Tablet Drawing Software

Discussion in 'Software' started by sleepy, Sep 19, 2007.

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  1. nikecar

    nikecar Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    for the $30 of the essentials pack, that is in line with the cost of ArtRage (not free one)
     
  2. sleepy

    sleepy Aerospace Engineering

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    Wow thanks for such a full answer. (and thanks everyone else!) I will try all those programs out. I really want to learn to draw but i dont have a single artistic gene in me.

    As for Artrage vs TwistedBrush. I still havent had much time to play with it. But form ya'lls confidence in it I prob will get it. First glance Artrage looks like the right choice because of its price and well it looks user friendly. Twistedbrush on the other hand is almost 5 times more costly and well it looks like a big blob of buttons. The reason I think I will end up getting twisted brush is because well one, I hate buying something and nothing getting everything I can, and well Twistedbrush most indefinetly seems to have a lot more. As for user friendly, any program can become user friendly once you learn how to use it!.

    schroder999 could you tell me how you like twistedbrush? Maybe just a comparison to Artrage! Thanks alot!
     
  3. P8RSON

    P8RSON Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Without doubt ArtRage is a simple frills-free art program that anyone can pick up and use.
    I myself use it and Sketchbook Pro.

    Twistedbrush however is much more intense program but it gives you so, so much more tools to work with....

    As an example and this is by no means complete, there's not many art programs that give you the likes of:-
    • Acrylics ~ 21
    • Airbrushes ~ 14
    • Blenders ~ 18
    • Chalks ~ 12
    • Charcoals ~ 19
    • Conte Crayons ~ 15
    • Basic Crayons ~ 18
    • Erasers ~ 17
    • Felt Markers ~ 12
    • Masking Tools ~ 40+
    • Oil Paints ~ 50+ Inc Extra Wet Oils, Textured, Powdery, Fading, Frosted, etc.
    • Oil Pastels ~ 30
    • Palette Knives ~ 30+
    • Pastels ~ 40+ Not Oil Pastels
    • Pencils ~ 30+ Inc in 4H, 3H, 2H, H, HB, B, F, 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B, 6B, Oil, Waxy, etc.
    • Pens ~ 20+ Inc Gels, Smooth, Ballpoints, Stippling, Splatter, Leaky, Jitter, etc.
    • ....and literally hundreds more.
    You can even paint using brushes set as different grasses, mosses, barks, trees, clouds, etc.

    Yes it is more expensive than ArtRage but considering what you get and the amount of minor updates (which always include more brushes written by other users), the price is totally justified.

    As to it being a harder program to use; any program is only as hard as what you put into it.
     
  4. leaftye

    leaftye Old timer Super Moderator

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    I've had some stability issues with ArtRage. I'd happily pay much more for a program that doesn't lose my work and piss me off in the process. When it works, it's nice, but even then, it doesn't have many tools to draw with, and isn't extendable as far as I can tell.
     
  5. schroder999

    schroder999 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I've had some big projects dropped on me this week, so its been a little more busy than usual. I have downloaded the trial but haven't been up to trying it yet since I try not to demo new software on my client's projects and stick to things I know how to use. I will try it out in the near future and let you guys know. Number of brushes does not make a program great to me as painting and drawing to me is more in the fundamental skills of proportion, form, gesture, value, and color than it is mucking with a ton of brushes. Look to people like Craig Mullins and realize that he only uses photoshop. Programs like photoshop and painter allow you to make your own brushes as well. From my brief look twistedbrush has some brush options and layer modes that photoshop and painter do not but I have yet to test them to see how useful they are. Like artrage it lacks a scale/rotate tool which I would consider a bit of a shortcoming if I were to be using it as my only program. Thats just me though.

    Also as a side note, 72 DPI is ok for web work but if you want to go to print, 300 DPI is pretty much the standard for high quality printing. It doesn't take long to go over the 3000x3000 pixel mark if you are working in print as your standard sizes are 8.5x11, 11x17 and 6x9. This is not a problem unique to twistedbrush however, artrage is also sluggish at higher resolutions (as is painter).

    schroder
     
  6. RolandTumble

    RolandTumble Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Schroder:

    Since you are a (very) experienced digital painter, you might have even more trouble adjusting to one aspect of TB that sort of threw me (a mostly inexperienced painter), for a while:

    Not only does TB lack a scale/rotate (or if it's there it's hiding), it lacks the whole concept of selection. Instead it has extensive masking tools. In some ways this is just reciprocal: Rather than selecting the area to affect, you mask off the areas to protect. In other ways it's very different: You can't scale, rotate or move something if you can't select it to start with (an exception--you can move layers relative to each other, even though you can't move your marks within a layer). This is a closer match to non-digital work methods than it is to most other software.

    I don't want this thread to devolve into a TB how-to, since that's not what this forum is about. I just wanted to warn you about something that may feel uncomfortable at first, and encourage you to spend a bit of extra time working through the paradigm shift. TB was the first program in which I made a major investment, but I never expected it to be the only one. My other main art tools at this point are Inkscape (vector drawing) and The GIMP--both open source--but I will be adding Photoshop to the arsenal eventually.
     
  7. sleepy

    sleepy Aerospace Engineering

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    Wow you guys sound so advanced! While all I can do is draw a smiley face.

    So all this talk about drawing programs i forgot to mention or ask about using this programs with tablet pc? Is it alot better? How well does it.. reacth to the stylus tip? etc. Ah got to get back to work. bbl
     
  8. schroder999

    schroder999 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Scale/rotate is a huge timesaver in sketching. I understand that to emulate a sketchbook it doesn't go with the theme, but it truly is one of the biggest timesavers of using digital to be able to select/copy/paste/scale/transform elements of an image rather than redraw repetitious things (like lampposts or pillars, etc). That said, when free sketching for ideas or doing some things I don't use the tool that often but when I do I always feel it saved me a lot of time. I have noticed there is a way to duplicate a layer and use filters to transform its size and shape somewhat but without a select tool to pick out part of an image and move it to its own layer to apply the various transform filters it is still pretty limited. Both artrage and this program have this design flaw.

    In regards to your question, I enjoy sketching on my tabletpc quite a bit, it is vastly superior to using an external wacom tablet imo though there are professionals who have used normal wacom's for so long they have problems adapting to having their hand and pen obscure their drawing when they draw, the vast majority of people find it more intuitive/precise/fun to draw directly on the screen. There are a few things you have to get used to but I never had much problem with it.

    1) One is that no matter how fast your computer is, the pen cursor will always lag slightly behind the actual pen tip. The lag can be more or less depending on program, brush size, brush complexity, and image size.

    2) The parralax or offset between where your pen touches the screen and where the cursor actually appears. Because there is a layer of glass between the LCD and the pen, there is a gap - some models of tablet have more than others and it bothers some people more than others.

    3) The texture of the screen is generally much more slick than any natural media. Pencils, pens, and paint all have a certain amount of traction and feedback with the surface you draw on where the stylus often is moving over a glass like surface which can be hard to get used to if you have spent a lot of time getting used to the feel of natural media. If you're new to drawing in general it probably won't bother you that much.

    schroder
     
  9. P8RSON

    P8RSON Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    To counter the slick effect on a screen, I do recommend using 'felt nibs'.
    They do give better resistance when working on a glass screen.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  10. schroder999

    schroder999 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I've been using felt nibs for the last 2 months and while I do like the effect of the nibs, they wear out really fast if you draw a lot with them. Mine are sort of fraying and deformed at the tip and have been that way since about 1-2 weeks of putting them on. It hasn't stopped me from using them but I'm sure it would drive some people nuts. The other solution is to use a textured screen protector such as the Vitikui (sp?) ones from fujitsu which have a nice feel to them even with the standard nibs. I still haven't decided which path to go with on my new tablet but they are both viable solutions. Screen protectors have the added benefit of protecting your screen but can reduce the brightness a little bit.

    schroder
     
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