Toshiba Portégé Z20t Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Toshiba' started by ile, Nov 15, 2014.

  1. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    It is almost certainly worse performing than even i3 Broadwell. Depending on what you do though you may not notice it (I won't). Core M trades top end performance for less heat and longer lasting battery life. Unless the thermals are poorly handled by the OEM, iseries Broadwell will always be faster than core m Broadwell under heavy load. The question is, will you strain the system enough to see these limits?
     
  2. vraylalne

    vraylalne Pen Pal - Newbie

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    How do you think it will compare to Haswell i5s? Some of the devices I'm considering are Haswell or even Ivy Bridge. I've also wondered if core-m devices will be more likely to have throttling issues. Is that possible?
     
  3. ivan99

    ivan99 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    The Broadwell 5Y71 M chip in the z20t hi priced version will most likely perform somewhere in between a Haswell i5 or i7, but will most certainly be slower than the Broadwell U i series. These latter processors are not suited for thin 2 in 1 laptop applications, they are being used in full laptops only. That is my understanding of the published information!
     
  4. Tea and crumpets

    Tea and crumpets Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I got curious so I did some poking around online. From what comparisons I have seen it appears that the 5y71m processor is on par with/in some regards better than the 3rd generation i7 in the first Cintiq Companion. Does that sound about right? Because I know that device is capable of doing what I want in terms of power.
     
  5. ivan99

    ivan99 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Are you sure it is not as good as the 4th gen Haswell and not as you state the 3rd Ivy bridge?
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2015
  6. FZelle

    FZelle Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    There are now so many benchmarks out there that prove that.
     
  7. Tea and crumpets

    Tea and crumpets Scribbler - Standard Member

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    It probably is as good, I chose to speculate on the Cintiq Companion as it's a solid performer and the only comparable device I could think of at the time.
     
  8. HuckleBoo

    HuckleBoo Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Unfortunately, it will not be comparable to the Haswell i7. The performance of the Core M depends on the overall thermal design of the device. The major problem is, that the utilization of the GPU will have much higher impact on the overall performance as it has today with Core i5 systems, which are not fanless. Except some Core i5 series -Y tablets like the HP Spectre x2.

    The major issue of the Core M is, that the performance peak will not last long. Many internet sites and bloggers have compared several Core M devices and a lot of them said, that if you need a dual-core (quad isn't available yet) performance over a long timeperiod, a Core M 5Y10 can sometimes satisfy you more as a bad device with a 5Y7x.

    The 5Y7x will archive in benchmarks sometimes the performance of the Core i5 Y and U series and maybe sometimes fast as the Core i3. But there are soooo many dependencies...u will never know. It's a typical move of Intel. Just marketing, make more money, release some kind of "innovations".

    I decided in the 2nd week of January, that I will not wait any longer for the 5th generation of Core i5 (Quad) CPUs. So I compared some tablets based on my requirements (Win8, FHD + >= 11" display, full 2-in-1 convertible, minimum 256GB SSD, 8GB RAM, LTE, Fingerprint sensor, Wacom digitizer, full ultrabook-like keyboard dock, optional light travel keyboard like Surface folio):

    * Toshiba z20t
    * Lenovo Yoga Pro 3 (I felt a little betrayed, when they shipped it with a fan to their customers and said before on expos, that it's fanless)
    * HP Pro x2 612
    * Wacom Cinteq 2 (very expensive, but available with full Core i7. But no specs about battery runtime)

    Core M became a no-go! to me. And at the end, I'm now a happy owner of the HP Pro x2 612. It fulfills all requirements with his Wacom 12,5" display and is the only one, that's available. Solid Core i5 performance and battery runtime.
     
  9. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    Yea, if you are even considering that you might need quad core, clearly core M isn't meant for you, but I think a significant majority of business laptop users have no need for that kind of power. Core M is ultra efficient so that it doesn't get hot or eat battery, it is not designed for sustained heavy loads like video processing or things of that nature.

    Many of the benchmarks are short duration, so, if what you really need for your use case is sustained loads (and I'd wager many people who think they do really don't), you need to be careful which benchmarks you look at. Some of them don't run long enough for the throttling to kick in.

    The work I do involves a lot of heavy number crunching (analyzing/modeling satellite imager data). It is basically hopeless to try to do that on any mobile device (without a significant performance hit), so I don't even try. I just remote into my hexacore Xeon server with its 3.5 TFLOP Tesla GPU, 64GB of ram and 36 TB raid array =)

    I just use my laptop/tablet for OneNote, web browsing, Office, etc. None of these things are going to strain the system enough to even notice the performance delta between Core M and my server. Honestly even Core M is probably overkill for these tasks. It can do a lot more than that. For the tasks that do need more power when I'm away from my desk, I can RDP into my desktop machine, or use NoMachine to work on my server.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2015
  10. Tea and crumpets

    Tea and crumpets Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Hmm. In that case I think it would be a good idea to visit the "What tablet PC should I buy?" section sooner than planned.
     

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