Surface Book Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by DRTigerlilly, Oct 6, 2015.

  1. surfaceproartist

    surfaceproartist Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    @wataru I agree 100% with @dstrauss, I think you'll be very disappointed to have spent all that extra money for the laptop when it sounds like you really only want the tablet.
     
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  2. ikjadoon

    ikjadoon Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Paul Thurott and Mary Jo Foley agree with me (as noted on the latest episode of Windows Weekly). It's better to give consumers a longer delivery date than to make them come back to the same site again and again, just to check if it's available. Pretty simple idea.

    You also should listen to the Windows Weekly podcast. Paul, correctly, explains that "sold out" doesn't mean much for a product that you're continuously producing...it's better to just push back the delivery date.
     
  3. AmbiDextrose

    AmbiDextrose Scribbler - Standard Member

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    OK - some perspective on the pricing of the current top-end Surface Book:
    • 6th Gen 2.6GHz Intel Core i7-6600U with Intel HD graphics 520
    • 16GB memory (DDR3 or DDR4?)
    • 512GB SSD
    • 13.5in 3000 x 2000 (3:2) display
    • Custom NVidia GPU with 1GB GDDR5 buffer in keyboard/base unit
    • Premium build and finish
    • Detachable "Clipboard" screen
    • "Rip-n-flip" design tablet mode for writing
    • 2nd battery in keyboard/base unit
    • PixelSense ES digitizer and pen (1024 levels, no tilt, no rotation)
    • 1.6lbs (tablet only)
    • 3.48lbs
    • $2,699.00
    Compared to a current fully decked-out Fujitsu T935:
    • 5th Gen 2.6GHz Intel Core i7-5600U with Intel HD 5500 graphics
    • 8GB DDR3 memory
    • 512GB SSD
    • 13.3in 2560 x 1440 (16:9) display
    • MIL-STD-810G rated
    • Convertible TabletPC design
    • Wacom EMS digitizer and pen (512 levels, no tilt, no rotation)
    • 3.5lbs
    • $3,224.00
    Or a current fully-loaded Fujitsu Q755 with the powered keyboard dock:
    • 5th Gen 2.6GHz Intel Core i7-5600U with Intel HD 5500 graphics
    • 8GB DDR3 memory
    • 512 SSD
    • 13.3in 1920x1080 (16:9) display
    • MIL-STD-810G rated
    • Slate TabletPC design
    • 2nd battery in keyboard/dock unit
    • Wacom EMS digitizer and pen (512 levels, no tilt, no rotation)
    • 2.2lbs (tablet only)
    • $2,548.00
    It is inevitable (unless something drastic happens) that Fujitsu would upgrade the T and Q lines to Intel's 6th Gen processors - maybe one with an Iris or even an Iris Pro IGP. They may also go with higher-resolution screens and (hopefully) retain the Wacom EMS digitizer. However, Fujitsu almost always prices their high-end gear out of the general and even business consumers. If Fujitsu's history is any indication, the updated version of the T935 might be pushing $3,500 to nearly $4,000.00.
     
  4. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    Never ever customize a Fujitsu device. You can get the fully-decked-out i5 for for $2000 if you buy preconfigured. 256GB SSD but you get LTE and a fingerprint scanner (and user-serviceable battery, RAM, and SSD). Sold out at the moment. Configuring a Fujitsu device is bad, expensive idea.
     
  5. AmbiDextrose

    AmbiDextrose Scribbler - Standard Member

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    The point was to compare like-for-like. You can only get an i7 and SSDs in the T935 when you customize your order.

    Regardless, a preconfigured T935 with an 5th Gen Intel i5-5300U with 8GB and a 500GB SATA disk is $1,599.00 while a Surface Book with a 6th Gen Intel i5-6300U with 8GB and a 256GB SSD is onlt $100.00 more at $1,699.00 while the version with the dGPU (same CPU, RAM and SSD) is at $1,899.00
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2015
  6. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    Tangent to your point, but while your stuck with the i5 if you order one with it, the SSD is easily user upgradeable (for a fraction of the cost).

    I think the SB pricing is fine for the market it is aiming at (MacBook Pro sized wallets). The OEMs can fill in for the more budget consious windows users. There are definately better bang/buck devices to be had, and I think that is how MS wants it to be. The SB is for those that want no expense spared and no corners cut for the sake of price. Hence the apparent effort that went in to engineering details like the dynamic fulcrum hinge, muscle wire, etc. MS isn't trying to get a SB in everyones hands their trying to set standard for the best of what a windows device can be... sparing no expense. That means putting effort into things that don't show up on a spec sheet comparison.
     
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  7. Mr. Boosh

    Mr. Boosh Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Trying to seriously understand your thought process. What are you using this machine for? You preordered a SB with a dGPU, but you were going to just leave the keyboard at home? You realize you'd be tied to a wall outlet every 3 hours charging the thing?

    Maybe your current setup + $100 Kindle would be the better choice.
     
  8. czm2000

    czm2000 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    That wasn't my point and I even said that while you may be right about the running out part, my point was mostly addressing your opinion that they had only introduced concept models and were going to wait to make them until they had orders was undoubtedly not possible, and not the reason they would run out. Not some hypothetical, or conspiracy type theory, but just plain demand exceeding supply.

    Also, just because someone can find another to agree with them (podcast or otherwise) does not a fact make. If that were true the world would still be flat.

    I'm of the mind that a company should not stop taking orders if they run out, but rather change the customers expectations about the delivery date.
     
  9. GaresTaylan

    GaresTaylan Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Yea this doesn't make much sense to me, either. Lots of complaints about the surface book having things they don't want but then they order it.
     
  10. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    I was just thinking about your use case with the SB. Even ignoring the upside down problem, what would you do about the fact that the SB only opens up at a 45 degree angle?
     
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