The ultimate new x61 question

Discussion in 'Lenovo (IBM)' started by freedomeagle, Mar 22, 2009.

?

Clean vs. manual removal

  1. Clean

    29 vote(s)
    70.7%
  2. Manual removal

    12 vote(s)
    29.3%
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. tjcinnamon

    tjcinnamon Scribbler - Standard Member

    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    I looked at the threads about a clean install vs. manual removal. A clean install seems like it takes a lot more time. There seem to be performance gain with a clean install.

    Is it worth it?
     
  2. Anonymouse

    Anonymouse A nondescript mouse

    Messages:
    317
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    I just did the "Rescue and Recovery" and chose not to install things like Norton I didn't want and knew I would never use. I can't say if it is better or worse than a clean install since I didn't do that and therefore have no basis for comparison, but this method was easy, and I didn't have to worry about finding drivers/thinkpad functions and installing them myself.

    I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "manual removal" and "clean install". Here is how I would classify the choices:
    -clean install using a Windows install disk (have to then manually install all the system specific drivers and utilities you want to keep. I think the ThinkVantage stuff is pretty handy, especially the tablet shortcut menu, access connections, client security, etc)
    -Use Rescue & Recovery to do a "clean install" from the factory partition. This allows you to choose which "bloatware" you wish to keep, and which you don't want to install
    -Manually uninstalling components you don't like (this is sometimes troublesome as some programs don't all fully uninstall)

    I'd say the best "bang for the buck" is to do the Rescue & Recovery method.
     
  3. optobear

    optobear Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    If you call Lenovo to get a Windows Anytime Upgrade disk for the purpose of doing a completely clean install, would it be free?

    I actually like some of the ThinkVantage progs too, I use them on my x40 currently. I long ago deleted the factory partition to free up space (and it was on XP not even SP2 anyways), so I've been using an Windows XP SP2 CD to do clean installs a couple times a year.

    I think I'll go with the Rescue & Recovery method when I get my x61t, sounds like it's a lot more convenient! It should be pretty much the same as doing a full clean install from CD right?
     
  4. pibach

    pibach Scribbler - Standard Member

    Messages:
    528
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    TBOMK, both does lead to exactly the same result. The difference is psychological.
     
  5. optobear

    optobear Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    In Vista, do progs still have the problem of not cleanly uninstalling as on XP? Thus leading to a lot of bloat that would require a reformat at least once a year if a lot of programs had been installed/uninstalled?
     
  6. markUp

    markUp scribbling fool

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    My vote is for running Base Software Administrator (BSA) to create a detailed manifest, then factory recovery with that manifest, then manually disable the usual Windows performance hogs (indexing service, system restore service, themes, virtual memory, etc).

    optobear - Once upon a time, registry bloat caused performance problems in Windows 3.1, 95, 98. AFAIK this problem was fixed in Windows NT. Orphaned registry entries from a dirty uninstall should not affect performance in XP or Vista. So it really comes down to which approach takes the least time and effort.
     
  7. drd

    drd Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    If you know what to uninstall and how to do it, the manual option works just as well as a clean install. What takes longer depends how familiar you are with Lenovo bloatware and Windows.
     
  8. tjcinnamon

    tjcinnamon Scribbler - Standard Member

    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    I did the manual install because there seemed to be alot of drivers. I was able to get rid of everything I didn't want with a little research and a mod of msconfig.
     
  9. Thresher

    Thresher Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    optobear and others - you mention you like the Thinkvantage software, I have a few questions regarding it. I am new to Lenovo and tablets but have had my x61t for about two months and have been using it stock.

    For the life of me I do not know why Lenovo thinks they can better create a wifi manager over the 2 billion dollar development of Vista. I am particularly unimpressed with the Wifi manager portion. What is that thing called that overlays the easy to use and quick Vista connections interface?

    I found a thred but can not find it again where people were saying that after using the Thinkvantage restore with limited programs they reduced boot times from 4 minutes to 2 minutes. Can anyone help me find those threads again?

    Newb questions...thanks for any replies...
     
  10. optobear

    optobear Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    When I got my new Thinkpad x61t I realized there wasn't that many extra programs, maybe just a couple, so I decided not to even do the Rescue & Recovery reformat...I just ended up uninstalling those extra programs and applying some other performance tweaks I read about on other websites. It's running pretty well now, aside from a few minor glitches with my dispay drivers (which I think fixed themselves through Windows Update).

    I don't think I ever read that thread you mentioned, so sorry I can't be of any help finding it.

    I've never owned anything other than a Thinkpad so I actually do enjoy and use some of these Thinkvantage programs. I use Access Connections, Active Protection System, Client Security Solution (the fingerprint reader is great, but the password software and Mozilla extension is kinda slow/buggy and has caused my Firefox to crash several times...I can't even use Java on it now and have to use IE whenever a website uses Java, like the Facebook Photo Uploader), EasyEject Utility, Keyboard Customizer Utility (because I use the "°" symbol a lot), Power Manager, System Update (automates getting new Thinkpad drivers, etc...you COULD do it yourself but I'm just too lazy and/or busy for that), and Tablet Shortcut Menu.

    Vista definitely does have a much better wifi manager than XP did, but I'm soooo used to using Access Connections and having even more control over the connection profiles (since I tend to alternate between Home, Home at School, and On-Campus profiles, which all require different settings and different printers) that I just decided to keep using it. If you don't like Access Connections, don't use it...you're not obligated to use any ThinkVantage software...they're just there to give you more options in case you think it might be helpful. I mean, I never use Rescue and Recovery, since I back up certain files myself onto my external hard drive. I even uninstalled it on my old Thinkpad and deleted the factory partition, but now that I have so much hard drive space, I've just been keeping them both on my new Thinkpad. If I ever run out of space (and I still have 80 GB free), then I'll probably consider deleting them.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page