Surface Book Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by DRTigerlilly, Oct 6, 2015.

  1. czm2000

    czm2000 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    That doesn't make much sense when you consider supply chain management. Not to knock your opinion, but they would have had to order the necessary components back in August (most likely) to meet any pre-sold orders in October.

    While you may be correct about it not being a good thing to run out, this is just a good old fashion case of they sold more than they had parts to build. It really can be that simple.

    And rather than not be able to meet their "Ships By Oct 24th" commitment they had to pull certain models from pre-order.

    That's all.
     
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  2. delimeat567

    delimeat567 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Agreed. It should be more important to meet existing preorders from a consumer-oriented point of view. But, the fact that the product is sold out is still a good sign - even if it does mean they lose some customers.

    Customer preference would also matter. Surface Book is (dare I say) an entirely unique product. No one can quite bring the same features to the table with the same quality. Sure, you could get an ASUS Transformer for far less, but it really is not designed for the same audience/purpose. So, does Microsoft really lose that many sales for their unique flagship product when they do not yet really have any competition in the exact market?

    Again, all that being said, if you were willing to bend your specifications a bit, you could probably settle for a SP4, or any number of other 2-in-1 laptops from ASUS, Acer, Lenovo, HP, etc.
     
  3. Mr. Boosh

    Mr. Boosh Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    You've learned all you need to know about business in Economics 101. I think you can leave college now and become CEO of a mega-corporation.

    You're ready.
     
  4. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    Send it to Bernie Sanders...he'll have a sympathetic, but equally impotent, ear...
     
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  5. rebelismo

    rebelismo Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I personally think that the tilt functionality is a bit over rated to be honest. I've used plenty of portable penabled computers, and have owned cintiqs and regular wacom tablets. In my opinion it comes down to screen size, tip feel, and pressure sensitivity. I work with people who ink and color on a daily basis, and they almost never use the tilt function. Plenty of my friends use both the CC2 and the Surface, and it really is about having a professional art device which supports the necessary application ecosystem. If you're looking for a digital sketchbook, I think you can use just about the majority of cheap penabled tablets out there. If you're looking for a professional art device that runs Painter, Photoshop, PaintStorm, Clip Paint, and even Premiere, After Effects, Maya, Zbrush etc, then it's between the Wacom portable machines and the Surface Pro/Book line. The great thing about the Surface Book though is the Nvidia GPU which comes in handy with a lot of professional applications.
     
  6. Telstar1948

    Telstar1948 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I had an Apple Lisa (their first business "Mac") and it had a 10 MB hard drive also!
     
  7. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    Oh wow - I got to see one right after they were released (a local Apple geek shop) and that was an awesome device for its time. I forgot it had a 10MB HD - I thought it had two floppies too - and I think even Apple thought that was more storage than you would ever need.
     
  8. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    In some sense it is a lot. It is enough for 10 million ASCII characters. In a text only world that is quite a bit. Did they use the ASCII character set back then? I guess if they used a smaller character set it could be even more text than 10 million characters...

    Although, to put that in prospective, the Oxford dictionary has about 350 million characters. Probably no one thought it was usefully to load up a computer with a dictionary in those days though?

    I think my first computer had a 3GB HDD =P
     
  9. Telstar1948

    Telstar1948 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I don't have the Lisa anymore, but I do have a Mac PowerBook (that works) and I believe it runs at 25 Z . Don't recall what the HD size is though - bigger than the Lisa though.
     
  10. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    That's a shame, because saw on eBay they are asking $10,000 for working models - about the same price (sans inflation) that they originally cost, as I recall,
     
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