Toshiba Portégé Z20t Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Toshiba' started by ile, Nov 15, 2014.

  1. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    The new US pre-order ship dates keep slipping. It now shows 3/18.

    If they keep slipping like this the new pre-orders are probably going to be April before the first units are in users hands so that I can read your reviews. I think Toshiba is doing this on purpose. An April ship date would make my T904 cross the critical 1 year old psychological threshold, increasing the likelihood of rationalizing an upgrade.
     
  2. fatherom

    fatherom Pen Pal - Newbie

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    My ship date is holding firm at 2/27, so I think the date is slipping for newer pre-orders.
     
  3. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    Yea, that is what I thought, and it was part of my point. By the time you guys get it so I can hear your thoughts, the earliest I'll be able to get my hands on one is April. If I get one at all, it will definitely not be before I hear some user thoughts.
     
  4. fatherom

    fatherom Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Gotcha.
     
  5. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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  6. HuckleBoo

    HuckleBoo Pen Pal - Newbie

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    The major problem of the Core M is, that it isn't ultra efficient and that the hype about lighter tablet PCs will give you shorter runtime caused by smaller batteries. Nothing else.

    There are a lot of vendors like Lenovo, Dell and HP, which will offer you a lot of Core M based models. Some are very expensive (Lenovo), some are still not available (Asus Chi series), some are only for home users (HP) and some are...we will see how long they work (Dell).

    None of this devices will provide you 16-20hrs or longer. Similar physical dimensions and weight, but higher prices and less performace. A Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro? What a joke for 10 Benjamin or more.
     
  7. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    Lets not get out of hand here. The screen alone is going to draw enough power to prevent 16-20 hour run times without huge batteries. No one is saying that.

    Core M is very efficient compared to what we have seen before. The z20t has a much lower TDP than the SP3 while sacrificing very little performance. It gets longer battery life (at least comparing the claims), while having a significantly smaller battery and a lighter slate.

    I think it is certainly an open question how much of an efficiency improvement Core M is over Broadwell U in light use, but it is certainly a significant step over Haswell Y or U.
     
  8. ElectronicFur

    ElectronicFur Pen Pal - Newbie

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    It's only 70g lighter than the SP3 though. So for me the big question is how much performance is sacrificed compared to an i7 SP3. I'm still not clear on that. If it is a lot then the 70g, lack of fan and longer battery life aren't worth it for me.
     
  9. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    The keyboard does not look to be typist friendly. The Yoga 14 has much nicer scalloped keys.

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    Well even the i7 SP3 is heavily hamstrung by thermal limits. For sustained loads the i7 SP3 is no better than the i3 because both will cause it to throttle, and both have equal thermal efficiency. However, both are a little faster for short to medium turbo boost I think compared to Core M. Based on the Geek bench scores (CPU) and Cinebench (GPU performance) Core M is about 20% slower. (Both of these from memory, so check if you really need to know)

    Really though it isn't so simple as that. The numbers are heavily dependent on their duration for example, and it is different in every specific use case. For light use (onenote, word, web browsing, etc.), the difference is essentially 0%. It is only for heavy tasks like video processing, number crunching, gaming, etc. that the differences show themselves.

    For me though even, a 20% reduction is like giving up nothing. In my use case, I don't come close to taxing my Haswell 4300U, so giving up ~20% top end speed is just giving up something I never used anyway. Editing a word document, taking notes, web browsing, NoMachine, etc rarely force my system out of its lowest P-state (~0.8 GHz) let alone tax its thermal envelope. So for me, and many other users (a significant majority of business users I'd guess), I'm essentially giving up nothing for a lighter, thinner, colder, quieter, and longer lasting device. That is what Core M is designed for.

    Once the threshold of fast enough to run light tasks smoothly is passed (Core M + an SSD does that). The performance metric that matters to me is performance/watt. Peak performance doesn't effect me at all (on my laptop/tablet).
     
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