Surface Go

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by Tourniquet, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. ykf

    ykf Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi all, I'm on the fence of buying SG LTE, but first I need to know whether it is possible to use as a mobile hotspot provider. I mean, will it shut down the shared connection if the SG screen is being switched off? I mainly use SG for traveling, and during that time I need to share the LTE with my phone. I wonder if this is possible in an extended duration. Can any SG LTE user comments on that? Thanks!
     
  2. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member

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    So take this for what it is which is a snapshot from a low medium sized tech oriented company. I read the aforementioned articles and wanted to see what my own company saw.

    For Q4 for our company employees, the surface go was our top purchased device being slightly over 50% of the devices. This compares to same quarter last year which was a fairly even split between the surface pro 2017, and two Lenovo yogas. For some context to that , we replace all employees machines on a 3-4 year basis.

    On the customer support side which is within my group, for the last two months of 2018, the go was the most logged system in December and was second in November behind the MacBook Air.

    That coupled with what MS keeps telling us (that the go is the fastest selling surface model in corporate) shows me that the go is a big success.
    I expect we will see more of them possibly with core y and ARM processors this year.

    As I've said the go anecdotally seems to hit the sweet spot between price, performance and versatility. And the employees in our company that have had their various thinkpads or in some cases desktops replaced are thrilled with them.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2019
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  3. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    At a meeting yesterday with a half-dozen lawyers, three surfaces came out of counsel's briefcases. There wasn't an iPad in view.
     
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  4. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Not surprised. Anecdotally there are different "camps" of users and they all have their preferred tools. e.g

    Met with a visual design team yesterday and half had iPad pros and the rest had MacBook pros. Met with one of our engineering partners this morning and it was a mix of surface book 2 and Surface pro (no go though) and no macs either.
     
  5. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Has your company ever considered doing an internal usage study? For example, documenting the types of activities and workflows each group engages in.

    It would be interesting to see if this divide is purely aesthetic, and each group has in fact come up with different solutions to the same types of problems.

    Another interesting thing this might reveal is which design language/UI cues each group has grown accustomed to, and how each group approaches a new problem differently based on these interface paradigms.
     
  6. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    I know this is the traditional Apple/Windows split, but I would think it would break by professional/application lines: artists and designers use Apple products and business and engineering use Windows based products, the only difference being that the TPCR digital artist folk tend towards Windows because Macs don't use pens and IOS lacks a "real" OS.
     
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  7. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    This deserved :thumbsup::thumbsup: thumbs up!

    In the last "roundtable" I had it was equally iPads, Windows, and yellow legal pads...:vbrolleyes:
     
  8. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member

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    We have but it's been at least two years or more (mid 2016) ago, so we should do it again.

    The last time it sort of split in three very general ways both internally and with our customer base e.g.
    1. Mac OS/IOS- graphic arts pros and creative types, lots of creative cloud users etc. Most Macbook pros and some iMacs. This was before Apple had serious offering ala iPad Pro

    2. General office productivity- virtually all windows and a mix of laptops and desktops. At the time very little tablet penetration other than a few surface pros here and there. Dell was the single biggest vendor by device (mostly latitudes)

    3. Engineering applications- about 50% laptops versus desktops. No surface devices. Lots of think pads and dell precision devices.

    I think I may have mentioned though that we have seen a huge uptick in surface devices in our customer base in general in the last couple of years in and that it accelerated quite a bit with the go this year. This is based on what our support group is seeing with customers contacting us for support issues.

    Last time we did any analytics it was more focused on what they used versus why, but I think when we do it again, that will be a bigger feature.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
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  9. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Naturally, but what I've noticed is there is significant overlap in workflows between professions. For example, I've worked as both a graphic designer and electrical engineer.

    In both cases, I've had to produce vector-based drawings one in Illustrator and another in CAD, however, the tool interfaces--when you get to the bottom of it--are not that much different. They are both very concerned with dimensioning, exact specification of object properties (eg. color, RC values), and documentation of metadata (document page/figure, part numbers, etc.)

    What I'd like to see is a study of how much of the difference in interface aids the user's "thought process" in problem-solving vs. how much is just user's getting accustomed to a certain button/menu layout.

    Yes, please. :)

    I find the "platform-wars" debates on the internet so tiring. Everybody trying unilaterally declare one approach better, instead of analyzing what aspects of the UX design is conducive for what parts of the workflow.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
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  10. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    Among Mac friends I've recently noted rising frustration with the OS. They believe Apple is "dumbing down the OS" to fuse it with iOS in the not too distant future. Now, these are hard core fanboys, so it's not like they are going to switch. But it is interesting to note a more Apple critical tone in their language.

    Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk
     
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