a working windows if you go into the bios manually (I think its holding down one of the volume buttons while powering on). The rest of the steps should be the same from the bios onward.

    Sent from my SM-N900T using Tapatalk
     
  5. gammite

    gammite Scribbler - Standard Member

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    did it require that u be connected to a power source. I was under the impression that the reset wouldn't start otherwise.
     
  6. dprice7

    dprice7 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    When I did the restore from USB, I was not connected to power. I think it only enforces that requirement if you boot from the internal storage.. The key (I believe) is booting to the USB recovery image before starting the recovery.

    Sent from my SM-N900T using Tapatalk
     
  7. St. Lamar

    St. Lamar Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I also created recovery media on USB from inside Windows. Search for the exact phrase "recovery drive" and select "Create a Recovery Drive." On this screen, you can also elect not to include the recovery partition from the hard drive - in other words - just create a simple bootable repair drive to mount a Windows recovery environment. As in previous versions, it starts out looking a bit like the Windows Installer, but you can select "Advanced" in one of the screens and then be given the option of selecting the backed up recovery media on the stick or a complete system image found on an attached USB drive.

    I did reboot (Dell logo - Vol minus + power held down until the boot menu appears) to get to the startup menu and select the flash drive, all the way to selecting the recovery media (on my external hard drive), but didn't actually continue to overwrite my SSD.

    It never asked me to plug in as far as I went.
     
  8. St. Lamar

    St. Lamar Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Update. I tried the same thing using the Dell utility in "My Dell" to create the rescue USB. It also copied the maintenance partition and when run, offered to restore the Windows-created system image on the attached hard drive. It DID stop and ask to be plugged in when I started the restoration. (I had just created that system image, so it was OK to test). So when using the Windows-made recovery USB, it did not ask for the plug, but using the Dell-made recovery USB, it did ask for the plug. This is rather useless on the V8P if the image is on another drive hooked up to the tablet by USB.
     
  9. Renaldo868

    Renaldo868 Pen Pal - Newbie

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  10. St. Lamar

    St. Lamar Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I'm not sure that the step-by-step linked above is preferable to creating a complete system image using Windows built-in utility and creating a bootable USB to access it through a by-now familiar Windows recovery environment. I think it has a few advantages. First, it doesn't require any third-party software. Second, it works the same way it did in Windows 7, although I did make sure then to have some bootable DVDs around and we've moved on the flash drives now. Third, there's nothing to download; all the software is already on the device and backup and recovery actually DO WORK when there are problems.

    Disadvantages include the fact that Microsoft says that system images are deprecated, so the ability will be removed at some time. I think that the backup scheme in Windows Vista, 7, and 8 has never been really user-friendly in a general sense. Of course, this left room for third-party solutions (like Macrium Reflect) to try to make the process easier. I've used Acronis True Image to clone laptop drives and tried using it for backup, but it had some pretty arcane settings and it left room for third-party step-throughs just to explain what the instructions meant. :)

    Is anybody interested in my writing up a step-through about using an external hard drive and a 8 GB flash drive to create a Windows system image and restoring the V8Pro using it?
     
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