Surface Pro 4 Predictions

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by dstrauss, Mar 20, 2015.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. soh5

    soh5 Wait and Hope (Bronsky et al.) Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,365
    Likes Received:
    695
    Trophy Points:
    131
    Agreed with Bronsky, I am sure Intel has a partnership with Microsoft so that they get early access to the skylake chips.
     
  2. gcoupe

    gcoupe Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    808
    Likes Received:
    141
    Trophy Points:
    56
    Well, it wouldn't be the first time that Microsoft has snatched defeat from the jaws of victory...
     
    Bronsky likes this.
  3. FenderP

    FenderP Scribbler - Standard Member

    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    81
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Depends where they are in the cycle with these things. To get the SP4 out for Christmas (back to school/college is out), this thing basically needs to be ready to roll by late September/early October. That means that within the next few months, some manufacturer will be already starting to make these things.

    Is it possible Intel will give MS enough chips early on? Sure. I just think it's unrealistic. I do think a SP4 will be announced in the timeframe around the W10 launch, but I'm thinking more September/October than July/August.


    As an aside regarding processors, there will always be something newer and possibly better coming. At some point you just need to buy.
     
  4. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,479
    Likes Received:
    1,202
    Trophy Points:
    231
    I've never understood this argument. I mean, yes, there's always something newer, but there's generally pretty well defined roadmaps for this stuff. I mean, you wouldn't buy an iPhone 6 right now, with new ones likely to be announced next month, would you? Or a Galaxy Note 4 when the 5 is coming very soon? Sure, everything gets outdated fast, but if you want to maximize your investment, it makes the most sense to buy right at the beginning of a cycle, not near the end.
     
    Bronsky likes this.
  5. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,313
    Likes Received:
    2,060
    Trophy Points:
    331
    Generally, I agree with your sentiment, but in this case it may depend on how deep the discounts get near the end of the cycle... although, maybe the discounts will get even better right after the new one comes out.

    Either way it is still strategic purchase timing vs. buy it whenever ... which I think was your point =P
     
    bloodycape and Bronsky like this.
  6. FenderP

    FenderP Scribbler - Standard Member

    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    81
    Trophy Points:
    41
    I would never buy a Galaxy or an iPhone, but I know someone who just bought an iPhone 6. For most people, the difference between a 6 and 6s gets met with a "meh". Outside of people on boards like this, your average consumer does not care what the difference is between Broadwell and Skylake. Intel missed ship dates on Broadwell initially, so it could happen again. Japanese manufacturers update laptops between 3 and 6 months, even if it's minor. Again, most people don't care. I don't think Skylake will be THAT much better than Broadwell, much like I did not find Broadwell to be that much better than Haswell in terms of what I do. Broadwell has had a short cycle if Skylake comes on time.

    That said, ironically, the Core M has surprised me the most - and in a good way.

    You get much more bang for your buck today than you ever did in the past. Today's $1000 - $2000 laptop/tablet with an i7 smokes what used to run me $3k+. I just ordered the Vaio Z Canvas and it's crazy how much it is for what I'm getting. Something not even that close out of the box cost me $5k(ish) two years ago. It is not priced for everyone, but I have a need now for it. So what if it gets Skylake in the US release or in 2016?
     
  7. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,426
    Likes Received:
    2,594
    Trophy Points:
    231
    This interests me. Here in Japan people are dissapointed that the Vaio seems to climb on in the path formed by Sony. The only company that can charge a premium for its products in Japan is Apple. People were expecting Vaio to come down in price and compete on it being a better product qualitywise. The normal comparison here is to a fully equipped Surface Pro 3, and my understanding is that the same configuration on the Vaio is almost 60 000 yen more (app. $500). A common comment here is that they didn't just by the Vaio division from Sony, they got its management team too, and they can't dig themselves out of the rut they've fallen into.
     
  8. bloodycape

    bloodycape confused Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,813
    Likes Received:
    429
    Trophy Points:
    101
    But, it sort of makes sense for the Vaio to cost more as it's coming with a full voltage haswell quad-core cpu
     
  9. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,426
    Likes Received:
    2,594
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Ok, but is the price difference as big as $500? I simply don't know.

    Twitter is to communications as haiku is to literature.
     
  10. FenderP

    FenderP Scribbler - Standard Member

    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    81
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Given the fact that they crammed a FULL processor in there (not a U), had to do engineering around fans and batteries, etc., just R&D alone - it is to me. Plus, it's got all the ports I need - including ethernet. The SP3 has crap for ports, which is one of my biggest gripes (along with the fact that running anything like VMs gets it all heated up and its fan is terrible; my Core M Panasonic is better and handles my workload better). So it's not just the processor; it's a fundamentally different design and approach than the SP3. This is a workstation(ish) thing in a small form factor. The processor price is relevant, but at the same time, irrelevant.

    Well, Vaio is still 5% Sony owned ;) The one thing Sony - and now Vaio - did/do is these small, pretty lightweight, funky form factors with good specs. I love how people are calling the Z Canvas not portable. With the Type Cover, the SP3 is close to 2.5lbs. If you stick with Vaio's keyboard, this is about 3.5, or close to what the Duo 11 was without the extended battery. Now, I liked the Duo 11. That's a story for another day.

    The problem with Vaio now is that they are so small, and making hardware has small margins, they can't always come in cheaper so they are selling to a degree on quality. The Made in Japan aspect is not lost on some, as some of the critics of Sony's later stuff assembled elsewhere had not too great QC in some cases (See: Pro 13/11, and especially its wireless; my Pro 13 was the one of the worst laptops I've owned. Very pretty and lightweight, but blech.). Any of my Japan-made Vaios (U70P, Z90, two different Gs) were impeccable. Plus, there's R&D they need to recoup. It's a chicken/egg thing.

    Also, see my response above - the Z Canvas is a fundamentally different computer/market. Microsoft is targeting the "everman/woman". How many people need a quad core full proc, 1TB of SSD, and 16GB memory with a full compliment of ports? I do, and willingly am paying for it. Joe/Jane Average Consumer? Not at all.

    Keep in mind that less than 10 years ago we were paying $4 - $4.5k for a top spec'd Sony VAio T series which was ULV, etc. With the exchange rate, the 16/1TB Z Canvas is about $3300 now. That's amazing, but also out of reach for most people. Just putting it all in perspective.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2015
    bloodycape and Kumabjorn like this.
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page