Solutions to the weak hinge problem?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by 0utf0xZer0, Jul 24, 2006.

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  1. 0utf0xZer0

    0utf0xZer0 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I've read quite a few complaints about the strength of the screen hinges on tablets, including that they allow the screen to flex too much for tablet use in the up position, a problem I've experienced myself with some demo models.

    So here's my two suggestions for what manufacturers should try:
    1) Double hinging: hinge both the base and screen of the tablet to connector sections. With proper alignment, the double hinging would allow the used to flip the screen around to lie flat on the bottom of the notebook while still retaining the strength of a dual hinge setup like regular laptops have. It would require moving air vents most likely, but I don't think it would be insurmountable.
    2) Screen locks: This one is so obvios I'm suprised nobody has tried it... simple take a regular tablet PC and mount the holes for extra hinges to the screen and mount retractable rods on the base... it would be locked in place like a regular laptop screen normally, but the rods could be retracted to allow it to fold into slate position.

    Hope I got the ideas across there. Of course, both would require a manufacturer to pick the ideas up.
     
  2. PYROTAK

    PYROTAK Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Screen lock is the first idea that came to mind when you said fixing the hinge problem. Its the easiest and best solution. Surprised that none of the engineers at any of the major manufactures have thought of this. Bunch of idiots!
     
  3. Hey_Flatus

    Hey_Flatus Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Watch it pyrotak.... It's not the engineers fault, trust me. The engineers does what the company wants. I'm sure the idea has been tossed around before, but if it's not approved by some bunch of administrative punks (who don't know a bit from a byte), then it's no good.

    Every time you change the place of a component, it costs big money: down time to change the assembly line and such. adding some locks might seem an easy thing to do, but (assuming that the pieces made are made by injection molding) changing the molds can cost millions of dollars.

    So yes, in theory it's a great idea, but it will never work past the ever-so-greedy companies who want nothing to hear about costs and delays.
     
  4. PYROTAK

    PYROTAK Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Yeah I guess you are right. Stupid non engineering administrators!

    im an engineer by the way. hehe
     
  5. Hey_Flatus

    Hey_Flatus Pen Pal - Newbie

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    And as you must of figured, so am I. ERTW baby!
     
  6. PYROTAK

    PYROTAK Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Hehe. I am only student and don't work in industry so I like using super fancy ways to do something.

    why drill a hole with a drill bit when you can use a laser cutter or a flow jet hehehehe.
     
  7. Widget

    Widget Pen Pal - Newbie

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    LOL :)

    ERTW indeed.

    I understand pyro. OOh plasma cutter :D

    Seriously though, my mechanical engineering degree did not teach me nearly enough about manufacturing techniques. Most of what I have learned has come from machinists commenting on my drawings and saying "WTF?!"
     
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