Samsung S7+ Finally a worthy successor to the NotePro 12?

Discussion in 'Samsung Galaxy Note and Tab' started by stoneseeker, Aug 6, 2020.

  1. artistebot

    artistebot Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Yeh the S3/IPP aspect ratio is better. Still glad to have the S7+.
     
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  2. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    It's amazing that Samsung has this aspect of the market cornered.
     
  3. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Notebookcheck review of the Tab S7 plus below.

    I debated about posting this as while I like the level of detail they go in to with their reviews, I have some concerns about this one.

    So first of all I have no knowledge of them generally so I can't attest to their overall capabilities, though they seem at least with PCs to be pretty good.

    My problems are first of all with their WiFi testing, two issues /concerns

    1. "Nevertheless, the Tab S7+ does poorly in the Wi-Fi benchmarks, which we conduct with our reference-grade router Netgear Nighthawk AX12"

    The AX12 is an excellent overall router but calling it reference is definitely overstatement. As with all cases of interfacing one company's wifi cards with another companies routers, the performance will vary even when generally it's top tier. So my problem here is testing 101: eg if you get unexpectedly poor results, you start looking for other variables.

    In this case simply testing with another router as a comparison point would be very helpful and as illustration, we tested with Cisco access points and got one of some best results we've had so far for a WiFi 6 device.

    Additionally WifI 6 is the most advanced implementation of the MIMO protocol. And something as simple as having the s-pen docked or not can affect results especially throughput. Or for that matter even something as basic as orientation.

    2. Display Brightness- So first of all, measuring OLED is orders of magnitude more difficult than conventional LCDS. Additionally, far more than any other company, the level of software interaction with the display is very high. eg. when it detects Netflix HDR content, the software "optimizes" the display specifically for that content, that it doesn't do for YouTube 4K HDR (it uses different settings)

    Again just for reference we saw numbers as high as 605 cdm (with a custom HDR10 sample) and as low as 288 CDM (you tube 4K)

    And here, additional references as such specific parameters and multiple content sources used would be beneficial.

    Last but not least, they are one of the sites that are obsessed with PWM but without a comprehensive understanding of the complexity of how it works.

    So rants out of the way, link below.
    https://www.notebookcheck.net/Samsu...-Finally-a-great-Android-tablet.496494.0.html

    PS: don't even get me started on the way they tested GPS. i.e The Garmin Edge 500 is a consumer level device full stop
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2020
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  4. dellaster

    dellaster Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    @desertlap, Notebookcheck seems like it’s gone downhill in recent years, just as Anandtech has since Anand sold it and moved on. They’re still among the best, however, IMHO. For those of us who lack our own testing facilities, anyway. :p

    Notebookcheck in particular I keep going to because it’s the only review site that I know of that tests energy consumption (not just battery duration). And they include comparison charts that allow one to plug in any previously reviewed device, which can be super helpful.
     
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  5. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Yes Ted, I have agreed in the past ,and they were for example excellent when the various flavors of SSD interfaces started to appear.

    My point was that I do like their relatively deep dives, but I get concerned with assertions without qualification.
     
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  6. dellaster

    dellaster Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I definitely see and agree with your points. I wish there were more deep-dive alternatives for cross checking results, to get a more rounded picture. But most consumers just want an entertaining unboxing on YouTube. :vbrolleyes:

    P.S.- And I know I’m a weirdo geek. Back in the day I’d buy and read each issue of BYTE Magazine cover to cover, including ads.
     
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  7. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Could you go into more detail about this? What are the shortcomings of their testing methodology (using an oscilloscope at various brightness levels) and what method do you generally use for PWM measurements?

    (Notebookcheck)
    [​IMG]
    minimum brightness

    [​IMG]
    below 20 % brightness

    [​IMG]
    OLED flickering: above 20 % brightness

    Was there anything to call into question their conclusion that "The Samsung tablet supports DC dimming"?
     
  8. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    @Marty, easy question first. It does support DC dimming due to it being the latest generation OLED tech. however the range that DC dimming can accomplish is at best just over 20% and even that shortens the useful life of the display substantially most likely .

    Possibly getting a bit deep in the weeds , LED(OLED is a just a variant) are mostly basically binary devices eg. on or off. The way a bog standard OLED produces less output is by PWM eg turning the OLEDs on and off rapidly reducing the perceived brightness (because our eyes are analog in the respect that amount of photons over time, roughly at about 1/100 sec intervals, for average adults, is how we perceive brightness).

    Initially companies were pulsing the oLED isn the range of 60-250hz and some people can both perceive and are bothered by it. The newest displays pulse much faster 500-1000 hz or even more such that it has not been demonstabley shown that anything other than higher end test equipment can detect it. AND it takes an extremely high quality and expensive device to detect it (thus why some sites will claim that the OLED they tested doesn't have it.)

    Lastly, ever since the original OLEDs because of the pulsing people who claim to be sensitive to it, continue to do so regardless. As far as I know, there hasn't been anyone that reliably could detect it above 200hz and that is an exceedingly rare individual to begin with.

    Last but not least, there are downsides of strobing above about 600Hz including reducing panel life and reducing maximum light output.

    Likely way more than you asked for but I seem to be in the mode of writing tomes today :)

    PS: we use a custom device that we developed for the federal government to test brightness and it's definitely a one off type device and it can only reliably detect PWM up to just over 800hz

    PPS: The above is quite a bit oversimplified; for example people can detect strobing at higher frequencies of say a sold dark blue image versus a white one and when you have something as complex as a photo its even harder both to detect and to measure.

    PPPS: People with color blindness especially red/green seem to be the most sensitive to PWM for reasons that aren't completely understood.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2020
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  9. Shogmaster

    Shogmaster Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Uncle. Traded in the Tab S6 with the Black Firday deal at Samsung site. Got $500 for the S6 (I paid $550 2 months ago)! 256GB silver wifi S7+ incoming in few days...
     
  10. artistebot

    artistebot Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Shogmaster: Exciting news, look forward to your impressions.

    I have the 256gb silver model, so far so good. Did not get the Samsung Keyboard case as I found I rarely used the one I have for the S3!

    Make sure not to get a case w magnets!

    The sPen EMR screen sensor on Samsung tablets can be damaged and lose their ability to detect the pen (dead spots) with long-term exposure to the magnets in cases that feature "auto-sleep/wake" and/or simply hold a flap shut.

    Sadly the majority of 3rd party tablet cases with a cover have magnets in them, it seems ones WITHOUT a screen cover flap might be the only ones without magnets. Never the less it does seem that only the Official Samsung cases are safe in this regards since their magnets are placed better.

    IMHO I will simply remove any magnets for a case with them, or simply use one without magnets. I forgot about this issue but recently upgraded to a Tab S7+ from a Tab S3 to discover "EMR dead spots" caused by the case I recently installed. Doh!

    The case I am using the "Poetic Explorer in Navy Blue" Decent case made of rigid TPU. Still not as good as a case made from ABS.

    It has two magnets:

    1x large in the center of the back case that causes a huge dead spot right in the middle of the screen. I was able to pull out the magnet from the inside.

    1x in the bottom left corner of the cover that activates wake/sleep. I have not seen any affect on the screen yet. I will likely use a new case w/o magnets very soon

    Cheers
     
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