OneNote 365 is coming to an end...

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by b52hbuff, May 10, 2018.

  1. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    Currently my office uses WordPerfect version X4 (from Corel Office Suite x4) as our primary wordprocessor, a 1999 version of Timeslips for time keeping, QuickBooks Pro 2000 for our accounting, Adobe Pro 11 for our document handling & SyncToy, which I have stopped using since I went to a two device solution about two-and-a-hald years ago. We might as well have Lotus Notes running RAM resident.
    I don't think we would have any problem sticking with the 2016 version of OneNote if it wasn't for the Samsung Note 5 (which I'm sure to be upgrading within the next model or so) and the changes that are sure to come to OneNote Android. I am assuming that it will no longer sync with OneNote 16 after MS goes completely to the cloud. My current combination is a killer application for me. I don't really want to change it. I just want the devices to keep up with power and storage upgrades in the future and for the software to work together.

    I'm sure there will be some inconvenience if we stay with OneNote 16. We put up with that with WordPerfect for quite some time. Just about everyone on the planet uses Word. So, for the few times I am involved in transactional work, like contract drafting, I have to switch to word for redlining. I can see why transactional lawyers and other users who do a lot of redlining are forced to use Word. On the other hand, where the software is isolated from the public, as in accounting and time entry software, we have just stuck with what got us here. If it ain't broke …

    In large part, we have been able to stay with WordPerfect x4 for at least a decade longer than the rest of the world (probably longer) because I have a trial practice. Nothing is better than WordPerfect and the reveal codes function for drafting pleadings. Word is far, far inferior in that role.

    I could not imagine leaving Windows and starting all over with another OS. I am wedded to Microsoft in that regard until the company makes it impossible to continue without a complete revamping of the firm's software. I guess at some point, Microsoft will stop these legacy programs from working in their evolving OS's but hopefully, by then, I'll be in a nursing home, gumming apple sauce and babbling a constant stream of mis-remembered stories of my life to the staff.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2018
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  2. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    You make a good point, however I will just make one observation:

    If you were to replace the words "Windows" and "Microsoft" with "OSX/iOS" and "Apple", or <insert any platform> and <brandname>, you get essentially the same argument that artificially divides the entire consumer electronics industry (and triggers endlessly futile flame wars across the nets). ;)

    More poignantly, I'm sure we have all been in the situation of trying to convince someone to try a tablet PC—and then got dealt the impregnable "I could never leave a laptop" card.

    The darker historian in me wonders if it will literally take an Armageddon for us to try open-source, and once we do, we'll wonder why we ever put up with proprietary nonsense. :D
     
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  3. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    And look at all the practice your getting for that with your posts in TCPR! :p

    Seriously, Bronsky, that was a really insightful and thoughtful post. I don't know what's been happening for the past 10 years, but before that WP was hanging on strong in a surprising number of especially small-to-medium sized law practices.

    My biggest takeaway from the topic of this thread is that with your mission-critical software, you almost have to choose to do what your firm is doing, and stick with the products that brung ya and still work for you, provided there is enough support to hang on, or you have to be a no-holds-barred early adopter to everything that MS tells you is "the future" (and the future is now!) I think that's unfortunate. There used to be a principal in major consumer/small business software that however you improve it you always kept it functionally (and support-wise) backwards compatible. The corollary to that was to get customers to migrate to something that has a learning curve, involves painful transitions, cuts away certain functionality or means of doing things, then you had to offer something sufficiently enticing to make it worthwhile to make the move. MS seems to be "enticing" customers with a gun to the head or, at best, a take-it-or-leave-it approach. No taking care of long time customers by maintaining "legacy" systems (they're really not very old!), no incentives to move to newer platforms other than: "it's the new paradigm" and "you have no choice."

    Personally, I think I'm the one showing my age. I was about to say "I remember when..." and then I checked my mouth to make sure I still had my teeth. :D
     
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  4. Telstar1948

    Telstar1948 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I've tried to use Outlook over the years, but every time I find it kludgy, cumbersome and difficult to sync with anything other than MS...it's like wrestling a greased pig. Once again I tried it a week or so ago, and I wondered why I even bothered! I've been using eM Client for 5 or 6 years with good results, although it isn't perfect.

    Then with the demise of OneNote 2016, and my loathing for Outlook, I thought I'd try Windows Mail (UWP) as an experiment. I put my 4 email accounts over on it (man, it's almost instantaneous setting up accounts compared to the hoops Outlook puts you through - same is said for Mail Calendar vs Outlook Calendar; Mail Calendar just works while Outlook Calendar is like trying to shoe a Yak to get syncing going with non-MS calendars) and ran through the settings. That's when I noticed how "light" Mail is. I persevered for a while, but it became painfully obvious that, while it is simple and works quite well in general, business use is not the best by any means. Too many settings simply not there to truly customize the experience for different wants & needs.

    All this is said here because this experiment gave me an insight into (possibly) how things might go with MS going over to UWP and away from legacy desktop programs - I say this because MS has had decades to build a really good light Mail program, but if you use Mail (UWP) today you may get the feeling I'm getting that dropping legacy programs (even the ones I hate) hasn't, so far, yielded anything worthwhile, if the condition of the Mail app is a prognosticator of future UWP apps.
     
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  5. dellaster

    dellaster Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    It's no secret that Microsoft intends win32/x86/x64—all desktop applications—
    to go the way of the dodo. Thurrot has been telling us for years. They might have stumbled with Windows RT, then again a year ago with Windows S, which is now going to be a mode switch instead. But their intent and direction it's pretty clear. The only question is how much, how fast.

    There will be Enterprise and organizations and others with special needs that Microsoft will service, at a price. You still need desktop Word with Visual Basic scripting add-ins? There's a Microsoft 365 tier for that, only $495 per year—oops, that was last year and it's harder to support now, in 2025, so it's only $695 per year for your tier...

    That kind of thing can be expected in the future, I think. If that's okay then there's no problem, right? :D
     
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  6. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Boy, did you ever have me on a roller-coaster! Still, really appreciate the insight.

    If only there was another alternative - other than Google, bleh, I'd switch in a heartbeat. And at this point I'm totally price-insensitive! Other suggestions?!!

    Edit: After reading @dellaster 's post, above, maybe I was being hasty saying I am price-insensitive; $495 - $695 would probably send me to G-Suite/Evernote, eventually. Then again, most of my work is pro bono these days ;)
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2018
  7. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    Being a Windows user is akin to being married in Saudi Arabia. You might desire a divorce, but you know that only death will do you apart.
     
  8. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    Sorry guys - but if you’ve been a OneNote user for years, with GB notebooks and rely on searching ink handwritten notes, you are screwed with open source or even third party alternatives. Maybe it is MS that should open source the desktop code for OneNote 2016
     
  9. Telstar1948

    Telstar1948 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Last comment on Outlook, and a correction of sorts...MS did have Outlook Express for some years. I used it in preference to Outlook back then. It was simpler to operate, set up easily without hoops, and handled calendars, appointments, contact info etc quite well...then it disappeared into the Phantom Zone never to be seen again...so MS does have some good experience with a lighter mail program...but flushed it down the toilet for reasons probably only known to them...unfortunately, I don't see any experience gained from Outlook Express in the UWP camp though.
     
  10. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Honestly, with regards to the UWP Mail (and Calendar) client, it actually does what I want from a home/personal mail client.

    Of course, at work I need more advanced features, and so there I need full Outlook.... but at home I want something quick and simple and the Mail client is that.

    ...Kind of like how OneNote 2016 is the power-user version and OneNote UWP is the simple/lite version, and Word 2016 vs Word UWP, PowerPoint 2016 vs PowerPoint UWP, and Excel 2016 vs Excel UWP. Weird how only OneNote isn't given enough resources to maintain this paradigm.
     
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