SXGA+ Resolution on the x61t

Discussion in 'Lenovo (IBM)' started by cheesyp18, Jul 4, 2007.

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  1. cheesyp18

    cheesyp18 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I'm trying to decide between the SXGA+ and the MT/MV with XGA. I did some calculations and I find that the SXGA+ screen offers 144.63 pixels per inch. I currently use a resolution on my desktop that is only 88 ppi, which I am defintely used to.

    Anyway, I just changed my desktop resolution so that its about 142 ppi and damn the text is small. However, I like the space too. The text is just barely big enough that I can read it without squinting or moving closer, but I think my eyes would like me better if text could be a bit larger. I'm all for the extra space, but is there any way in Vista to make the text slightly larger while keeping the nice resolution? I know in browsers you can increase and stuff, but is there an option in Vista that can change font sizes directly in the GUI? If not, I might just have to save my eyes and go with the XGA (the MT doesn't really matter for me though). Thanks!
     
  2. dp22

    dp22 Tablet Fan

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    If you're struggling, get the XGA. When I got the SXGA+ model, it was remarkably smaller than I was used to. However, my eyes adjusted. I should also probably mention that I'm 22, so my eyes are still young. If you've got reading glasses, stick with XGA.

    Oh and if I had to do it all over again... I'd still get the SXGA+.:D
     
  3. hmorgan25

    hmorgan25 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Sure, you can increase the size of the text in almost anything anymore. windows, outlook, IE, etc.

    Just right click on the desktop, choose properties, "Window Color and Apearance", click advanced, under the "item" pull down, play with those settings, but remember what they were prior to changing them, in case it's not what you wanted.
     
  4. cheesyp18

    cheesyp18 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I'm also young, 18 in fact. Can the small font actually hurt your eyes? I am nearsighted and my eyes are just starting to stabilize, so I dont want to send my eyes into another tailspin by trying to adjust to minuscule font lol.
     
  5. P8RSON

    P8RSON Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    High resolution screens and incorrect screen refresh rates will over a period of time hurt your eyes.... just as not taking breaks every 20 minutes or so.

    When I was 18, my eyes were a perfect 20/20.
    Now, some 36 years later, just like my Brother, bad monitor settings have taken their toll... but I'm lucky.. I take care of my eyesight these days... Just as I hope you too will. :)
     
  6. xfire

    xfire Pen Pal - Newbie

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    It wasn't bad monitor settings. It is the amount of time spent focusing at a specific focal distance, and deterioration in the muscles that focus, and hardening of the lens. If you had spend all that time reading paper books at a reading desk you would e in the same condition. (Truck drivers get the opposite condition - farsightedness)

    Hey team. Smaller pixels (higher resolution in smaller dispalys:1450*1050*12.1:) provides finer detail in rendering small, legible text. That results in faster reading and higher comprehension. And so does increased brightness and higher contrast. That is why 300dpi laser printing is easier and faster to read than your 96dpi screen.

    There are many controls within Windows and applications to control the size of things on the screens. Text size is essentially independent of the screen resolution.

    Buy the smallest pitch (dpi-dots per inch) printer or monitor you can afford with the size (inches-{8.5*11;12.1 diagonal,etc.}) required for your use of the device.

    The participants in this thread that are choosing the XGA because they don't like the appearance of the SXGA+ are going to sacrifice speed and comprehension in their use of their machines.
     
  7. P8RSON

    P8RSON Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I did say
    which equates to the amount of time spent focasing... etc.

    But bad monitor settings do also contribute to eye strain and headaches.
     
  8. xfire

    xfire Pen Pal - Newbie

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    But not vision degradation.

    Myopia and presbyopia (the need for adult onset glasses) comes from aging and vocational specific eye usage.

    My training says eye strain (burning soreness) comes exclusively from glare. I don't know anything specific about headaches.

    Neck aches come from elbow height, not from monitor position, in my catechism.

    I'm optimistic that the X61 tablet scheduled to arrive at my home today will have a glare free, finely detailed screen that I can use in an easychair without any eye strain, using my trifocals. (from too may years at a computer screen: 39)

    By the way, I didn't need glasses at all until I was 35 years old.
     
  9. P8RSON

    P8RSON Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Similar to me but some 20yrs. on because I look after them I've not had need to increase the lens. :)
     
  10. Michael-P

    Michael-P Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I think it would be nice, if somebody could post pics from the screnn with different dpi settings...
    personally i only think the mt/mv screen is the better solution because of the price(in Germany),SXGA+ is not really affordable...
     
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