Ubuntu

Discussion in 'EP121 Slate' started by Mrono, Sep 28, 2011.

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  1. Mrono

    Mrono Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Has anyone installed ubuntu and been successfully using it on their ep121? How well does it handle the hardware buttons, on-screen keyboard, touch/pen input, ACPI, etc?
     
  2. YetAnotherDave

    YetAnotherDave Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Just curious, why the heck would you want to run a UNIX OS on the ep121?? I mean, the main selling point of the system is it's Windows compatibility.

    That being said, my guess is you should be able to get ubuntu working at a basic level, but you'll be breaking new ground when it comes to the more specific hardware features that people buy this slate to gain access to.

    My suggestion would be to look at running other operating systems inside a virtual machine.
     
  3. AbeOwitz

    AbeOwitz Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I've successfully installed Linux Mint, and other than the touch screen, it works quite well with MyPaint and Gimp.

    If you email me at gmail (same account name), I can give you details. People who equate computers with Microsoft won't understand...
     
  4. CF77

    CF77 Love Tablet. Senior Member

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    Why don't you post your hows with screen shots? It will help those who are interested.. It is a choice..
     
  5. kamikaze458

    kamikaze458 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I disagree: the EP121 is a full featured PC WITH some extra features. Installing linux (for example a dual boot) wont eliminate the features under windows 7. Linux is a great operating system. I did use it a lot.
    BTW, linux is capable of handling any hw device. Obviously, it has the con that SOMETIMES you have to read a lot to get it to work. Sadly, we dont always have the time to do it. But you learn a lot in the procces :)
     
  6. AbeOwitz

    AbeOwitz Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Alrighty, here are a few notes:

    1) Install Linux from bootable USB stick. So, you'll need a USB hub, keyboard, mouse and USB stick. You can use the pen for the install, but do NOT touch the screen. When I tested Ubuntu 11.10 Alpha, touching the screen hung the Xorg input queue.


    2) After you install, login and setup your bluetooth keyboard. Once you have it paired, add a similar line to /etc/default/bluetooth: (Substitute your keyboard MAC)

    HIDD_OPTIONS="-connect 7C:ED:8D:XX:XX:XX -master -server"

    This will allow the bluetooth keyboard to be always connected. (It will sleep now & then. I believe it is configurable.)


    3) I suggest you install Florence, the onscreen keyboard, as GOK is a bit buggy. Since I'm now using Linux Mint LDE, which uses GDM3. While in the GDM login, configure the assistant to use the onscreen keyboard and Florence will be optional for passwords.

    - Florence will hang around after login, still using the GDM permissions. So, add this to kill it:

    Add "killall florence" to /etc/gdm3/PostLogin/Default

    - Florence does not work for screensaver passwords. Have not figured that out yet.


    4) Suspend works great, no problems. Have not tried hibernate, but make sure you have at least 4G of swap when you install.


    5) The touchpad doesn't work right for me at all, so I just turn it off. You can try the latest drivers from eGalax_eMPIA Technology Inc. TouchKit Linux Driver They did respond to my email, but they didn't seem to fix my problem.

    Enh, touchscreen gets in the way of drawing anyway.

    To turn off the touchscreen, add this line to /etc/gdm3/Init/Default

    /bin/touchscreen_off.pl &

    Then create and make that script executable:

    The touchscreen will turn back on after returning from suspend, so I added a desktop icon to launch the script.

    If you guys get the touchscreen working, please share. I'd like to figure out how to turn it on/off when the pen is active.


    6) Volume ACPI key works as expected. Others do not have an effect. Haven't dug deep enough to assign functions to them, as they are ACPI events, not keystrokes.

    The centered button works as 'Enter' on boot. Use the Volume buttons to change the Grub menu options.


    7) The Intel driver in Xorg does support screen rotate via xrandr, and I've tested it, however this is not automatic, nor do I know how to use the gravity/rotation sensor. It would also be necessary to tell the wacom and touch drivers about the new screen dimensions.

    The Xrandr switch is about 1 sec, faster than Windows. :)


    8) There is a hardware latency between the wacom pen movement and cursor location. The same delays are in Windows and Linux. This seems to be more of a Wacom/Asus firmware problem, not an application or driver problem.

    I used Windows to install the latest Wacom drivers from Asus and Wacom, but apparently there weren't any firmware updates.

    Email replies from Wacom told me to contact Asus as this was an Asus product. I'm sure Asus will point me back to Wacom. :/

    It's annoying when drawing, kinda like listening to your voice echo on a phone call.


    9) There are also Wacom location discrepencies at the screen edges. No doubt caused by RF interference or shielding affects. (Note the wide border around external Wacom pads.) Not much can be done with this, but it could be solved with a non linear transform. However, for art, it's not a big deal if you work mostly in the center of the screen.

    It can be a pain when trying to move scrollbars on the screen edges.


    10) Other than that, wireless, sound, graphics, USB, etc all work well. 4G is plenty for Linux even with large graphics. Performance is excellent.

    I've upgraded to the 128G SSD mentioned on this forum and disk speed is almost 2X faster.

    Removing the back can be a pain, I broke off one of the tiny snaps, but super glued it back on. So, be gentle...

    LMDE is about 10s boot time for me.


    11) Android Intel - I tried a recent Android build for Intel, and it installed fine from USB. Unfortunately, the touch screen did not work. It also wiped my SDHC card, (My fault), which it uses for primary app storage.


    12) Here are some wacom tweaks I added to /etc/gdm3/Init/Default:

    xsetwacom set "Wacom ISDv4 90 Pen stylus" "Area" "300 0 26202 16325" &
    xsetwacom set "Wacom ISDv4 90 Pen eraser" "Area" "300 0 26202 16325" &

    This fixes a slight horizonal offset. There may be better numbers for this...

    -=-=-

    In short, it's a great portable sketchbook for Linux users. (Though I wish the EA800 were available. It would be nice to have a dedicated digital color sketchbook. I have a really cool design idea in mind.)

    Vendors these days are dissappointing though. Their drivers don't perform well and 'support' is a brick wall. I'd love to try and redo Wacom's location firmware to be more responsive. But everything is closed source...
     
  7. wicked1

    wicked1 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I put opensuse on mine.. it worked ootb. Pen calibration was off and I had to fix that. I didn't do extensive testing, though.
     
  8. Pirohmaniac

    Pirohmaniac Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Ubuntu 11.10 beta 2 does the same as the rest with the touchscreen.
    The bluetooth works and the wifi work better though. Wifi would slow down to a few kb/s on 11.04.
    In the Xorg logfile I noticed it had a lot more info on the touchscreen like axis measurements, it knew it was supposed to use absolute coordinates, no pressure will use something else (can't remember) instead.
    It still said it was a touchpad and loaded the synaptics module for it.
    I'll upload pics or maybe a youtube video tomorrow if I can get around to it.

    So the touchscreen worked properly as well? Downloading to try but i'd rather know beforehand.
     
  9. Pirohmaniac

    Pirohmaniac Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Didn't get around to it. Didn't work anyway. HOWEVER... :)
    eGalax updated their linux drivers!
     
  10. AbeOwitz

    AbeOwitz Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Update:

    Disabling touchpad
    You can disable the touchpad with a udev rule. Add this to the 99-local.rules (depending on your distro.)

    # USB Device Bus 002 Device 005: ID 0eef:a001 D-WAV Scientific Co., Ltd - eGalax TouchScreen (buggy)
    SUBSYSTEMS=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0eef", ATTRS{idProduct}=="a001", RUN="/bin/rm /dev/input/event%n", OPTIONS="ignore_device"

    This will remove the actual event device, preventing xorg from talking to it.

    The current drivers won't load in xorg server 1.11.1, and unfortunately, they are not open source, so I can't fix it. I've emailed the OEM with details.

    Extra keys

    The special keys are handled by the eeepc-wmi kernel module. Power and volume buttons work fine.

    Unfortunately the additional keys are relatively new and unmapped. If you really want to use them, you'll have to recompile the eeepc-wmi module.

    Edit /usr/src/linux/drivers/platform/x86/eeepc-wmi.c and add three (0xf3,0xf5,0xf6) new codes to the keymap structure:

    static const struct key_entry eeepc_wmi_keymap[] = {
    /* Sleep already handled via generic ACPI code */
    { KE_KEY, 0x30, { KEY_VOLUMEUP } },
    { KE_KEY, 0x31, { KEY_VOLUMEDOWN } },
    { KE_KEY, 0x32, { KEY_MUTE } },
    { KE_KEY, 0x5c, { KEY_F15 } }, /* Power Gear key */
    { KE_KEY, 0x5d, { KEY_WLAN } },
    { KE_KEY, 0x6b, { KEY_TOUCHPAD_TOGGLE } }, /* Toggle Touchpad */
    { KE_KEY, 0x82, { KEY_CAMERA } },
    { KE_KEY, 0x83, { KEY_CAMERA_ZOOMIN } },
    { KE_KEY, 0x88, { KEY_WLAN } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xbd, { KEY_CAMERA } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xcc, { KEY_SWITCHVIDEOMODE } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xe0, { KEY_PROG1 } }, /* Task Manager */
    { KE_KEY, 0xe1, { KEY_F14 } }, /* Change Resolution */
    { KE_KEY, 0xe8, { KEY_SCREENLOCK } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xe9, { KEY_BRIGHTNESS_ZERO } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xeb, { KEY_CAMERA_ZOOMOUT } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xec, { KEY_CAMERA_UP } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xed, { KEY_CAMERA_DOWN } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xee, { KEY_CAMERA_LEFT } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xef, { KEY_CAMERA_RIGHT } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xf3, { KEY_COMPOSE } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xf5, { KEY_F11 } },
    { KE_KEY, 0xf6, { KEY_TAB } },

    { KE_END, 0},
    };

    This turns the front round button into a 'tab' key, perfect for hiding/showing the brushes/tools in MyPaint.

    The screen lock button now becomes F11 or full screen. This works with all apps.

    The virtual keyboard button becomes the 'menu' button, which pulls up application specific menus.

    Naturally, if you can compile the kernel, you can edit the above for the key combinations you desire. (Key definitions are in /usr/src/linux/include/linux/input.h)

    Or, you can use the udev keymap utility to change these on demand. (But these need to be defined in the kernel first.)
     
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