Tablets in the Courtroom.

Discussion in 'Professions' started by Bronsky, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    Since getting a Slate 500, I've exclusively used a tablet in the Courtroom. Here is my current set up in a conference room at the court house getting ready for a hearing.
    WP_20140228_004.jpg

    My tablet has a complete back up of all my active case files, all of the legal research I've done on a particular issue, access to Lexis/Westlaw and legal periodicals. Looking forward to shrinking this down once I get my Asus Note 8.:thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2014
  2. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    How useful do you find it in these situations. Can you actually look up things while arguing a case at the same time?

    Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk 4
     
  3. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Kind of in line with Kumabjorn's question, are their any electronic restrictions for courtroom proceedings and trials?

    Awhile back I kind of entertained the notion of being a digital courtroom sketch artist, but I always figured that if they wouldn't allow photography in court, they probably wouldn't allow a tablet user.
     
  4. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    Most of the courtrooms I use have terminal access at counsel table and the bench. That cuts down the paper exhibits needed for direct or cross examination. Large exhibits are displayed on a smartboard for the experts to mark up electronically. All of my documents etc for hearings or trials are electronic. Even the cases I'm using in an argument are downloaded, annotated and indexed to get access if the court questions the accuracy of the proposition a case is cited for or questions about a case's facts.

    For motions, all my notes are in OneNote or are annotated PDF's with links to the cases that are cited with important passages highlighted for quick reference. This is mostly for pre hearing preparation as oral argument normally moves too fast to refer back to notes, unless a specific statute or regulation's exact language becomes crucial. Then, it's at my finger tips. I also tend to take additional notes during argument over my prepared notes that help with reconsideration motions or appeals.

    I've come to rely on the tablet quite a bit.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2014
  5. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    I can see that. You also carry an external power brick just in case it drags on? It sure beats color coded post-its I bet. What would happen if a virus starts running while in court? Would the judge grant a continuance?

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  6. AveSharia

    AveSharia Scribbler - Standard Member

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    OneNote has always been amazing for making volumes of detail accessible in seconds by virtue of its collapsible-thread mechanic.

    I still have all my notes from law school on one page per outline, but each outline topic can break down into cases, and each case into individual case brief with facts, quotes from the court, and my own notes. It was clutch for studying... don't understand a nuance in the outline? Expand it to the case.

    When I had to write papers, I actually pasted the text of law review articles into OneNote and summarized them, nesting the actual text for reference later. Of course, that was when Lexis/Westlaw was "free" (i.e. included in tuition).

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  7. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    One of the things I love about the Fuji us its swappable battery. But I keep a power brick with me at trial. We have plugs under our counsel tables. The one improvement I'm waiting for is a portable touchscreen that can replace the smartboard.

    Unfortunately, my law school days predate onenote (we were using DOS Windows and WordStar or Wordperfect - WP is a habit I've never broken). Even then I was one of the first students they had ever seen taking electronic notes. Here's the notebook I used.
    250px-Radio_Shack_TRS-80_Model_100.jpg

    No pen input.:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2014
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  8. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    Forgive my ignorance, but couldn't the court provide a50" touch screen that you could connect to through DNLA?

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  9. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    The Court doesn't provide anything like that. We're lucky if they have an easel to write on. Whatever we use has to be easily rent-able. I know that they exist but none of out media sources are embracing them.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2014
  10. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    That just seem shortsighted to me, both parties at a trial would benefit, and in a jury trial presentations would be much more pedagogical, but what do I know.

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