Tilt and older Wacom EMR tablet PC pens

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by surfaceproartist, Jul 21, 2017.

  1. surfaceproartist

    surfaceproartist Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Just testing the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro with a couple of older pens (Bamboo Carbon and Axiotron Studio Pen). Trying out the pens in the Windows Ink Workspace Sketchpad, I'm surprised to find that tilt is recognized. I thought older tablet PC pens didn't have tilt sensors? Is this just a Windows 10 software trick? Anyone knowledgeable about the subject care to advise?
     
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  2. WillAdams

    WillAdams Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Tilt is a feature activated by the digitizer / driver AIUI --- the driver parses the shape of the received radio signal on the digitizer and determines the angle / tilt based on that.
     
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  3. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    I linked to the Wacom patent a while back, but don't feel like digging it up. The very first patented Wacom EMR digitizers sampled the three most powerful signals on the digitizer (three X and three Y coordinates) and interpolated the position from them. Then the patented advanced digitizers sampled the six strongest signals per axis, which increased accuracy and also allowed them to interpolate tilt.

    Basically every Wacom digitizer that's not ancient can detect tilt, and this feature is disabled in firmware/software.

    The oldest patent expired a while ago, giving us old Wacom-like digitizers like Artisul. The new(er) patent expired in 2015 I think, but AES is cheaper and easier to implement these days, even though technically the technology is less elegant.
     
  4. Shizaru

    Shizaru Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I seem to remember reading something thatcomicsguy wrote on this subject, where he explained how he tricked a tablet with tilt into using a different pen from a non-tilt enabled device. He was bringing both pens to one point and then removing the tilt-enabled pen away and then continuing drawing with the non-tilt-enabled pen. The tablet would carry on accepting the tilt input all the time he kept the pen in range iirc.

    So, as the others have said it appears that the pens have the capability, but in usual Wacom fashion they cripple features to broaden their product range, so they can fleas their users for every last penny possible.

    I would have brought a Wacom MobileStudio Pro 13 but after the appalling customer experience I have had with my £1700 Wacom paper weight (Cintiq Companion 1), I can't bring myself to be a willing victim again.

    At the rate pen enabled devices are evolving it won't be long before Wacom lose a serious percentage of their market share. It's probably safe to say they have already been seeing a reductions in sales at an increasing rate becoming more substantial with each new generation of tablet pc's and other penable devices.

    They haven't really done anything to build real customer loyalty, while charging premium for their products, with substandard support and customer care polices one would not expect from a premium supplier. Wacom will probably be forced to adjust their business model in the not so distant future by becoming more competitive. They could have been more liberal with their licensing in the past offering third-parties access to more feature rich solutions. Instead they created a situation where companies developed alternative pen solutions, which further diluted their market position and influence in the market they have dominated for years.

    Imho the next couple of tablet generations are going to give users amazing pen experiences, exceeding anything Wacom offer. In fact the current generation devices aren't far off meeting the needs of your average user and professional artists alike. If they only listened to customer feedback we would already have an affordable killer artist tablet.

    The Samsung Notebbook 9 13"/15" being a prime example of the type of competition Wacom are facing. All it will take is for Samsung to add some express keys and full feature pen software support for them to capture a large percentage of the pro artist market, while also being affordable enough for enthusiasts etc.

    I'm just waiting for your review on the N9P before I make a final decision on purchasing one. All I need right now is a nudge from someone giving a full hands on review from an artists perspective. I already know I'm going to have to accept some compromises, which I'm pretty sure I can live with or workaround. The N9P 15 has a great price to spec. ratio, with arguably the best pen technology available (imho). At $1300 - £1000 ish it's a no brainer and I think I would have already pulled the trigger if they were available here in the UK. The downside of buying an import is forcing me to pause for thought.

    Wacom are history as far as I'm concerned form now on.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2017
  5. WillAdams

    WillAdams Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Uh, you do realize that the reason Samsung has the S-pen technology is that they are a majority shareholder in Wacom?
     
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  6. Shizaru

    Shizaru Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Yes, I'm fully aware of that fact. In the not too distant future they will probably be the owners of Wacom if Wacom don't adjust their business model.
     
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