Sony VAIO Duo 11

Discussion in 'VAIO / Sony' started by excalibur1814, Aug 27, 2012.

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  1. Jorj_X_McKie

    Jorj_X_McKie Pen Pal - Newbie

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    The smoothing-tool lines were drawn with a straight edge, BTW, which seems to really make it more noticeable.
     
  2. Corticoid

    Corticoid Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I think you won't have any luck by getting another VAIO Duo 11. I got the same problem with screen flickering. It is obvious that many owners are describing the same issues and no one could get rid of them.
    I read many articles in the web dealing with backlight flickering of LED-driven (IPS-)screens, some examples of devices suffering from backlight flickering are the MacBook Pro of 2007 and the Lenovo X220.
    The reason for flickering backlights of LED-screens is the so-called "pulse-width modulation (PWM)": When not at full brightness, the backlight is naturally changing between the state "on" and "off" very quickly. It is "dimmed" by rising the amount of time between the two states (for the human eye it seems that the brightness gets lower), so that the flickering gets more and more visible by lowering the brightness towards zero.
    Whether the flickering is noticeable or not depends on the user's eyes and how the PWM-frequency is set by the manufacturer.
    Some manufacturers are driving the backlight-PWM at high frequencies so that even very sensitive persons can't see the flickering. I think, SONY chose (by chance?) a very low frequency.
    In the past, Apple could change the PWM-frequency of the 2007 MacBook Pro by releasing a firmware/BIOS-update, so I hope that SONY gets aware of this problem an will release an UEFI-update as well.
    Besides that, there is only one solution: Set your brightness at 100%, so the backlight is on all the time. I experienced as well that changing to 40 Hz can remove the flickering behavior, but I don't know why. Perhaps, PWM-frequency and refresh rate don't interfere then.
    Sorry that my (technical) english is not quite good, I hope you understand what I'm writing.
     
  3. czm2000

    czm2000 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Great explanation .

    Sent from my Galaxy Note II
     
  4. daniel frisbee

    daniel frisbee Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi Jori
    thanks for that- and yes I had started gravitating towards the line smoothing options. As my first 'pen' experience is with this computer perhaps I had unrealistic expectations... Certainly still possible to use well.

    Corticold, it would be great if a firmware upgrade fixed it. It seems weird there would not be more complaints if everyone had this flicker although perhaps I just have a particular sensitivity to it.
    I'm hoping to find another duo out in the wild to compare it to.

    Someone mentioned their pen stops working, needing to be reset by unscrewing and rescrewing the battery cap- this also happens to me though did not in the past.

    So nearly a perfect product! Dang!
     
  5. Bitech

    Bitech Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Has any found any good deals on this? I can only find open box deals at microcenter, but even there the base configuration is still $1k+ with taxes.
     
  6. sonus911

    sonus911 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Has anyone bought or physically compared the Duo to the Surface Pro? Pictures would be much appreciated if you somehow managed to get both in one room!
     
  7. pagugu

    pagugu Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Just picked up the Surface Pro for my wife this evening. Haven't had the chance to do a real comparison yet. Is there anything in particular you're looking for a comparison on?
     
  8. drew.spinnaker

    drew.spinnaker Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hello,
    First time posting.

    I would also be interested in this comparison. In terms of specifics I guess I would be interested in relative responsiveness and screen quality, keyboard comfort, digitizer accuracy/comfort, overall build quality, how they feel in your hand, and if you could only have one which would you prefer (assuming you were going to use it for work/academics).

    Thank you for any insight you can offer!

    -Andrew
     
  9. Jorj_X_McKie

    Jorj_X_McKie Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I was briefly at Best Buy today to check out that cute little Surface Pro, mostly to see what the stylus was like, how if felt in hand as a tablet, and how responsive the screen is. I couldn't tell much difference in screen quality or overall responsiveness. Both are quite smooth, but probably not quite as 'buttery' as my Note 10.1 running Jelly Bean. It was idling and plugged in to a charger and was noticeably warm--considerably more so than the Sony typically gets. In a warm climate, I think that would bug/worry me. The stylus calibration was off by about 1/2mm, but would be an easy fix, and I noticed *very* little drift at the edges. I like the feel of its tip on the glass. Overall, I think it's a great product, and I'd put it above the Duo 11, but only because of the N-Trig driver situation. If the Sony had WinTab support I would flip the rating. Both are very good. Can't wait to see what we have on the market later in the year.

    Update: Surface Pro also doesn't work with Adobe CS6 or Painter. I'm liking my choice of the Sony better now! :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2013
  10. pagugu

    pagugu Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Here's a few pics, with a few comments sprinkled in. I haven't gotten to spend much time with the Surface Pro since we got it, but I really like what I've seen from it so far.

    Side-by-side from the top while in tablet mode:
    top.jpg

    Stacked, with lower-left corners aligned, so you can see the size difference. The Surface Pro is on top. I took the picture at a slight angle, so it may look like the Surface Pro is shifted a little bit. It's not, the lower-left corners are aligned here.:
    stacked.jpg
    You can see that the Duo is significantly larger overall, and it's a difference you will notice when you're carrying them around. The Surface is a great size. While the unit is noticeably smaller than the Duo, the screen doesn't feel that much smaller despite the size difference.

    Side-view, where the Surface Pro has the Type Cover attached:
    side-with-cover.jpg
    The Surface Pro w/Type Cover attached is around the same thickness as the Duo. I figured this was a more apples-to-apples comparison to make for those of you (like me) who will be expecting to use a physical keyboard most of the time.

    Side-vew again, this time with no cover on the Surface Pro:
    side-by-side-no-cover.jpg

    Both units open, from the side, so you can see the relative depth of the footprints they require in this mode:
    side-view-open.jpg
    Just a few notes on the form factor difference, since this is something that doesn't show up in technical specifications comparisons.

    I've had my Duo for several weeks now, and after using it in a few unconventional work spaces and carrying it around a few different offices, I've really grown fond of the Duo's slider design. Putting them side-by-side like this really made me appreciate the Duo's efficient slider form-factor even more. Not only does the Duo require less depth than the smaller Surface (not to mention the clamshell designs from other manufacturers), it's also extremely stable and evenly-weight-distributed (i.e. not back-heavy like a lot of this new generation of devices). This means it can be carried around as a single unit with screen up and keyboard out with little effort and no thought. I can continue typing on it while I'm walking the unit from place to place.

    Moving the Surface has (so far) been a little more of a ritual, since when you pick it up you need to snap (or at least be wary of) the hinge and do something with the keyboard since it will just flop around if you don't fold it back. It's a minor annoyance but a disruption nonetheless.

    On the flip side, since the Surface Pro screen can effectively fold flat, you have some new screen angles you can try. This is pretty handy when you're using the device while lying on your belly, for example, as my wife often does.

    A few more pics to share in the next post....
     
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