No Child Left Untableted

Discussion in 'Educators' started by Ed Hardy, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. siddhartth

    siddhartth Scribbler - Standard Member

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    There's no tech culture at all in India or Pakistan for that matter.

    People just want to become Doctors or engineers here to get above in the food chain hierarchy. They aren't interested in innovation. All they want is getting enough degrees in early life to secure a comfortable job and hope that they don't get fired, by constantly pleasing their boss.

    Most of them prefer Government Jobs, because it's hard getting fired from a Government designation. Most of the students who even get to attempt Medicals school or engineering college entrance tests in India, come from relatively well off backgrounds who do not like physical labour.

    My belief is need is the mother of invention. Indian engineers and doctors come from privileged backgrounds, they have not experienced what need and want is. So, any invention is hard to come from a person who is satisfied with the status quo and does not bother about people below him. Most of the ancient and modern inventions India is famous for, came from the underclass working people, like anywhere else. But since it's the elite who now directly control the production, invention in the Indian subcontinent has stagnated.
     
  2. kajalsengupta

    kajalsengupta Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I can see a lot has been said about education in India. I am happy to say that learners here are extremely self motivated and have found their own way of overcoming the hurdles of the system . So they are using MOOCs, mobile phones to reach the world outside. I am an online Physics teacher and have observed a steady increase in number of teachers and students in this field. Virtual classrooms are being used even in villages to spread education. Not all is lost I hope.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 25, 2016
  3. siddhartth

    siddhartth Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Do you really live in India? Seriously?
    The percentage of Indian students who have access to internet is negligible, and the speeds required to be stream a lecture video or pencast is not available to most of these "connected" children. The children who have access to your online classes are undoubtedly from very privileged backgrounds, most of them have parents who earn more than ₹40000 per month, because that is the only way one can spend on a ₹500 internet connection per month, which makes them Top 5% of Indian economic stratification. It's needless to say life changing technology in any field, be it, education or medicine, when controlled by private corporations, will never be accessible to 95% of the masses. Even when technology does trickle down to the Public/government education sector, the access to it is very limited in quantity, and mostly for Upper class and Upper caste neighbourhoods and villages. Much similar to contrast in public facilities in White and Black neighbourhoods in USA and Favellas in Brazil.

    With increasing inequalities of income, the percentage of children who have access to basic education online or offline is going to shrink even further as the incomes of their parents shrink.

    Even though statistically I am in the top 1% of India now, I don't come from the top 1% and as a man of medicine I refuse to serve just the top 1%. My skills should be available to anyone, irrespective of their paying capacity. Because access to food, health, education and law, which were supposed to be basic rights of all within our borders, but this club of rich Indians now has exclusive rights on Heath and Education. They are hiking the tuition fees of Indian Institute of Technology, Medical colleges will come next and then the Basic Sciences and Arts. Now, as a doctor trained in a federal government run Medical college which charged negligible tuition fee, i have a choice to go after the moneyed clients or serve in the public sector. But from now on, even professionals coming out of government run colleges will have to serve the top 1% to pay for his/her student loan. Talented teachers, Doctors, Engineers will be forced to join the private sector.

    I find no honour in waiting on the brats of super rich.

    That's exactly opposite of reality, most Indian students rely heavily on private run schools, then private tuitions and private coaching institutes. That's the opposite of self motivated and finding their own way. In one of the poorest of Indian states, i.e, Bihar, where I did my 12th, our school didn't have a Physics teacher, while I just used my Physics books, most of my class mates attended private tuitions to crack an exam as simple as 12th standard, and despite tuitions didn't get any government college selections. I don't see much self learning there.

    Neo-liberal = Neo-conservative right wing economic policies of successive governments have brought about alarming rate of decline in quality and accessibility of Public/Government education. Fastest of which was seen in the state of Gujarat. This is an MP from Gujarat, and from the party that hails Gujarat model as a success, has to say about the issue.
    Lack of regulation has made private coaching an organised mafia: Paresh Rawal

    More important than technology it is the Human resource that counts, and that's exactly what education system of not only India, but even crumbling public education in America also needs. Increasing pay of Government teachers more than the average income in private sector will be a step in the right direction. So, the talent comes to where it is needed, innovation will follow.
    Instead of rising numbers "internet" students, It's the availability of good teachers, specifically for students who can not afford an internet connection, that I consider a more reliable index of improvement in Education, which in layman's terms is called HOPE. And there's has been not a single long term positive indicator on that front, since very very long.
    If one comes from top 10% economic stratum and plans to serve the same 10% stratum, then things are really looking good. But for everybody else all hope died long ago. Rampant privatization is decimating those who are standing on the wrong side of caste and class divide.

    There have been few and far between exemplary teachers still giving back to the society, serving in villages and slums. These heroes are not numerous enough to reverse the long term trends, but such stories still makes people question themselves.


    For these students, it doesn't matter if their beloved teacher is in the same room as them or streams from internet, it doesn't matter if he is using chalk and blackboard or a penTablet. What matters is that they have a teacher who is willing to stand up for them, understands them and most importantly despite not so great income and ignoring other opportunities is ready to teach them. Because, he is the only teacher they have access to.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2016
  4. kajalsengupta

    kajalsengupta Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Believe me Siddarth I can see the pain, anger and frustration about the rotting system and it gives me immense pleasure to reply to what you have to say. First and foremost I also belong to Bihar ( undivided) and had the good fortune of studying there at a time when there were many institutions which we could boast of. I also feel absolutely helpless when I compare the situation then and now. I am against privatisation of education as much as you are. When we studied, the government schools in cities were the most sought after . Then the number of students kept on increasing and no new equally good schools were set up by the government. The teachers were burdened with more classes, more students and less infrastructure.The decline was inevitable and the private schools prospered. If you look at the number of learners and the amount of infrastructure we need for brick and mortar schools does it occur to you that technology can be used to some extent to overcome this?
    While I agree with you that we need superstar teachers to motivate people do you believe only money can buy that? What respect do we have for teachers in society. Ask 100 parents what they want their children to be when they grow up. Do any of them mention teaching as a career? It is not only money it is also the respect in society which matters. And what if instead of few whom he is reaching, he could be of help to many more without having to reach them physically.If you do not trust me when I say that virtual classes have reached rural India then watch this video on youtube (
    Education For Free- Virtual Classroom ). No one can deny the value of personal touch but can we afford to do that?
    I support my statement of Indians finding their own way. They may not have high speed internet on their computer but they have their mobiles. The virtual classroom providers are heavily into developing classrooms which can be accessed on mobiles. Statistics proves that percentage of Indians accessing internet on mobiles is much larger than those on computer or laptops.
    We could go on and on on this. Last but not the least, I believe that India survives because of people who still are passionate about welfare of its citizens. People like you or the teacher who I see on the video. May the tribe increase.
     
    siddhartth likes this.
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