shorting out speakers with your own static?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Chat' started by Gautam, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. Madcap

    Madcap Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I can't find an answer to this anywhere, so I figured I might as well try here. Ok so here is the problem. When I turn the volume dial on my speakers, they get all staticky(*sp). This often times shorts out one or both of the speakers. In order to un-short-them-out, I do the same thing until the static electricity zaps them back on. I think, as far as I can tell, it happens more when I'm trying to turn the speakers down around their lowest settings. any ideas? :confused:
     
  2. Dustin

    Dustin Pen Pal - Newbie

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    turn down your mic volume
     
  3. Madcap

    Madcap Pen Pal - Newbie

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    thanks for the tip, but it didn't do anything. I turned the mic. in control panel sound options all the way down and it didn't do anything, I even muted it as well.. :(
     
  4. cochise

    cochise Pen Pal - Newbie

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    This sounds like a weird problem...I have never really heard of anything like this happening before. Have you tried using different speakers? Something may be wrong with them in general.
     
  5. Madcap

    Madcap Pen Pal - Newbie

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    The speakers that came with my HP monitor did the same thing
     
  6. McDuck

    McDuck Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Ive had this problem with my old desktop speakers in the past.
    I found the connection was the problem.. with internal speakers though I would have no idea what causes it :(
     
  7. Madcap

    Madcap Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I'll try checking the connection and see if that does anything. I can't help with internal speakers either; i've never had any.
     
  8. Brandon314159

    Brandon314159 Tinkerer Extraordinaire

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    I know this thread is probably quite old however I figured I would throw in my thoughts.

    The "dial" that you are adjusting your speakers with is actually a variable resistor (potentiometer) and when the wiper gets dirt under it (think a needle on a record) then it starts to get scratchy. If the place where the wiper runs (a resistive material) gets dirty, oily, or starts to wear out then the speaker volume control will have dead spots randomly throughout the range. (often why you see problems on the lower end where the settings are used the most).

    The easiest thing to do is cycle from high to low a bunch of time and see if you can release the dust. If not, a little contact cleaner sprayed in there (if you can get it on the actual component) would help.

    This is a common problem in older radio equipment where the volume control is really scratchy on the low end but works fine up higher where it was rarely used.

    Best of luck to you. :)
     
  9. blademonkey

    blademonkey Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I've had a similar issue with some of my headphones which had a volume control that came with it. I simply disassembled the volume control and sprayed the dial with WD40 (no joke) and it worked quite well after that.

    right after you spray the dial, you want to cycle the volume from high to low.
    let the PCB dry and it will be as good as new.

    {= )
     
  10. Gautam

    Gautam Moderator

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    Never thought it would happen to me. It did. This California Winter has static electricity galore - carpets are BAD!
     

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