Toshiba encore 2 vs asus vivotab note 8

Discussion in 'Toshiba' started by giantqtipz, Jan 31, 2015.

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  1. giantqtipz

    giantqtipz Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi guys,

    Just noticed the toshiba encore 2 has active digitizer. Is it better than vivotab note 8?

    How is it overall?
     
  2. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    A side by side comparison hasn't been done yet. The main difference between the two devices is the pen technology and one internal cable for which Dr. Mesosphere provides a DIY solution.

    Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk 4
     
  3. HuckleBoo

    HuckleBoo Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I owned the Asus VT Note 8 from Jan to Apr 2014 and I'm now owner of the HP Pro x2 612, which has the latest Wacom technology equal to the Encore 2.

    I don't feel any issues or a better performance. It's just an active Wacom digitizer - it works out of the box! Ok, some people had issues with their Asus displays, but that wasn't the failure of the technology. It was Asus faults with their poor production process for cheap designs.
     
  4. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    The Pro X2 uses the standard high end Wacom EMR tech (as does the Asus). The Toshiba Encore uses the brand new Wacom AES tech.

    There are tradeoffs to be had with either tech. The AES tech was created as a cheap alternative so that Wacom could compete with N-trig and Synaptics on the low end. It isn't meant to replace the Wacom EMR tech. Initial reports are very encouraging for it (see the thread). It has better edge tracking than EMR and better absolute calibration, but EMR still has several advantages over it, and the AES tech is so brand new that we don't know what its long term reliability will be like and such.
     
  5. b52hbuff

    b52hbuff Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I seem to recall that one of the advantages of N-Trig for the Surface Pro 3 was that it allowed for a thinner tablet.

    I wonder if AES will share a similar property and allow for thinner tablets?
     
  6. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    I've heard this claimed too... but the Wacom EMR toting Galaxy Note 4, and z20t (both thinner than the Ntrig SP3) lead me to believe that, while there is probably some truth to it, it can be overcome, at least with the 8-10mm thickness devices we are seeing these days.
     
  7. cutterline

    cutterline Scribbler - Standard Member

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    It actually depends on what you and how far you want to compromise
    I used synaptics which was rubbish (I don't know whose fault either dell or synaptics) then I moved on to asus note 8 which is much better but not really perfect in my opinion.
    Even after calibration, the edge tracking is unbearable in metro apps especially onenote but much better in desktop but then again onenote desktop is not optimized for touch/pen interface (as usual microsoft mistake, they drunk too much caffeine I suppose or they have win8desktop, win8metro, and intermediary department with a group consisting only 10 people to bridge both side).

    To clarify the thinner problem, it is cheaper and thinner than emr. why? EMR has separate layer than touch = 2 sensor in separate place whatsoever as found in asus note8 and not to mention less profit because the touch is made by other supplier. This also give parallax problem and contribute to some of the edge problem.
    Synaptics, ntrig, and AES should be using same concept (CMIIW), they need a new active variable to change whatever field in the pen layer but this has the advantage of being thin and can be made into 'one' layer (still two but very thin or maybe it's only one now as my knowledge is like 2-3 years old) with just one module sensor to control everything = better profit as they sell both touch and pen in one package. Although the downside is you have to change the battery.
    AAAA battery is not really a problem as I actually took apart a home telephone battery to make rechargeable AAAA battery. You can find it in one of my post

    I do suggest you if possible to test both devices before buying and decide which one you like.
     
  8. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    From what I see of the Toshiba tablet, other than the pen, it has it all over the AVN8. I haven't tried the pen, so I can't really speak to that yet, but early reviews, at least for the pen on this device, are mostly positive. The small issues are not that important to me, a note taker, not an artist.

    Build quality looks superior to the AVN8 (probably not hard to do, since they can't even seem to get the digitizer and display cables properly seated in the receivers). The pen has a place to reside, albeit, not in the body of the tablet. Toshiba has indicated that a keyboard cover will be available for the tablet (can't really tell if this is only for the 10" tablet or not). http://www.toshiba.com/us/tablets/encore2-write/8/WT8PE-B264 Toshiba is releasing a snap case and cover. And, probably the biggest advantage over the M80TA, the Encore 2 gets a connect and charge USB cable. That would permit this unit to be docket at work like the Dell Venue 8.

    If I was looking for an 8" tablet now and didn't already own the AVN8, I would be seriously thinking about this tablet. I would probably get it over the AVN8 if the pen performance didn't suck.
     
  9. dceggert

    dceggert Owner of a TabletPC Museum Senior Member

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    @Bronsky - I agree; the new Wacom system sounds like it fixed a few things like edge accuracy and the 'parallax' depth affect that plague the old system. The only thing that potentially concerns me is long-term internal contact corrosion inside the pen like the early N-trig, Atmel, and Synaptics systems. I hope Wacom did not make the same mistakes with their initial offering.

    To all - since N-trig v3.5, the corrosion issues have been fixed with N-trig systems so devices like those from Sony or the new Surface Pro 3 are okay. Not so lucky on the Synaptics or Atmel competitor systems.

    The electrical current needed to power the pen is insufficient to keep the contacts clean, or, the materials chosen are dissimilar on the Synaptics and Atmel pens. Those of you with this new Wacom tech please keep an eye out for pen performance degrading over time even with sufficient battery voltage. This is a long term issue that is not present on a new device.

    When your batteries need replacing please keep track of the battery voltage. Corrosion issues will show up in a steadily increasing depleted voltage; .85v, then .88v, then .93v, etc.
     
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  10. cutterline

    cutterline Scribbler - Standard Member

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    @dceggert - I think unless wacom is completely retarded, they would've had noted the corrosion issue from n-trig. Well my basis is that I'm happy using their intuos and had their asus note8 and also they should pull the Japanese stereotype superb quality.
    For n-trig case, they were the pioneer of tablet technology with active pen which was dominated by wacom on that time so it was more like trial and error but with customers as lab rats (hey, funded research xD).

    Atmel and synaptics were bat **** crazy doing their funded research with really bad result. I'm not talking about like 1st year/1st release problem which is common thing and ntrig also had but n-trig was already there so the benchmark was already higher and they performed below that. They were too late and couldn't deliver a good first impression. Now, it's getting harder to survive after wacom jumped into the wagon as well and positively received.
     
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