The artist's world

Discussion in 'The Tablet PC Life' started by Kumabjorn, Oct 12, 2015.

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  1. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    My impression, and I wasn't around in the early days, is that the old Macintosh kind of ruled in the graphics world back in the day. WYSIWYG was the word which they rallied around and Windows really didn't have anything comparable to offer. The the whole Scully/Amelio debacle kind of derailed Apple and Windows was able to move ahead.

    If that short resume is wrong, kindly correct.
    Then Jobs returned and Apple became exciting again, a lot of graphic artists returned to the apple orchard, but some where now weaned on Windows from the beginning and never left. Then came the whole tablet paradigm with iPad (and yes, I know there where PC tablets) and the potential for integrating that in the graphic artist's toolbox seemed to open up yet another paradigm.

    Is this where we are today? Or has Windows been able to provide as exciting platform and toolbox for the artist as Apple? It's there a shift going on, or are artists divided in two camps, Apple vs Microsoft? Are they trying to win hearts or cognitive rationalism?

    Not being an artist myself, I don't have first person access to that world.

    Balbutio ergo sum
     
  2. WillAdams

    WillAdams Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    That's a good layman's overview. The big thing for the Macintosh was the Apple LaserWriter (which originally had more memory and a faster processor than then available Macs) --- it also used PostScript --- see the NeXT Cube for that all grown up and made a central part of a system.

    Most graphic artists can move between the platforms, and most applications are available for either. Fonts are now OpenType, so cross-platform (for the most part, there are some system-specific fonts). The industry has pretty much collapsed into Adobe and some niche players (w/ Quark close to becoming a niche) --- only a few apps aren't available cross-platform these days, Corel is back to PC only, while Serif's Affinity Designer is that company's opening foray into Mac OS X.

    The interesting question will be how things play out for the iPad Pro and Surface line --- Microsoft is better positioned for people who prefer (or can only afford) a single multi-function device, while Apple is poised to sell one two special-purpose devices, one of which will require especial software support (which it seems to be getting).
     
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  3. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I distinctly remember a time when book layouts were done in QuarkXpress, which was an Apple-only program for a long while.

    Adobe came out with its own version, a program called PageMaker, which I dutifully went out and bought along with my first copy of Photoshop for PC. -With the plan of laying out comics on them. Photoshop was great, but the Adobe layout package was a huge headache!

    -I remember showing up at one graphics lab to get some cover layouts transferred to film, and everybody looked at me with pity when I said I'd done it all in PageMaker. The head of the studio sighed and said, "Ah. I think you mean RageMaker."

    He was right. That early version was hell to use, filled with those weird bugs which don't necessarily stop you from working, but which will magically and seemingly at random change things in your document while you work on it. I found myself at times practically shouting at the computer, "What?? Do you want me to burn incense to appease your psychotic Adobe holiness?? WHAT DO YOU WANT FROM ME??"

    When QuarkXpress was eventually ported to PC, my life got a whole lot easier. Finally InDesign came along and the brand of machine you use is now totally irrelevant. The industry doesn't care, so long as you provide the right files.

    So yeah, there was definitely a time when Apple was the only serious way to get things done. And like today, the PC universe within a couple of years caught up and now provides innovations and a wide variety of reliable solutions. (Witness the history of the iPad. Apple was king for a while, and now we have things like the Surface Pro line.)
     
  4. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    What I'm curious about is if that Apple bias still is alive and thriving, or does everyone involved acknowledge that it today is a platform independent business?

    Yes, I'm happy to see you and that is a Sony Xperia in my pocket
     
  5. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    oh definitely.......the apple Bias is still very much the way of the world.

    "Macs are best for Artists, Designers, Photographers, & Musicians!" line of BS still gets thrown around far more then it should.

    My eternal woe for NYC & NJ drawing events where usually I am either the only digital artist, or the only Non Ipad Digital Artist. Even at my local Starbucks or Coffee House when I try to get some work done....the majority of the questions I tend to field are definitely inspired by that apple mindset.

    "Wow.....you're drawing on that....and its windows?"

    "What app is that?"
    (Me) This Application is the full desktop build of Photoshop CC
    "Wow....I didn't know they had that had for the ipad"
    (Me) I"m not using an ipad, I'm drawing on a Surface Pro 3 running full Windows 8.1
    "Windows ...ehh....do they have that in a Mac?"

    I should really start keeping a better record of the questions I get asked....cause lord knows I've gotten so many over the years.

    Just the other day I paid a visit to the Wacom/Autodesk booth at NYC Comic Con.....they had their Cintiq 22 & 27's as well as a few Companion 2's on Demo. It was a fairly popular booth with countless non-tech noobs utterly mystified by drawing display tablets with pressure sensitive pens.
    "Oh my god....this is the coolest thing ever!!!!" (Cause lord knows they never ever saw a Galaxy Note in the wild)
    The larger Cintiqs were tethered to Macs, but the Companions were running Windows 10. I stood at the booth for about 20 minutes playing with the Cintiq 27 and the express key remote (contemplating getting the remote) .....and among the many questions and inquires the Wacom & Autodesk reps had....I saw the Wacom reps try to sell many people on the Cintiq Companion 2......and the pitch utterly feel apart at the running Windows Bit. In just that 20 minutes, at least 3 people dismissed the Companion 2 solely because it was running Windows.

    On a side note, I want to say for the record that the Autodesk reps were of no help. All the devices were running Sketchbook....and so many people were having trouble figuring out how to add layers, pick the pencil tool, or erase. Eavesdropping aside I spent much of that 20 minutes helping other people get started. "Click this, then click that"
    "Turn the pen around, it has an eraser on the end"

    But beyond Comic Con....find a mall that has an Apple Store and a Microsoft Store......like clockwork the Apple Store will always be packed and the Microsoft Store almost empty.

    And once that Ipad Pro and Apple Pencil come out......I fully expect the see the number of digital artists skyrocket......but only with the use of the Ipad Pro.
     
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  6. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    Fascinating, so that mindset is still deeply ingrained in a lot of people. People that are active graphic artists, or amateurs fooling around with art?

    Balbutio ergo sum
     
  7. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Yes on both fronts......at least for the NYC area anyway.
     
  8. stoneseeker

    stoneseeker Animator and Art Director Senior Member

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    If I may be so bold to generalize, I feel different types of artists have their preferences too:

    Graphic Artists - seem to mostly worship mac. I dont think I've ever walked into a graphic design suite with PC workstations.

    Animators - Seem tilted towards PC/windows, though some 2D studios do run macs for all occasionally.

    FX artists/matte/post - windows seems the common choice in this industry too.

    concept artists - I've never known an industry to be so split down the middle.

    hobbyists - Apple still seems more commonly sought after among aspiring artists and doodlers.


    I get annoyed by Apple fans and general apple-biased ignorance than I do Apple themselves. I feel personally that Apple hasn't really aimed at professionals or creatives for a long time until perhaps recently again with the pencil. They prioritized a much much bigger market: everyone else. Not that Windows or Microsoft ever aimed at artists or creatives much before the surface line. I always felt Microsoft was content being viewed as the business OS.
     
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  9. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    this reminds me of a Samung ad where a guy showed his phone to people standing in line outside an apple store:
    -wow it's cool, but I could never buy a Samsung... I'm creative.
    his friend: dude, you're a barista!


    there's plenty of amateurs fooling around and pofessionals who think too high of themselves out there. ;)
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2015
  10. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    That may be the most depressing thing I've heard all week, right after a story about the Syrian refugee crisis and a story about U.S. military contractors ripping off tax payers.

    -Which actually speaks to the same thing; the vast, mis-informed public.

    I want to be very clear on this, because what I have to say directly afterwards may be easily mis-interpreted:

    I have no trouble at all with folks using Macs for creative projects. Apple makes some excellent gear and you can get fine work done on them. If people like Macs, I fully encourage them to buy, support and enjoy working on them. That's great!

    What I do have trouble with are folks using Macs for creative projects and believing that they are using the best tools available simply because they don't know any better; without having expressly chosen.

    And here's the contentious part I warned was coming:

    I have to wonder if those people are really all that creative if they blindly believe in a sales pitch, in some ethereal and expensively marketed mythology about Apple being the best choice for creative people. Honestly. How can anybody be truly creative when they are functioning in a knowledge vacuum? When they believe what they are told without question? By a corporation?

    I wonder how much of value you can really offer the world when you aren't perceptive enough to think for yourself.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2015
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