Samsung Galaxy Chromebook (2020)

Discussion in 'Samsung' started by Cuberdon75, Jan 6, 2020.

  1. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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  2. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Reviews are starting to appear on the Verge and others. I find this particular review a mixed bag as he as usual show some questionable bias.

    What I cant understand is the battery life and heat complaints to the point i wonder if he either got a defective unit and/or he didn't review it with version 80 or later of Chrome OS which appeared on at least our sample to have some Samsung specific fixes

    The battery life while not stellar is in line with the Pixelbook and heat wise, it has one area near the g and h keys that gets noticeably warm though not uncomfortably so when streaming hig def video

    Verge Review
    https://www.theverge.com/2020/4/6/21206151/samsung-galaxy-chromebook-review-android-laptop

    EDIT: BTW, I haven't seen much mention so far, but the Android app situation is even worse on this chromebook. I suspect that it's due to the 4k display but I'm not certain as this is the first 4k chromebook I've used. It also doesn't make total sense given that there are phones approaching that resolution so it might be device specific.

    PPS: I can't measure it yet since the tools are in our locked down office, but out of the box anecdotally the display is not very accurate. It looks more like the vivid setting on Samsung's phones. With tools it's probably fixable, but no way for me to know right now.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2020
  3. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Sorry for delayed response. I agree with you this may be the best designed convertible laptop ever, and that it dethroned the Pixelbook from that title. This causes me to wonder: why does it seem to be the case that perhaps the two best ergonomically designed and precision manufactured laptop devices of any platform ever made - the Pixelbook and this new Samsung - are both chromebooks? (Spoiler alert: I have no answer!)

    Chromeos is in some ways surprisingly capable and versatile. I bit for a used PB early and used to sing its praises as a Windows/Mac alternative. After 2 years I regret to say it is absolutely *not* a full substitute or daily driver candidate for, I would wager, the majority of regular users. There are simply too many programs it can't run and the substitutes - even those tilted the same as their "real" PC alternatives, eg, MS Office or Adobe Photoshop - are missing features, power, usability and/or a familiar UI. Since I got my new HP Spectre 360 13 I find I rarely grab for the Pixelbook, which has far better ergonomics, a far better display and trackpad and mostly faster response times than even my Ice Lake i7 HP. Even if I'm only planning to do email, Twitter and web surfing I know that 1 of 5-10 times I'll come upon a link that requires a real OS program to access properly and, frankly, the benefits, which would likely be far better with the new Samsung CB, aren't worth the potential annoyance of having to change devices mid-stream.

    Chromebooks have their place - especially for K-12 students and low-power family users - but, I'm disappointed to say, they are not the right choice for most professionals and businesses users. Even without COVID-19, and especially for $1,000+, I'm afraid the Galaxy Chromebook's fate is slow sales. Now, make the same basic hardware into a W10 PC (and add LTE connectivity) and they could well have a category-killer, even after adding $200+ to the price.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2020
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  4. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Bump. @desertlap? Curious your thoughts about chrome os pros/cons/future.
     
  5. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    @lovelaptops

    I'm watching all this and I don't have a strong sense yet. The Galaxy Chromebook is truly a beautiful device, but my sense also is that it's the answer to a question that very few are actually asking.

    The one device I am curious about and have not seen is the new Lenovo Duet. I think devices more in that form factor with an important caveat, I'll mention below, are the longer term future.

    Specifically I see that form factor being more of a threat/replacement for mid/high end android tablets like the Samsung Tab S series and potentially the most viable alternative to an iPad

    The caveat I'd put here is the latest news that Google is looking at it's own chips for devices including phones and chromebooks. We expect that these chips wont be focused on raw performance as much as battery life and connectivity.

    And that matches the overwhelming usage data profiles I've seen for chromebooks generally. I think there is a small niche market for the "price be damned I want the best specs that will look cool in boardrooms " device but maybe only one.

    So that all being said, distilling info from multiple sources, Chromebook use in general is way up, percentage wise more so than any other platform. However a significant chunk of that is K12 where there has been an absolute explosion in usage. But here again it's the more pedestrian $200-400 devices.

    The other area where we've see a significant uptick in our own customer base is shared use devices eg. sitting in common area lab or a pool of devices that employees access only occasionally.

    And now I'm looking for how Covid may change this. My initial impression is that they will gain primarily due to low cost/low upkeep inherent in chromebooks.

    In fact the biggest losers long term may be the traditional full featured OS , Windows and MacOS. I'm certain that MS see this trend already and is a primary driver of the Windows X push.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2020
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  6. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Thanks. I needed that :). Love the line "...it's the answer to a question that very few are actually asking!" I'm not familiar with the Duet, so will take a look. Great to hear from you and be nourished by your in vivo observations and analysis. Be well :hi:. Jeff
     
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  7. artistebot

    artistebot Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Nice to see some really nice Samsung Hardware. Sadly as said before Chrome OS seems to have stalled at the end of 2018.

    I don't know what to think, who is this device for?

    Is Google going give more OS support a features to really use this device? Linux full pen support....?

    Would love to have a device this nice (w EMR) for creating art, but IMHO the Samsung Tab S6 is still better.
     
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  8. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    agreed on all counts. And this would have been an awesome windows 10 device. I wonder what processes Samsung marketing and engineering go through when developing a new product. they switch design and product styles seeming at random.

    PS: In the PR fluff we got with our sample there were several "designed by Samsung with Google" blurbs.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2020
  9. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    I don't see how it matters that Google collaborated in some way in the design of the Galaxy Chromebook; @artistebot's points are extremely well taken. What enticed me to try a Pixelbook as a serious device option in 2017 was Google's then-apparent acceleration of chromeos features, support, compatability - including the Android emulation, which has literally gone backwards since 2018! I'm not much of a linux user, but was excited to learn it with the hope that this would bring Chromebooks into the world of a "real" OS. But they've completely failed to support so many standard laptop features, and OS support for software in linux - as well as in Chromebook mode and with Android apps for the past 2 years. Whether it's pen integration, video/audio capabilities, virtually everything beyond the basics of what enables one to use the device to get very basic stuff done, Google has basically been treating Chromebooks as if they were harvesting a "cash cow" in the decline of it's product life cycle, not investing in the platform, just leaving it frozen in early 2018 and reaping 100% of licensing fees to the bottom line. They may be cleaning up in K-12 but their leaving tons of opportunity on the table and destroying the brand for serious users. It makes it completely ludicrous to put such high end hardware as the new Galaxy - and many other CBs now - have when there are virtually no applications that can tap it and little prospect for that to change in the foreseeable future.

    It never ceases to puzzle me how the likes of Google, MS and Apple (Google by far the worst; no innovation, just "feed the beast"), with truly unlimited resources for the support of their platforms and products can be so apparently lazy in supporting and evolving them. Financially, the kind of things that the markets clamor for (not just TPCR-types) would cost rounding errors in their financial performance from some added resources. Sorry this is such a long post, and I'm pontificating here, but I think it is in part the result of management spread too thin to focus on all it needs to focus on. It's in par the result of the death of what we used to call "middle management," the folks who would sweat out the "small stuff," which isn't very small in terms of impact. Ok, done. Anyone left?:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2020
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  10. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Maybe someone with more industry knowledge could comment here, but of those three, Google always seemed to have a haphazard approach to their products. If I had to describe it, it would be the 'shotgun-explosion' approach to development.

    For example, looking at their successful products: Search, Maps, Gmail, and YouTube (acquisition). All these were first-mover products that benefited from viral adoption and subsequent standardization into baseline services for businesses/consumers.

    But if we take a product that followed a more 'normal trajectory' of competition and slow growth, eg. Google+/Hangouts. Google will spontaneously lose interest and killed it off, despite a promising evolution and loyal user base.

    So perhaps as a result of past successes, they've learned take the 'shotgun' approach of spraying the market with concept products, then looking the 'explosion' of mass adoption. Anything less is deemed a failure and waste of resources.

    And from the perspective of management that is used to billions of users and exponential growth, I guess this makes sense? :confused: So I guess ChromeOS could be in that slow-burn phase, like Hangouts, where it's gradually seeing iteration, while inching inevitably closer to the chopping block.
     
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