Photoshop CS4 vs CS5 speed comparison - video

Discussion in 'Software' started by thatcomicsguy, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Hi all!

    So I decided to download a trial version of Photoshop CS5 and see if the fine folks over at Adobe had worked to improve the stylus experience for Tablet and Cintiq users. I thought perhaps new efficiencies might have been introduced into the program which would elevate it above CS4.

    Boy, was I wrong.

    I made another short video of my tablet PC in action, this time comparing the two versions of Photoshop. . .

    [​IMG]


    The skinny:

    If you're working with an older Tablet, then stick with CS4. I didn't realize just how wonderfully responsive CS4 was until I played around with CS5. I think it's pretty important for people just getting involved now to realize this, if they are looking at getting a used or refurb machine to experiment with digital art.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  2. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    For the record, CS5's scrubby zoom feature almost makes the lag worth it. I used to worship CS4....but scrubby zoom has become just so valuable to my work flow I can't even bear to use CS4 anymore. Although it does require openGL, so it wouldn't work anyway on your M4 or my old x61.

    As far as the speed comparisions, I've noticed that as well on my EP121, to get CS5 usable, it required some tinkering. I noticed that if the battery mode was set to balanced or power saver, overall photoshop performance took a nosedive. High performance mode helps....but there is still a noticable lag here and there. Its weird...kind of just random lagging. Still usuable and nowhere near the kind of lag one would see using a smaller tablet like the Ls800 or Slate500...but still annoying that a modern tablet can't run CS5 too well when my old and aging x61 tablet ran CS4 perfectly without any lag.

    One thing I think may be an issue.....Maybe more so with CS5, Adobe is just really reinforcing the minimum spec requirments.

    CS4's minimum spec requirment was 1.8ghz, while CS5's is 2ghz.

    My Lenovo tablet maxed at 1.6ghz, so that incrumental requirment didn't seem to really be anymore then a recommendation as far as CS4 was concerned.

    But my ep121 is a ulv processor at 1.3 ghz....but has a turbo boosting feature that can run it at 1.86ghz....and in the case of CS5....it does seem to lean more on the requirment side.

    I think I'll try installing CS5 on my old x61 and see how it runs compared to the ep121.
     
  3. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    CS5 has trouble even on a cutting edge machine like the EP121. . ? Jeez. :eek: That suggests a bigger problem than I originally thought.

    (Either that, or CS5 was made deliberately for monster studio hardware and even a modern Tablet PC like the EP121 is simply not in the same league, nor was intended to be.)

    But then on the other hand, maybe it's an actual bug and not a result of increased program demands. CS5 is still pretty new. I noticed when reviewing my own video that the instants when CS5 stopped handling a drawn curve correctly, (Examples at 8:15 and 10:07); that it also lost pressure sensitivity and just put down a maximum-width line.

    That almost seems like a driver incompatibility issue. I wonder if there will be a patch forthcoming. . ?
     
  4. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I wouldn't exacltly call the Ep121 a cutting edge machine. I guess it would be considered cutting edge if pitted against an ipad, or an android tablet, but so would really any tablet PC. Although its certainly more powerful then all the Atom/based Slate Windows Tablets, Motion Computings J3500 kind of trumps it, and most every modern concertiable based tablet PC does as well.

    It may have a Core i5, but its a ULV model and gets its ass handed to it by a 1.6ghz Core2Duo. Not only in Photoshop, but I even did a video encoding test and the ep121 lost to my x61. It lost by a small margin, but a loss never the less.
     
  5. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Well, to be fair, I was defining "Cutting Edge" in terms of age. I confess, I'd not looked at the specs too closely, but I remain kind of surprised to hear that the Ep121, (barely five months old), wasn't designed to run current graphics software. (CS5 is more than a year old now, which means, I guess, that patches are probably NOT forthcoming at this point. . .) I just assumed, being designed Wacom enabled and having a short battery life, that it was packing more power under the hood. . .

    So you've tried CS5 on your x61? Does it run without problems? Is Photoshop all about the dual core now?
     
  6. Agent 9

    Agent 9 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Cool to see this, I got my M4 from ebay on Wednesday night this week and have been playing with it since (first impression is that it is a great machine and is far more capable than I thought it would be -though the screen seems kinda dim, and mine came with a cheap-o China 'Replavement' power supply [that is how it is spelled on the unit, lol @ their spell checker], and it has 11,321hrs of spin time on the HDD :eek: , but only a 8% worn battery [I think it is OEM, or at least close enough and it gets between 2-2:30], and everything is in great shape and works, and with the GPU fan mod and re-pasting of GPU and CPU everything stays below 50C most all the time and barely touches 69C during high use, where as when I got it it was idling at 70C [this is in Windows 7 Ult x86, I still have to try Win XP tablet edition. I wired the GPU fan up with full 5V so it sounds like a banshee out of hell but it stays cold :) ])

    I have autodesk SBP 2010, and Photoshop CS4 and CS5 installed and working, but I haven't done too much testing yet (though SBP is really nice on the 14.1" high res screen compared to my 2730p's, even if the M4 has worse viewing integrity and brightness it has an amazing size and resolution along with colors that are very vivid [they really pop]... best of all is the digitizer seems to track perfectly around the whole screen (my 2730p is one of the units that has edge sensitivity problems -it was a HP refurb, what a great job they did!)


    Well, that was a little off topic, but if you would like me to test something specific on my M4 and 2730p I can do it, you just gotta let me know! or if there are any tips or tricks to these M4's, please, let me know!



    As to the EP121, I am 100% sure the reason for its extremely terrible performance is the ULV processor. Of all my experiences with ULV processors -most notably the Tm2 w/ a C2D SU9600- I have found them to be far slower and more of a bottle neck than I would have thought they could be, I don't know if it is something architectural or if software just doesn't play nicely with it, or if there are 'gremlins in the system' but they are always underwhelming performers
     
  7. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    The thing about ULV processors...I could understand their use if they at least offered good battery life. I only get 90 minutes of battery on the ep121 which is frankly as bad as the performance. Even my old gateway C-120 had a ulv processor and it had crap battery life. I almost hate to imagine how much worse the ep121s battery life would be if it didn't have a ulv processor.
     
  8. Agent 9

    Agent 9 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    OK, now that I have had it for a while longer (and got a SSD for it), and after testing both Win 7 and Win XP tablet edition I can say that the isue you are seeing is because of Windows XP, or rather a by product of a crappy driver (I tested several drivers so far [from official Toshiba, to new Nvidia drivers with modified files] and the really old display drivers -ie: the one from 2006 on Toshiba's 'official' download page is one such driver that causes this issue very severely for me [though it is also the only driver in XP that will work with switching into portrait mode properly and keeping the cursor not inverted in portrait mode... so XP is a mess, though it has been simply flying on the SSD]

    With Windows 7 I just haphazardly put the install together when I got it (so, sofar I have only tried Win 7 on the old HDD) but everything has been working fine from portrait mode to CS4/ CS5 and so on (though I never got it to autorotate to portrait mode when in tablet mode)
     
  9. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    A computer guru friend of mine also suggested that an SSD would go a long way to speeding things up.

    I'm having some difficulty working out what I can install in the M4. I get that it's using a SATA 1 interface, and I can find data transfer rate charts, but how do they compare to the existing regular hard drive? What SSD model did you plug into your system?

    Cheers!

    ********EDIT:

    I just read the signature tag on your post, and saw that you are using a Crucial M4 SSD. Ah. Pays to read. . !
     
  10. Agent 9

    Agent 9 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    From my kinda limited understanding of what SSD's there are, is that almost any SATA SSD should work fine in the Toshiba M4 which has a standard SATA I connector.

    I initially tried the Intel X18-m (1.8" SSD) in the M4 with an adapter, but the M4 did not want to work with the adapter so I went out to Microcenter and picked up a Crucial M4 64GB SSD (great name, I know, it matches perfectly!) for $114, which is itself a 2.5" SATA III SSD (because it is designed for SATA III it is a fast SSD, but it needs a SATA III connector to reach its potential. fortunatly SATA interface is deliberatly backwards compatable so you can use a SATA III drive in a SATA I port, albeit at SATA I speeds, which is pretty much exactly how it is).


    I went for the Crucial SSD because they have always had the best reviews and pretty much top or second best reliability of any SSD while still having amazing speed, power consumption and so on.
    Plus, most of the other drives in the price bracket of $130 or less are generally not so good (the Kingston drives are the worst of the worst when it comes to mainstream SSD's, then the OCZ SSD's are best to be avoided because they may have good speeds, but they have terrible reliability because of crap quality, A-DATA SSD's are pretty low down there [sometimes these are re branded by companies and sold as 'store brand' as the Microcenter SSD's are]; Intel SSD's are another animal because it isn't quality, but cost that keep them a little out of reach, but in some ways they are worth it [great reliability, solid performance, and my favorite is it tells you the Host Writes in programs like Crystal Disk Info -the total amount of data that has been written to the drive]
    So Intel, Patriot (the higher end ones are better), Crucial, Corsair are the cream of the crop. There is a whole SSD section on NBR here Solid State Drives (SSDs) and Flash Storage which would be a good place to start when looking for info on SSD's, or for the best place to ask about what would be good.

    Yesterday I installed Win XP Tablet Edition and ran Photoshop CS5 and saw that it was a video driver issue causing the same issue of non-curvy curves in CS5 like you show in the video. Today I have just finished installing Windows 7 on it along with Photoshop CS5 and so far it seems all good, all the curves are curvy :)


    If you are looking at a SSD to get more portability and reliability [almost 0 risk of damaging the drive, even if you were to drop the thing or get it submerged], or for more speed [mostly for loading times: boot time with the SSD is right around 29 seconds from when I pull the power button to when the desktop is loaded up [I haven't tweaked anything yet], about 6-7 seconds from launching CS5 to when it can be used, and about 12-13 seconds until it is usable when opening a 288MB 7400x6120 PSD with 11 layers] then a SSD is well worth the investment of $100-something, plus it is a good opportunity to try out Windows 7 on the M4
     
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