Surface Pro 7

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by dstrauss, Jun 25, 2019.

  1. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    With Tom’s Guide reporting that SP7 will get USB-C but not Thunderbolt - is it time to give up on Surface Pro? Maybe they are saving that for SB3 - and if SB3 includes other options like an alternate Type Cover,etc, then let the SP line become the WOA test bed with 5g. All in all the glacial speed of MS advancement in the entire Surface line is beginning to be a boring bust.

    That’s sad because they were the solid hope for a truly tablet/laptop converged device - no more.
     
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  2. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    This is pure hope on my part, but if they do keep the surface pro lines and the surface book 2 lines, my hope is that they double or triple down on the tablet functionality of the pro. e.g make it thinner, lighter and substantially reduced bezels. I'd even be ok with ARM if the new Snapdragon platform performs as well as the hype claims.

    On the book at least for the 13, add a kickstand and make the keyboard more like the surface pro, or at least make it an option.
    With the Book, they have to add TB3 as a minimum to be competitive , at least in the space that I think they see themselves competing with (HP Spectre and MacBook pro)
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2019
  3. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    @desertlap - I understand your thinking. but the Surface Pro is no longer "Pro" if they release it without TB3 support. Period. If they "blend" the Surface Pro into the SB3 design, that's fine, but then they will only have Surface and Surface Book - the tablet only device is no longer "Pro."
     
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  4. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Yeah my thinking definitely ventures in to the " if I were CEO " category.

    That being said, at least in our little corner of the world, the Surface Go has more or less gutted the surface pro sales. In other words if they need a highly mobile device, they buy a go, if they need a more powerful system they buy a SB2. That's almost 100% true in my own company and it's trending strongly that way in our customer base. eg. lots of inquiries and support for the go, but pro questions have dropped dramatically.
     
  5. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    If I was buying a laptop type device, it would probably be a Thinkpad yoga. The Surface Book misses the mark in too many ways to pay the price that Microsoft is extracting for it.

    Personally, I find that I just don't need the power (even when pressing my Go into service as a chart plotter). It's all Go for me. Still, I could see Microsoft dropping the Go if they make the pro-line into a smaller footprint by adding an infinity display.:vbfrown:
     
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  6. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    The go is a highly capable device and a big part of why my company now supplies it as the default device for our employees. I know, lots here groan when I say it, but the performance is more than "good enough" for a large plurality of users.

    It really does hit the corporate sweet spot of $1000 for a fully kitted out device with solid performance, and maximum flexibility.

    It just strikes me that more and more the Surface Pro, without some type of rework is the odd man out.

    I also agree about the Yoga. MS seems to have more or less ceded that particular niche to Lenovo.
     
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  7. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Ok so here's a question: how many of those Go users would take the larger screen of the SP, if the size/weight and price remain comparable at the "magic sweetspot"?

    In my thinking, the 10" screen on Go is just a tad too small to be ideal as a default replacement device. Bump that up to ~12" (by killing the bezels), and now you've really got the perfect corporate daily driver. ;)
     
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  8. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    Now that is an interesting thought. The 8cx ARM power that I expect to see in one of the Surface Models this fall is ideal for the Go. I am just concerned that MS will put it in the wrong device and stick us with a 13" infinity Pro.

    The Go is such a portable device that it cries out for 5G ARM power. It's so obvious that I can't imagine Microsoft not getting this completely wrong.:vbcool:

    I find the 10" screen on the Go to be ideal. I would be disappointed with a larger device. I find the pro size awkward for one handed reading like you can so naturally with the Go.
     
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  9. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I completely agree that the go is the obvious choice for a 5G/ARM based solution.

    @Marty I agree with you personally that 10 inch is a bit cramped for productivity, but I also admit my own biases in thinking that.

    I haven't seen any analysis of the demographics of the "go user" so that makes me wonder what the "typical" usage is. I know definitely within our company and with a bit less certainty in our customer base, that the go is only a part time standalone device and that the majority of the time it's docked for at least connected to a larger display and keyboard/mouse. I'm sure that it varies considerably but again using my own anecdotal observation of my own company, I'd say the split is 70% "docked" and 30% standalone. e.g. docked at the desk most of the time and stand alone in meetings or when traveling.

    Last but not least, the model I have in mind is what Apple seems to be doing where you have the base model iPad which is the majority of users and/or the entry model and the iPad Pro which represents the highest performance and best technology in that form factor.

    So for MS the go, becomes the mainstream device and the pro becomes the statement device.
     
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  10. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I’m curious....how well we’re the Surface Pro 1 & 2 received at your company? And in regards to the Go dominating the Pro.....would say it’s fully because of portability....or price? Like if a more powerful...full core i5 $800-$1000 Surface Go came out, would it still be a top choice for your company?

    Given the Surface Go’s popularity in the corporate market.......it would seem a logical step....or what Microsoft should do......shrink the Pro back to 10.6 inches, as the original pros were. It was my understanding that the Pro 3’s larger screen is what made it more of a success over the Pro 1 & 2.....but perhaps that trend has pulled a 180 more or less.
     
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