Sony VAIO Duo 11

Discussion in 'VAIO / Sony' started by excalibur1814, Aug 27, 2012.

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  1. crazyotterhound

    crazyotterhound Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Ordered my Vaio Duo 11 from Sony's online store 12 days ago, it was shipped 2 days ago but is still stuck in Tokyo airport. Supposed to be delivered tomorrow by TNT but I don't think so. This thread has been a great source of information, really looking forward to trying out Windows 8 on it.
     
  2. falconxp

    falconxp Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Which config? Ordered one last week which is currently in production and hopefuly be delivered next week to the netherlands.

    Ordered i5/8GB/256GB
     
  3. TheGuac

    TheGuac Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Where did you guys get the sheet battery from? I've been trying to find it but no one has it. I have both the Samsung Ativ 500 and the i7 Sony Duo (got it from Abt here in Chicago), but the Samsung is driving me crazy. It seems A LOT more unstable than the Sony despite having the same operating system. The touch screen stops working after sleep if google talk is on, for instance...no such problem on the Sony. The only thing that is making me hesitant on keeping the Sony is the suboptimal battery life thus far (~4 hours). The sheet battery would help that. Thanks!
     
  4. gshocker

    gshocker Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I am also looking for a place with the battery. The sony store doesn't have them in stock and doesn't know when they will get them. The only place that I have seen them in stock is Yodobashi in Japan which is not an option for most people.
     
  5. Tams

    Tams Scribbler - Standard Member

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    The rubber (eraser) on my Wacom pen works with Reader on my T730.
     
  6. colonha

    colonha Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi everyone,

    Thank you to all the persons that feed this fórum. I'm new, but all your comments help me to decided for the vaio, now i'm happy and for me is the best gadget I've ever had.

    I buyed the model I5, 4GB Ram, 128GB HD.
     
  7. dome1234

    dome1234 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    i should have ordered earlier.... :(

    now sony store lists it as out of stock
     
  8. e-schreiber

    e-schreiber ƒ(x) / fashion Senior Member

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    Cool! Enjoy your new gadget! :)
     
  9. pagugu

    pagugu Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I also want to share my thanks to the participants of this thread (as well as the owner's thread over at forum.notebookreview.com) for helping me finally decide to buy my Vaio Duo early last week. I picked up one of the last available i7 versions at the Sony store in Manhattan.

    And thanks to the frank and detailed opinions shared in these threads, I got exactly what I was expecting, with no disappointing surprises. This was a big purchase for me, made stress-free by the good folk here, and as a result I really love it so far.

    For anyone else on the fence about this device, here's a detailed rundown of what went into my purchase decision in case it may inform your own.

    REPLACING...

    15" Macbook Pro, Fujitsu T730, HP TC4200

    PRIMARY USAGE GOAL:

    Software development / coding

    * I wanted a highly portable, stylus-enabled device that could replace my existing combination of my trusty -- but bulky -- 15" Macbook Pro for development and HP/Fujitsu for drawing. For the type of software development I do, I wanted an i5 chip and 6GB RAM minimum (with strong preference for 8+GB). This ruled out many other contenders, like the Ativ 700T and perhaps even the Surface Pro. So far, the performance of the i7 Duo has been wonderful and just what I wanted.

    * I also wanted a high screen-resolution to maximize real estate for my IDE and the Duo delivers with a beautiful 1920x1080 display. It also delivers a smooth and accurate touchscreen experience. Add me to the chorus of voices that would prefer 16:10 over 16:9 though.

    * On the down side, the optical trackpad on the Duo just doesn't compare with the excellent Mac trackpad. Today's development environments and text editing applications are still heavily mouse-oriented (read: small widgets) so an accurate pointing mechanisms are pretty important. The stylus can help offset this, but without a pen dock in the device, it's not always there when I need it. I've taken to adding a bluetooth mouse to the kit.

    * As a result of avoiding frustration with the optical pointer, I'm using more keyboard shortcuts now. And luckily, the keyboard on the Duo has been really solid. It's quite comfortable to use and has a satisfying touch.

    SECONDARY USAGE GOALS:

    digital sketching, light gaming, and portable photo/music collection

    * For sketching, I really, really wanted a Wacom pen. But unfortunately, none of the Wacom-enabled devices met the CPU/memory requirements I was looking for so I had to settle. On the flip side, I've been very pleasantly surprised with the accuracy of the Duo pen once I left Photoshop behind and started using ArtRage / Sketchbook Pro instead. It is NOT as smooth and natural as the Wacom but as a hobby artist it's not a serious setback either.

    One area where I've noticed it outperforms the Wacom is edge accuracy -- I don't know if this is a properly representative sample, but my Wacom-enabled Fujitsu T730 was sometimes frustrating as an art platform because while the pen was accurate in the center of the screen, as you went outwards toward the edges a noticeable gap between the pen tip and screen pointer would develop. This meant I had to stay within the central area of an already smallish screen if I wanted to noodle in details. The n-trig on the Duo seems to be more accurate from edge-to-edge so I feel I can use the whole screen with confidence. (for the record, my much-beloved TC4200 did NOT seem to have the same edge-accuracy issue the Fujitsu did)

    * It's been a solid gaming device so far. I'm not an FPS guy, but I've been playing XCOM: Enemy Unknown and Starcraft 2 with my daughter and both games have run smoothly using the default settings. I'm the type of guy who normally would rather play on a desktop just to get the extra graphical oomph and the Duo has been a satisfactory replacement.

    * I wanted the biggest available SSD, 256gb, with the idea of taking my photos and music with me when I travel. However, only around 170gb was actually available for use. WTF is using up so much space? Now, after installing apps, frameworks, games and source code, I'm down to 60gb free without even loading any photos or music. Bummer. I'm probably going to have to pick up an SD card for the photos and music. Thumbs-up for the full-size SD slot though. I hope it can take a 128GB card.

    WHERE I USE IT:

    on desk at work and home, on lap while sitting in bed at night watching TV, on lap on trains and airplane

    * I was skeptical when I first saw photos of the Duo's slider form-factor at work, but it has really turned out to be a versatile design and works comfortably both on a desk and in cramped train seating. This is one area where the technical specs couldn't help my decision, so I set out to play with my finalists, the Surface RT (while guesstimating about the Surface Pro experience), the Ativ Pro, and the Duo in stores before finally deciding on the Duo.

    95% of the time I want a keyboard available, so the tablet-only modes of the both the Surface and Ativ, while nice, were of limited appeal to me. I focused on judging the devices based on form factor with keyboard attached.


    The Ativ Pro has been my great hope for a laptop replacement ever since I first started looking at the Windows 8 devices a few months ago. But after finally seeing it in person, I found that the weight distribution of the Ativ Pro, while docked, was just too top/back-heavy for my liking. It reminded me a lot of my wife's HP TM2, and that is NOT a comfortable laptop to use without a steady surface for it to rest on. This unfortunate fact led me to cancel my pre-order for it and crushed my dreams of a Wacom-enabled ultraportable.

    I absolutely loved the build quality of the Surface RT, but questioned whether the kickstand design would be steady enough on my lap in the train or while sitting in bed at night watching TV with my wife. I will be re-evaluating this when the Pro comes out though, since the wife also needs an upgrade. :)

    In contrast to the two other devices, I found the Duo's slider design to be wonderfully stable. Since the screen is closer to the center of gravity of the base, it's not back-heavy like the Ativ. The flat, stable base also requires less depth to support than the Surface design w/keyboard does. I haven't tried this yet myself, but I think this is really going to turn out to be a blessing in that most uncomfortable of workspaces... the dreaded economy-class airplane seat! I am actually looking forward to it now.

    * I also really, really wanted a backlit keyboard since I use my computers so much at night. I was prepared to give this feature up, though, if there was a device that hit on all the other priorities. Thankfully, it's included on the Duo and works very well! Could it have been too much to ask to light up the trackpad buttons too though?

    IN SUMMARY...

    The need for a stylus-enabled device with a powerful CPU, lots of RAM and a large SSD dramatically limited the field for me. Then after judging form-factor and other intangibles, there really was only one choice: the Duo.

    And so far... I love it!


    OTHER NOTES/NITPICKS....

    * The build quality, as others have noted, feels very high quality. Even though the Duo was more expensive, I still just couldn't justify the Ativ Pro purchase after playing with both machines in person.
    * Screen does feel small given the chassis. If they made a 13" display version of this in a few months... I would absolutely consider upgrading.
    * Machine runs very cool and quiet even while being stressed. My macbook, on the other hand, will torch you when it gets a workout.
    * Battery life is a letdown. If they made a 13" display version of the Duo with the Haswell architecture.. OMG sign me up tomorrow.

    -Pagugu
     
  10. AbyssalLoris

    AbyssalLoris Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I have also been looking for a PC in this category (touchscreen + stylus input good enough for non-serious art, full-powered processor, portability). I had narrowed down to the Duo 11, Samsung ATIV 700 and Asus Taichi. Seeing that the Taichi is indefinitely delayed, I am omitting it.

    I am yet to try out the Samsung. But I did get a chance to play with the Sony in a Sony store. While I was happy with everything else about it, the pen function was very disconcerting. I know that many of you have found it very satisfactory and even used it for beautiful art, so it must be good. It is just that I was left with a terrible suspicion after I tried it in person. The pen input was extremely laggy. If I scrawled fast on the screen, I could literally see the line catching up with my pen trajectory with over a second's delay! I don't know if this is because of poor quality across samples or if the machine had been on forever and simply needed a reboot.

    The attitude of the Sony representative at the store certainly left much to be desired and didn't help me investigate further. When I asked for the stylus so I could try it out (I guess they keep it under lock and key), his reponse was a surly "are you going to try it or buy it"?! I wanted to say, "after talking to you, I certainly don't want to buy it".

    Anybody have any explanations for the poor performance (of the machine, not the rep)?
     
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