New Krita Release V4.0

Discussion in 'Software' started by Shizaru, Apr 18, 2018.

  1. Shizaru

    Shizaru Scribbler - Standard Member

    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    392
    Trophy Points:
    76
    Krita V4 was released on the 11/04/2018 with some significant changes to the Text tool and engine, Vectors are now in SVG text is now vectors. The popup menu has been improved and includes zoom and rotation etc. Colour Masks, New Brushes, Performances Improvements (multi threaded brushes, 10K pixel max (was 1K)), Comic Management Tool, Isometric grids and lots lots more...

    Full details on the release here > https://krita.org/en/krita-4-0-release-notes/

    Download: https://krita.org/en/download/krita-desktop/ includes a portable version if you don't want to test using a full install.

    There are file format differences between versions so transportation between V3 and V4 files needs to be taken into consideration. V4 and V3 can be installed along side each other.



    [​IMG]
    New popup menu

    [​IMG]
    New Dark theme

    In Other News:
    GIMP V2.10 went into RC2 on the 17th April 2018
    Release notes here > https://www.gimp.org/news/2018/04/17/gimp-2-10-0-rc2-released/

    You can get a portable GIMP V2.10 RC1 build from https://www.partha.com/ hopefully he will release an RC2 in a few days?

    The Partha GIMP builds are handy because they come bundled with G'MIC baked in and dark theme. He also releases a portable package which makes checking out experimental/developer versions simpler. Not all of the old Animation features are included in the G'MIC provided such as the Morphing tool.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2018
    thatcomicsguy, Marty and WillAdams like this.
  2. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    821
    Likes Received:
    312
    Trophy Points:
    76
    I'll give KRITA a try - GIMP not.

    Any good tutorials on the 4.0 interface you'd recommend?
     
  3. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,178
    Likes Received:
    2,231
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Krita 4 on my Core i5 8gig desktop w/Cintiq is fine on small canvases (1024 x 1024), but drags horribly on 5000 x 5000.

    I dug around a bit and people say with a fast enough machine with OpenGL switched on, it runs smoothly on big canvases. I'll have to take their word for it. I don't know if my old Intel HD integrated GPU even knows what OpenGL is, (though I suspect it should; OpenGL is a lot older than Intel's integrated graphics tech), but I couldn't find any way to turn it on or off. And then I ran out of patience.

    For art students on a budget, (or hobbyists with ultra fast computers and whatever special sauce is required to make Krita run smoothly), then it seems like an "A for Effort" bit of Open Source code, and I encourage the authors to keep at it. It's got a nice GUI and a promising selection of tools. Hopefully they'll get their brush engine figured out at some point so that it Just Works when I load it on to my machines, where it has failed to impress every time thus far.

    For everybody else.., I recommend spending the $80 on ClipStudio Paint.

    Seriously. People are cool spending more on video games but are willing to cheap out on primary tools. CSP is a bargain, and there is no (legal) free solution in the digital art sphere which holds a candle to it.

    But you never know. With young artists, half the joy and motivation comes from their community, and maybe Krita is a fun terrain to travel through together. Dedicated professionals who have been in the game beyond their 20's tend to have less patience for inefficiency, deadlines to meet, more confidence that money spent on tools is money well spent -and they geek out over different things than the young 'uns.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2018
  4. Shizaru

    Shizaru Scribbler - Standard Member

    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    392
    Trophy Points:
    76
    @doobiedoobiedum

    Krita has come on leaps and bounds in the last couple of major releases. I haven't spent much time with v4 yet but what I have seen so far has been good and has transformed into a much more mature and solid package. Krita are bound to win over more artists on the strength of this release and with no cost barrier it's sure to attract and retain new digital artists imho.

    Sorry but I don't have any tutorial recommendations I'm afraid - I haven't watched many of the v4 videos. I'm not too sure what level of tutorial you're interested in? If you can give me some idea of what it is you would like to know I will try to provide an answer. If you're familiar with previous versions watching some of the early v4 beta release videos may help with the updated/new features. The official documentation and training resources are pretty good and well structured (not sure how current it is these days though?). They have two guides for people coming from Photoshop and Painttool Sai - glancing over those should give you a kick start. You can find them here > https://docs.krita.org/Category:Introduction_coming_from_other_software

    My approach was to simply start poking and prodding icons with a pen to see what reaction I get from them...when I get stuck I consult the search engines which for the most part ends well. Krita is relatively intuitive with smatterings of strangeness lurking within some dialogs and features, especially the more advanced stuff. Simple painting and layers etc. should be much the same as most art applications. The interface isn't as flexible as CSP, but you can easily drag dockers around and place them how you want within positions allowed. Krita supports switchable workspaces which can be accessed from the icon in the top right hand corner of the interface.

    GIMP isn't everyones cup of tea but it has its uses and does some jobs way better than other packages especially in the open source arena. For photo manipulation which was its primary function it's very capable, and the active development continues to improve its performance and functionality. Understanding the quirks of the interface and methodology of some of the work flows tends to be a barrier for people. The learning curve is steep with so many options, but well worth the effort especially if you spend time messing with combinations of photo editing merged with raster art. It's perfect for producing MEMES. :vbsmile: I can manipulate multiple images and add my own artistic/autistic additions much faster in GIMP than anything else. I'm no GIMP expert by the way I just know the stuff I need and look for guides and tips when need to learn something new. My problem is knowing what I don't know? I'm sure there are things GIMP can do that I have absolutely no concept of at all. :vboops:
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2018
  5. Shizaru

    Shizaru Scribbler - Standard Member

    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    392
    Trophy Points:
    76
    They have worked on the brush engine in Krita 4 and you can switch between OpenGL and Direct3D in Settings > Configure Krita > Display it's the first set of options on that page. They warn against stability issues if you use Intel drivers with OpenGL that option was/is also available in v3.3.x.

    You can also enable the brush instant preview mode which significantly improves the responsiveness of large brushes. You need to go into the brush editor and look towards the bottom right of the editor panel. There is a check box to enable instant preview mode. If the text is truck through you need to right click on it and set the threshold using the slider. Afaik the general improvements for brush performance isn't global it only effects brushes using certain engines. Brushes using the Pixel engine are multi-threaded giving a much better brush speed performance. You can check which brush engine is in use for a given brush in the brush editor at the top of the editor panel below the brush name.

    The developers have been doing a great job so far and they are very responsive towards the communities input from what I have seen. The future seems pretty good for Krita if they can keep up the momentum and continue to receive support from the community.

    I have to agree with your over all complaint with respect to brush lag on larger canvas sizes with brushes over 90 odd pixels which seems to be the tipping point, beyond that things get slow. The developers are aware of the issue and seem to be actively looking for ways to fix the problem. I'm sure they will crack it at some point. CSP has a better interface and much better brush performance, and as you say $80 isn't that much considering how feature rich and stable it is. There are casual users that don't have $80 bucks to spend on a graphics package. There are also very accomplished professional artists using Krita for professional projects, afaik many of them use the Linux version, which performs better over all by all accounts.

    Krita may not be ideal for large painterly master pieces but for the things I use it for it performs fine, having said that I don't tend to work on large canvases with large brushes.

    Here's a video with some info on some new brushes developed for Krita 4.



    And one comparing brush performance between v3.3 and v4 on a Surface 4.



    Edit

    I just took a look at the Krita road map and found this comment about performance surprising. We can't all have misconfigured systems can we?

    At any rate it looks like they are continuing to look at the multi core part of the brush engine at least in the short term.

    The bulk of this years development following the release of v4 will be on bug fixes and stability across all platforms.

    2019
    It is really time to do some more fun stuff with brush engines. Of course, last year, Dmitry coded up, in his spare time, the Quick Brush. That makes filling an area really fast. But it’s time to step outside the box, do fun stuff we haven’t really been doing since Lukáš spent a year on brush engines. There’s so much fun to be had!

    Link https://krita.org/en/about/krita-roadmap-2017-2019/
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2018
  6. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,178
    Likes Received:
    2,231
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Update:

    I tried Krita 4 on my new Samsung...

    No cursor lag!

    Hey, hey! Now we're getting somewhere! Gonna go play with it a bit more.
     
    Shizaru and WillAdams like this.
  7. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,253
    Likes Received:
    1,557
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Krita 4 has only two major problems: no canvas rotation gesture and no way to use the pen right click with Samsung emr.
    These 2 alone made a no come back for me.
     
  8. Shizaru

    Shizaru Scribbler - Standard Member

    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    392
    Trophy Points:
    76
    The no right click with the crippled S-pen is a bummer and no touch rotation is also a downer, although an ExpressKey or RotoryMenu set to shift+space at least allows rotation with the pen. Another approach is to use the Touch_Docker which gives quick access to some functions like rotation. It's not ideal and the docker doesn't scale well if you make it small.

    Here is what I have done to make checking out V4 easier without right click.

    [​IMG]

    I have put the docker next to the quick settings docker and as you can see the icons become unrecognisable when you scale it down to that size. It's not hard to remember what each button does so it kind of works out as a dirty fix for now.

    Losing the pop-up menu kills the Krita experience! Samsung should have an option that allows the pen to function in compliance with the Windows Ink standard. The way they have hijacked the pen functionality and broken its normal function is seriously annoying to say the least.

    It doesn't help matters when Krita hard code the command for the pop-up menu. I wonder if there is away to edit a file to change the pop-up trigger to something we can trigger with RadialMenu?

    For anyone interested that's taking a first look at Krita 4 you can use/test the Touch Docker easily by selecting the Minimal Workspace using the Workspace switch icon in the top right on the tool bar.
     
  9. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,178
    Likes Received:
    2,231
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Krita 4.2 is out.

    https://krita.org/en/item/krita-4-2-0-is-out/

    Apparently, 30 bug fixes and various improvements.

    It's easy to navigate, the drawing remains smooth even on huge canvases, and it's free!

    I noticed that it would do the finger-paint thing if I used just one instead of two fingers to pan the canvas. But that can be turned off. Good job. It's (seriously!) little things like that which make a user delete a piece of software. Having fingerpainting set on permanently is a death fault in other software! Glad to see that taken care of.

    Still no touch canvas rotation, though. That's a problem. Honestly, in 2019, in a painting program? If you cannot spin the canvas with your fingers, your software is broken.

    Also.., the selection tool needs work. The manual tells us:

    "You can release the Shift key while dragging, but it will still be set to ‘add’. Same for the others."

    That would sure be useful, except it actually doesn't do that.

    And of course, there's no on the fly toggle for selection between freehand and polygonal for when you want to lift your drawing hand for a second but don't want to have the selection area snap closed. I don't know why I bother complaining at this point. Is it so hard to duplicate the Photoshop system?

    Seriously. Don't worry so much about your super-duper HDR features and other fancy bells and whistles until you get your basic, primary tools working properly. I know it's boring. But if I can't select an area without pulling my hair out, your program icon is going to sit untouched in the corner of my screen for months until I wonder what it is exactly and then delete it.

    But that's the problem with open source stuff. Devs don't like working on boring things. Who wants to spend the time to perfect the lasso tool when it's sort of almost good enough and the kids won't know the difference anyway?

    But that's what makes a program great. Not HDR color settings; Rock solid basic features must come first, or you're strictly for the teen Instagram crowd.

    Otherwise, Krita, along with others in the pack, is becoming quite usable. Clean up the edges, and I'll look again in another year when my Photoshop subscription is threatening to renew once more.

    (Oh, I found out that I'm grandfathered into my old price scheme with Adobe. No price increase for me! Cool. The axe drop is delayed another 365 days!)
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2019
    WillAdams likes this.
Loading...
Similar Threads - Krita Release
  1. ibmthink
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    2,881

Share This Page