Should I upgrade to multitouch?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by InorganicMatter, Jan 9, 2009.

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  1. InorganicMatter

    InorganicMatter Pen Pal - Newbie

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    When I bought my Lenovo X61t last year, I went with the higher resolution display instead of the multitouch screen, thinking that this multitouch technology was an Apple fad and Microsoft would never actually do anything with it. How wrong I was. :mad:

    So, anyone used their multitouch tablet with the Windows 7 Beta yet? How is it? What do you think, should I sell my X61t and get one with multitouch? What model do you suggest?
     
  2. adam.mt

    adam.mt Super Moderator Senior Member

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    You should note that the Lenovo "multitouch" isn't real multi-touch, ie. it's just standard touch (single finger) as opposed to multi-finger touch (which only the Dell Latitude XT and HP TX2 currently support).

    The general opinion, i think, is that it''s still a gimmick at the mo. Windows 7 will no doubt bring about more PCs with a touch interface and hopefully more software too.

    It's not a bad thing to buy into for futureproofing, but I wouldn't change an existing tablet to get it. Especially since better implementations are sure to come.
     
  3. yeah-yeah

    yeah-yeah Pen Pal - Newbie

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    For the most part, true multitouch is a hardware solution looking for a problem. Gestures, while certainly on the rise, are not mainstream (yet), and I'm always (well, usually) hesitant about committing to a hardware platform based on a nascent methodology. I'd say wait a little while until mutlitouch becomes more mainstream (mainstreamier?) before spending your money.

    Just because the iphone has multitouch does not make multitouch mainstream. When my parents know what multitouch is, *then* I'll consider it mainstream.
     
  4. newsposter

    newsposter E295C + a pile of gadgets

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    Considering that laptop hardware has a 'generation' that last about 9 months, by the time there is a lot of multitouch-capable software around you'll be seeing two generations pass you buy. What kind of mobile CPUs will there be, how cheap will 512Gb SSDs be, how good will screens get, what kind of run time will batteries give us, etc, etc.

    Never buy on the bleeding edge unless you have a clear, commercial, money-making reason to do so.

    Or, as they once said in an IBM commercial;

    "Cool costs me money".
     
  5. timothyb

    timothyb Pen Pal - Newbie

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    The first signs of multi-touch on PC seem more like a gimmick, since it usually only works with bloated software. But in some cases, the screen can just be a better experience, even if using one finger. Like the HP Tx2z. It requires almost no pressure for touch. So it acts more like the iPhone in how effortless you get response. Though, I bet that type of screen is used with other tablets that don't advertise multi-touch, so maybe that point is invalid.

    I think multi-touch though is going to be a standard eventually, without it, it's like staying with a one button mouse and no keyboard for touch screens. Not talking about just gestures, but being able to hold down multiple buttons or multiple users. You've seen those MS coffee table screen designs, or how you have those touch screen walls used for the election maps or major corporations using it for research. And even gestures, in Photoshop, I'd love to be able to use three fingers up and down to adjust the brush size like a drawing app on my iPhone does.

    I've bought some remote software on my iPhone to control my PC. And the virtual keyboard, thanks to multi-touch, can act like a real keyboard, where you hold down 3 keys or more at once. And the track pad lets you do two-finger scrolling, or two-finger right clicking, and so on. Or hold down the virtual mouse button as you use another finger to move the cursor along the virtual track pad.
     
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