vaio canvas 2nd edition

Discussion in 'VAIO / Sony' started by jbaks, Aug 25, 2016.

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  1. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    The other-than-art pen-device market. I have no sales data or market research data, but look at the products:

    Pen tablets 13.3" and higher:
    • MobileStudio Pro 16 - art
    • Surface Book - business / high-end consumer
    • MobileStudio Pro 13 - art
    • Fujitsu Stylistic Q737 - business
    12.6" and lower:
    • Transformer 3 Pro, Transformer Pro - high-end consumer
    • Fujitsu Stylistic R727 - industrial
    • Surface Pro 4, Miix 510, Miix 720, Panasonic CF-XZ6H, Aspire Switch Alpha 12 - business / high-end consumer
    All the high-end consumer devices are bunched at the 12" size, notable exception is the Surface Book, but the Book is actually mainly a notebook, not a tablet. With pen laptops, the products are all bunched at the 13.3" size, with a few 12.5" and a few 14" and 15.6".

    This really doesn't prove anything, but seems like under 12.6" is the popular tablet size for other-than-art markets.
     
  2. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    The popular sub-12.5" tablet size (with current technology) isn't well suited for full-voltage, quad-core CPUs. Dual-core ULV would be the optimal performance, battery-life, size/weight ratio.

    From VAIO's marketing towards "Creators", and the "Monster PC" specs of the Z Canvas itself, it is clearly meant as workstation tablet for professional graphics work (art, photo-editing, video production, etc).

    In other words, the Z Canvas is not intended as a Surface Pro clone, but rather a tablet alternative to other quad-core laptops used by creative professionals (high-end MacBook Pros, XPS, etc).
     
  3. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    In that case if they just want to compete with the MobileStudio Pro then they've already lost.
     
  4. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    But by that logic, they shouldn't have even made the Canvas 1 in the first place.

    I think reason why we are all so passionate and grateful for this product, is that VAIO aimed to and succeeded in producing such a stellar device for our oft-neglected 'creator' niche.
     
  5. FenderP

    FenderP Scribbler - Standard Member

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    As I've said elsewhere and probably somewhere already in this thead, the ZC was Vaio's first real net new computer. When they split from Sony, all they basically had was revamps of the Pro 11/13. It was massively touted at the Adobe conference in fall of 2014, went on a tour of Japan in December, and then was finally released in June of 2015. It was a statement, not unlike, say, the old U series - or even the Duo. But that doesn't translate to profits or viability to keep making it. For all intents and purposes, it pretty much flopped in the US (see: fire sales early on) for many reasons, and I have no idea what sales numbers were in Japan.

    Will Vaio always make something weird from time to time like the ZC? I think so. But we're most likely NOT getting a refresh and I'm not really bothered by it. They had the chutzpah to get it out there, but no one really cared nor understood how it was better than a SP3 which is much less in terms of cost. You can't fight that.

    Vaio has now trended towards more consumer machines (see the new C line in Japan). I don't fault them. The ZC was a statement that said "VAIO IS BACK". I applaud them for doing it. I didn't hesitate to buy ti.
     
  6. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    When Vaio revealed the Canvas at the end of 2014, Wacom only had their Companion out and it wasn't a great device. The Canvas was a far better-designed product, outmatching the Companion in every category except the pen, and there the Companion had edge accuracy issues and an LCD air-gap that led to pen-cursor parallax, so the Canvas was competitive. The CC2 improved the display and CPU, but not much else.

    MobileStudio Pro fixed nearly all of the Companions' flaws. With Wacom's brand recognition and their finally-improved EMR tech, any art-minded buyer will choose Wacom over Vaio.

    On the other hand, the market for Surface Pro clones is much larger, and may have room for a quad-core Surface Pro clone.
     
  7. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Assuming VAIO tries to switch to the Surface Pro clone market, what size/weight and screen area do you think they should aim for? (As an alternative to the 7 x 11mm chassis expansion for the 14" screen.)

    As @FenderP has stated many times, the ZC is actually quite large and heavy when compared to the SP4. It also suffers from weaker battery life vs other dual-core machines. And which SP users are going to pay $2500-3500, when a high-end $1250-1750 dual-core would suffice? Only the tiny fraction of users who require quad-core.

    Whereas if you compare the proposed ZC2 to the MSP13/16, the advantages to any mobile graphics professional become very clear: same price point, but you get quiet quad-core performance, and more/comparable drawing area in a far more portable form factor.

    I would also like to point out, this is not exactly an either/or dilemma: how many performance-minded SP4-clone users (besides @FenderP of course ;)) would be so turned off by a SB-sized ZC2 that they would not even consider it? I think a slightly larger ZC2 would have a decent shot at both niches of general power-users and pro artists.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2017
  8. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    And regarding this comment, I will reserve judgement until I see the performance of the SP5 digitizer and pen.

    However, judging from the very positive reception of the Surface Studio, I would say many artists are actually willing to forego the absolute best pen performance for other best-in-class features.
     
  9. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    At that price, you're right, but there's no reason Vaio can't cut down costs for a 2nd-generation product, providing they keep the exact same design.
     
  10. FenderP

    FenderP Scribbler - Standard Member

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    First off, I don't like the SP3 or 4. Let's get that straight :)

    The ZC has decent battery life - I can get between 5 and 6h on normal tasks with Word and such. That said, the SP line and ultrabooks get 7+. This all goes back to people couldn't tell the difference between the SP and the ZC ... except the price. Very few reviews in the US pointed out it had a quad core (and to Marty's point, most people don't care). It was just a) more expensive than the SP b) had worse battery life. Stick the fork in it. It had NO chance. Don't forget the fact that it was introduced here after the newer SP came out (IIRC the SP4 at the time).

    It's interesting that Panasonic made more of a SB clone, just smaller, and didn't go tthe SP-like route most people have chosen.

    I still live and hope someone will make a newer quad core, smaller machine with 32GB of memory that can do inking for presentations.

    I would rather see Vaio do more of a SB clone with ZC-like guts. They nearly have that now in the Flip. That would be a more realistic expectation if you ask me.
     
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