Thinkpad P50 with ThinkPad Pen Pro (Wacom AES)!?

Discussion in 'Lenovo (IBM)' started by testplayer, Feb 28, 2016.

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  1. surfaceproartist

    surfaceproartist Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Was it you who came up with the interesting conspiracy theory about faulty digitizers in 15-inch plus displays, @thatcomicsguy? That's the only plausible explanation I could see for not making these laptops Yogas. I guess you can mark up on a vertical screen but I can't imagine doing serious work with a pen in that orientation. Maybe Lenovo figures no one willing to work that way is going to complain about increased jitter?


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  2. rebelismo

    rebelismo Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I did consider buying a relatively inexpensive Monoprice screen tablet to use with a laptop, but that's still two devices. You're absolutely right about working on a small screen for 8-10 hours at a time. I used to ink on the 12wx, which basically gave me nightmares about 12 inch screens. Based on what you said, it looks like AES could be a good fit for me. Honestly, the new Lenovo laptops seem like a great combination for my criteria: stylus, Nvidia card for CUDA processing, and a large screen. The P50 and 70 should be able to handle any 2D, 3D and video editing program and keep me mobile.
     
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  3. jakeyjohn1

    jakeyjohn1 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I'm super excited to learn about this pen support, pretty much because I fit into this category, kinda.

    I've used a X201t as my primary computer since 2011, and the only time I put it into tablet mode to write on it is during presentations, and that is to be courteous to the presenter. During all other uses, lounging or at a desk, if I need to write something I just pick up the pen and write on the screen with it up in front of me. The x201t has that single hinge and the screen wobbles all over the place, I have to brace the screen with one hand and write on it with the other like a clipboard, but its still more convenient than transforming it. If I'm writing for an extended period (drawing diagrams, brainstorming lists, algebra etc) I'll push the screen back all the way, flat against the desk or my lap and write on it, the keyboard doesn't get in the way (and the x201t can't technically lay its screen all the way flat, but its good enough). Maybe not comfortable enough for art applications, but math/engineering work is easily doable like this. Even though Lenovo couldn't deliver an EMR pen in a package this size that would be usable for artists, I'm super excited Lenovo realized the potential handwriting input has for an engineering oriented user. Handwriting recognition is a game changer for CAS programs...

    Having said that my handwriting can get really small, sometimes I have trouble in onenote with the wacom EMR pen on my x201t. So if these systems have anymore jitter or other problems than the smaller ones I don't know if it would be usable for me.

    The general consensus as best as I can make it out around here seems to be that the new AES is good enough for note taking (which I'm hoping is good enough for math/algebra).
    But are you guys saying these larger ones (the Lenovo P50 w/AES pen and the p70w/AES pen) might be of lesser quality? Is there something inherent to how these pens work that is suggesting larger ones won't work as well?

    The fact that they seemingly are hiding this awesome feature is weird...
     
  4. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I was being snarky. There's no rational reason to think that the technology won't work as advertised. -If it isn't up to snuff, then you can always return the machine, I'd think.

    It would certainly be interesting to get your perspective if you did pick one up to try out.
     
  5. surfaceproartist

    surfaceproartist Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    To me it's idle speculation based on the curious decision Lenovo made to remove pen support from its last generation of 15-inch Thinkpad Yogas and now to release the P50 as a non-Yoga.


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  6. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Hm.

    It can lie flat...

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. heezy

    heezy Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I've been looking into this for a little while and actually took a chance in ordering the P70 with a pen to replace my X220T. Like @rebelismo, I hardly ever took advantage of tablet mode with my X220T because I always do graphics or draw in regular laptop form, so this may be the perfect fit for me.

    It's gonna take about a week to ship but I'll update on how it works with the pen when it comes in and I have some time to mess with it.
     
  8. NamelessPlayer

    NamelessPlayer Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    You'd be surprised. I mostly ended up drawing in laptop mode on my T901 and T902 because I needed access to the keyboard while drawing.

    The bezel buttons don't allow for enough shortcuts, either. I'd need an ExpressKey-style arrangement like on the Cintiq Companion line in order to effectively go keyboardless due to the keyboard shortcuts required in some apps. I didn't like using touch panels on the T902 either, since I was already constrained for screen space.

    With that said, it's considerably more inconvenient for note-taking and portable use when you can't actually use it in tablet mode, but if you're just drawing at a desk as if you had a Cintiq or similar monitor before you, it's quite workable.

    Oh, and as for the P50 and P70, this probably marks the first time we can get a Wacom digitizer (albeit AES) in a mobile computer with a GPU that doesn't suck. (Even the few tablet PCs with dedicated GPUs have fairly low-end ones, nothing on the level of the GTX 980M/980 for notebooks.) You'll be paying a pretty penny for it, though, but that's par for the course when there's decent dedicated GPUs involved and it's a ThinkPad.
     
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  9. rebelismo

    rebelismo Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Nice to know that I'm not the only one who draws that way :D. I decided to order the P70 as well. The combination of CUDA graphics, a 17 inch screen, and a wacom pen made the decision quite easy. I'll post an update here as well, once I've had some time to play with major graphics software.
     
  10. surfaceproartist

    surfaceproartist Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Look forward to definitive word on the pen support, @rebelismo!

    @heezy Did you ever get your P70?

    I tried looking up the three P70 models that PSREF states support Thinkpad Pen Pro and none of them show up in the store.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2016
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