Toshiba Encore 2 Write does NOT use Wacom Feel It (Penabled/EMR) digitizer

Discussion in 'The Tablet PC Life' started by Shogmaster, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. Shogmaster

    Shogmaster Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Nothings beats going to the source and asking the right questions to right people to get the real info. In my first day of CES 2015, I have some interesting details about items already reported by others but left wanting in details. For instance:

    Toshiba Encore 2 Write's pen digitizer is NOT Feel It digitizer. It is their new "Active ES" digitizer. ES stands for "Electro Static", which is Wacom Japan speak for projected capacitive. This new digitizer works like N-Trig and Atmel's, using capacitive screen's digitizer for X/Y coordinate. This also means it uses AAAA battery lie the others. Wacom developed this new digitizer as a low end option that give the ODMs flexibility to sell units without the pen initially, then sell the pen later as an accessory. The feel of it was much like N-Trig's and like N-Trig's there is that blob that happens when you first open a program and touch down with the pen for the first time. It much be pro cap based active pen quirk.
     
  2. JoeS

    JoeS I'm all ears Senior Member

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    This sounds the same as the Wacom solution in the Yoga 14 and Yoga 15, which Lenovo calls 'ActivePen', see here.
     
  3. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    I'm definately jelous you get to go to CES, but in this case we've known this fact for months. Nonetheless, many people around here don't seem to get that it isnt the "Wacom" they are used to. So another reminder won't hurt.

    Did you get to play with it much? If so, how did it compare to EMR wacom and N-Trig?

    Why don't they ever hold a CES like event in rural Virginia?
     
  4. saqrkh

    saqrkh Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Question, does Active ES offer palm-rejection? And overall, is this solution similar to the one used on the Surface Pro 3? So would general performance with this the Active ES be on par or inferior?

    Apologies if my questions sound rudimentary, I'm having trouble finding proper information on the Toshiba Encore 2 Write.
     
  5. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    It has a lot in common with N-trig I think, but I think any more than that is pure speculation. It is brand new tech. My guess is N-trig is probably better. They've been developing this particular tech for a lot longer than Wacom, but it is way to early to tell. Maybe they engaged in some Corporate espionage to get a leg up on N-trig =)
     
  6. WillAdams

    WillAdams Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Wacom has had decades working on this sort of thing, and a number of patents which others have to work around, and the opportunity to tear apart and examine competitors' devices. It would be surprising if they didn't manage something frankly better.
     
  7. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    I don't think their expertise with EMR tech carries over much to projected capacitive. They operate on fundamentally different principals.

    IMO their EMR patents are the main reason for their success more so than the quality of the company. They had a good idea in the 80s and defended the patents on it tooth and nail. I'd love to be wrong, but my gut tells me N-trig will be better than Wacom's AES tech... at least right out of the gate.
     
  8. saqrkh

    saqrkh Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I write notes and draw diagrams and graphs, so long as the Wacom AES includes palm-rejection and a reasonable level of accuracy and latency, I'll be content. From what I've seen of the videos, accuracy and latency shouldn't be a problem (for me), but I've yet to see definitive evidence of it having palm-rejection. And the fact that neither Toshiba or Wacom have come out and stated this in plain language concerns me.
     
  9. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    Palm rejection is really more of a function of the OS than the pen technology. It has hover, so Windows will enforce "palm rejection." I put that in quotes because all it really does is reject touch input once the pen is detected.
     
  10. JoeS

    JoeS I'm all ears Senior Member

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    On that topic though, the hover distance should play a pretty big role in how well this works. I find that with the SP2 I don't have to approach the screen tip-first as much as I used to on my X220t to avoid stray marks and unintended page moves. The hover range is really quite large on the SP2. From the E2Write video the hover distance appears quite small. I hope it's better on the Yoga 14 and Yoga 15.
     

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