T5010 Capactive Screen

Discussion in 'Fujitsu' started by charco, Sep 15, 2009.

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  1. tlewis

    tlewis Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Kwik observations:
    Touch works for navigation now, today...even without Vista, without W7. In XP. I've been doing it for years on my x61t. Hitting links works fine. Ereading in slate mode is a dream. Relax. Enjoy.

    Stylus input is a popular flop - was from the outset. But it's not disappearing. It's been supported by niches since the beginning. Medicine... education... engineering... some design, etc. As they change, other markets will arise. Active digitizers will hang on - and improve. We'll still have our geeky pens. The general public could care less.

    As Frank suggests, more diversity is ahead. Fascinating tech times.
    t
     
  2. aretzios

    aretzios Scribbler - Standard Member

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    This may well be but I do not think so. What you seriously underestimate is the desire of the industry to cut costs and increase profit margins

    Maybe so. On the other hand, the stylus enabled a far more information oriented interfaces. Now, all you will have are huge buttons, large screens and little information. This is the process that I call "dumb-ing down" or as the industry calls it "consumer oriented". Your choice.

    Yes, I do believe that eventually active pens will vanish. It is nice to read your position below but it is simply not true. Tablets today are very fringe items and command high prices. A decent convertible tablet today well equipped costs around $2000 when most laptops with the same specs minus digitizers cost one third of this!!! Slate tablets are not offered by any first tier manufacturer and even convertible tablets have disappeared from 2nd tier vendors such as Acer/Gateway. So, the market does not reflect your optimism. Tablets with active digitizers are a dying breed. Taking notes, you said, with a stylus??? This is the killer application??? You must be joking!! What Apple and then MS would do is to attach a soft keyboard with some tactile feedback (or audible feedback) and allow you to take notes faster than with a stylus!! They would also attach a mike on these tablets and software that would transcribe the audible file! Where is the need for a stylus?? Forms software has to be reconfigured to work with touch and soft keyboards. Period. What planet are you guys living in??? The industry wants to remove the active digitizers because they are quite expensive!! Some will continue manufacturing laptops with active digitizers for some art projects but this territory would soon be ceded to Wacom with its tablets and some add ons. These are the trends and you are simply reinforcing them

    Just an example. How many people do you know who write documents and compose web pages on their laptops??? Many, I guess. How many of these have access to any (I repeat, any) laptop with a 4:3 aspect screen??? Have you tried to use a web authoring software that divides the screen (such as Expression and others) in a wide-aspect screen??? Dreadful, right? So, how come these screens disappeared (because they were expensive, despite their utility) and the stylus would hang on????
     
  3. aretzios

    aretzios Scribbler - Standard Member

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    tLewis, I agree. Fascinating times, but the stylus and the active digitizers are history. None would be around after 5 years, at most. As you noted, the public does not care. The territory of active digitizers would remain a fringe operation mostly the domain of Wacom that may or may not offer a convertible laptop in the future. Wacom may also offer a USB-powered screen add-on to attach an active digitizer. But the newer slate-format tablets both from MS and Apple would switch input mainly to touch and clever soft keyboards.
     
  4. Grimulkan

    Grimulkan Pen Pal - Newbie

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    @aretzios: I share your frustration with the widescreen situation, and I agree that major-brand markets do not necessarily head towards what is best for consumers, and especially not toward what niche consumers want. Perhaps you are right, and the stylus will be banished like the 4:3 high dpi screen, but I don't really know that for sure and I don't see the point in screaming about impending doom.

    For now, I hope companies like NTrig (though they suck) and Wacom will keep the stylus business alive, at least by creating dual-mode digitzers with multitouch so large companies will incorporate them anyway. Otherwise, niche consumers who buy stuff to fill their needs (and not the other way around) will eventually need to pay a premium to buy from select manufacturers, or DIY, like you said.
     
  5. adretzios

    adretzios Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Maybe you are right. I am not screaming, I am just frustrated because so many just do not vote with their dollars for what they really want and they allow themselves to be carried through by clever industry marketing. For example, until the T61, Lenovo produced the Thinkpad with both 4:3 and 16:10 screens. Soon afterwards, the 4:3 1400 x 1100 screens went the way of the dodo and now consumers have only access to screens of lower resolution. We are just a flock of sheep and these guys in the corporate suites are laughing at us all the way to the bank. They have somehow convinced the average consumer that lower resolution and wider screens are good because all they do is just watch movies!!!! If this is not brainwashing, I do not know what it is.

    Actually, the disappeared high-resolution screens were a great fit for tablets and there were indeed tablets that supported this high resolution, made by Toshiba. Why and how did we allow them to peddle to us $2000 tablets with lower resolution screens and cheaper digitizers? You tell me!!

    Wacom is already doing this. They are going to be introducing tablets with multitouch and good digitizers but this is their niche. I am not going to spend my money on this. I have an 12'' x 18'' Tablet on my desktop and using it and the mouse gives me a much higher level of accuracy than touching the damned tablet. But, I am sure, others will flock to buy the product. Wacom would probably add multitouch on their Cintiq line, where it may be better utilized. In any case, this is the road that we would be going down.

    Digitizers would disappear along with convertible laptops. Let's admit it, they have not been a great success story but we love them, right??? They do certain tasks that very little else can achieve. But companies are not producing in large quantities, they are outrageously expensive and they are a dying breed. What frustrates me here is that most are just cheering along without really understanding what they are cheering about.

    What would the tablet be in 3 years time? It would be a very thin slate with multitouch only on a color e-paper, with a soft keyboard like that of the iphone (they may provide some tactile response) and they are going to be "netbook" centric. They would contain a number of radios for connectivity. Their form factor and battery life would inhibit the addition of graphics muscle to do anything close to that we want to do. Multitouch would gravitate to most netbooks and notebooks (Lenovo has introduced a number of them).
     
  6. aretzios

    aretzios Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Here is an "imagining" of how the new MS tablet would look like. I do not really know how close to reality this is going to be:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmIgNfp-MdI&feature=player_embedded#t=115

    It is going to be a dedicated slate, probably running some variant of Win7 or maybe embedded Win7 or WinMo 7. As soon as these tablets get unleashed, software for vertical applications (medical records, form filling) would be produced for them and convertible tablets like the T5010 would be no more than history.
     
  7. Grimulkan

    Grimulkan Pen Pal - Newbie

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  8. aretzios

    aretzios Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I have never indicated that the stylus in MS produced tablets would disappear immediately. In fact, I gave a range of 5 years for the process to be concluded. Even then, I said that it would survive in fringe products but because these products would be "fringe", their appeal would be limited.

    My guess is that the current tablets would have the same lifetime as Win7. Win8 would be coming out in about 2012 and at that point, the current generation of processors and CPUs would need a definitive refress. Until then, the T5010 would remain quite usable.
     
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