Surface Book Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by DRTigerlilly, Oct 6, 2015.

  1. Mr. Boosh

    Mr. Boosh Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Probably for the sake of time. He'd have to load the game, get to a point where it taxes the machine, load the next one, etc, etc. Not like he had 20 minutes to dedicate to that.
     
  2. alextrela182

    alextrela182 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Microsoft Surface Book (Core i5, Nvidia GPU) Notebook Review
    http://www.notebookcheck.net/Microsoft-Surface-Book-Core-i5-Nvidia-GPU-Notebook-Review.153126.0.html


    Pro
    + high quality magnesium alloy chassis
    + notebook-class CPU and GPU performance in a detachable form factor
    + no major CPU or GPU throttling
    + high resolution, bright display fit for outdoor use
    + native 3:2 aspect ratio for full-frame SLRs
    + accurate colors and high contrast; 96 percent sRGB coverage
    + comfortable keyboard and touchpad
    + full GPU power on batteries
    + NVMe SSD standard

    Cons
    - thicker and heavier than 13- or 14-inch Ultrabooks
    - battery life could be better
    - no USB Type-C or HDMI options
    - no WWAN or RJ-45 options
    - no SmartCard or fingerprint reader
    - no secondary storage options
    - no TrackPoint or dedicated mouse keys
    - native 3:2 aspect ratio not ideal for video or gaming
    - software-enabled detaching can be buggy
    - difficult end-user upgradeability
    - warm keyboard and tablet when under heavy loads
    - costly


    Verdict
    In review: Microsoft Surface Book.
    [​IMG]
    One of the main goals of a detachable notebook is to replace both the user's tablet and notebook with a 2-in-1 solution. The outcome is usually less than perfect with spotty quality, poor keyboard, a heavy display, less features, and slower performance as the core hardware must fit into a tablet form factor.

    The Surface Book is easily one of the best detachables currently in the market. It addresses most of these concerns directly with excellent build quality from top to bottom, a backlit keyboard that feels better than on many Ultrabooks, a relatively lightweight display with a narrow bezel, and notebook-like performance from its unique attachable Nvidia GPU. Aside from a few bugs when attaching and detaching the tablet, everything about the Surface Book works incredibly well with little to complain. The fulcrum hinge has its disadvantages mainly from an aesthetic point-of-view as the notebook can never fully close in the traditional sense, but it is functionally superior to switch-lock hinges and magnets commonly found on other detachables like the Transformer Book Chi or Toshiba Portege Z20t. For a $1500 device, this is quality hardware with no cut corners.

    What we don't like about the Surface Book is what's not included. Its bare design gives a sense of missing features such as no HDMI-out and no WWAN, the latter of which is surprising considering its portable and versatile design motif. Unlike the Surface Pro series where the tablet can hold its own, the Surface Book tablet is stripped of any and all ports except for a sole 3.5 mm audio jack. There is also a lack of secondary storage, which is something we hope Microsoft will address in future iterations by including an optional HDD or SSD into the keyboard dock itself. The Surface Book is very clearly a notebook first and a tablet second - opposite to the Surface Pro 3 or Surface Pro 4.

    Do we recommend the Surface Book over a traditional notebook? Anyone who is already set on a detachable-type notebook should consider the Microsoft solution as it is a serious contender for replacing an aging Ultrabook. However, users who have little interest in the dGPU or mostly use their computers for browsing, word processing, and multimedia playback will find lighter, thinner, and less expensive solutions in the form of newer Ultrabooks with potentially more features.

    For core business users, the ThinkPad, EliteBook, and Latitude are all stronger options with vital features that the Surface Book is sorely missing. For everyone else, this is as close to an Apple MacBook alternative from Microsoft that Windows enthusiasts will get.
     
    Zeelobby and Luft like this.
  3. Zeelobby

    Zeelobby Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Seems pretty accurate. I mean a lot of the price for the SB is the novelty. There are def more powerful machines out there. I'd even argue that the SP4 has more value, but if you want exactly what the SB gives, you only have one option.

    Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
     
  4. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I have zero interest in the form factor of the Book, but I have to say that a ton of those cons are ridiculously niche problems that don't even seem worth writing about. I mean, even within the business category, most of those things are unnecessary these days.
     
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  5. timumi

    timumi Pen Pal - Newbie

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    To me, the Surface Book was designed for people who:
    • Always carries a laptop and tablet everywhere.
    • Want the best performance in both forms.
    • Need relatively thin and light form compared to screen size
    • Need active stylus for precise work.
    Complaining about its price and missing ports while comparing it to a laptop/tablet without the same features is not fair.
     
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  6. GaresTaylan

    GaresTaylan Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I was just thinking this exact same thing. No RJ-45? Get an adapter. Apple has been doing this for years. These reviewers need to take into consideration the type of product they are reviewing. That's like reviewing a base model Camry and complaining that it doesn't have 500HP. If you want to complain about HP then review a vehicle that falls into that category.

    I feel like everytime a new product comes out some of these reviewers just look for things to cry about. Lets make a device too thin to sport RJ-45 but then complain that it doesn't have one. Lets make a device that has a RJ-45 and then complain that it isnt thin enough.
     
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  7. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Even worse to me with the Smart Card feature they mention. Windows 8 introduced virtual Smart Cards using the TPM, and the Book has that feature available.

    While I have no doubt that there are still some companies / government agencies that still want a physical Smart Card, how many fractions of a percent of users are in that category?
     
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  8. czm2000

    czm2000 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    ... And made thick enough to support RJ-45 the complaint would be it isn't thin enough. Good grief.
     
  9. digitallysane

    digitallysane Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Beyond stupid.
     
  10. derylmccarty

    derylmccarty Pen Pal - Newbie

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    The pro and con blog is ok...but it needs translator: EG:

    yada, high quality Mg, yada, yada, form factor --> high quality manufacturing and engineering. Probably durable and you can be seen with it in public without embarrassment - maybe even with a bit of pride.

    yada, yada, i7, memory, dGPU yada --> not a toy, not a gaming machine, serious business.

    yada, 3:2, no stick mouse, not enough ports but has a dock --> this is not an Apple nor Lenovo (IBM) product, its a Microsoft product.

    Buggy, yada, yada --> new product, new product category so be careful.

    costly, yada --> frigging expensive but if it fits what you want to do with the machine, go for it!
     
    Steve S and Telstar1948 like this.
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