Need some clarification on reflowing a TX2500z (read the faq, extra unanswered questions)

Discussion in 'Hewlett Packard' started by Tiezep, Mar 20, 2013.

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  1. Tiezep

    Tiezep technology enthusiast

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    Okay, straight to the point, does anyone here know which reflow method works best and lasts longest? (heatgun vs hair dryer vs high wattage light bulb vs oven with specific information like temps and time to cook).

    Also, regarding the penny mod, I noticed one user that did one of the original threads had a possibly critical step that I have missed all these years and that I cannot find anymore info on via searching google or the FAQ. That user did the penny mod with a TX1000, and he cut out the square metal bit that originally connected to the heatsink going to the gel pad then to the gpu. When I did the mod, I never removed the original metal bit, rather, I had that sitting atop the penny connected to the gpu. This leaves me wondering, was I supposed to remove the original metal block soldered to the heatsink and have the penny take its place, or was that metal block supposed to stay intact with the penny sitting under with a layer of thermal paste between the gpu and the penny?

    I never saw significant temperature drop with stock clocks and voltages so this leaves to believe I have always done the penny mod wrong and after searching it on this forum I can't seem to find any clarification (only thing I can find is some blurry old youtube videos).

    I haven't done a reflow in a while and the last attempt I made at one literally fried my old motherboard. I recently bought another non-working mobo on the cheap and I want to this next reflow to be done right and last longer than 2 months unlike my last couple failures.

    Thank you for your time,
    - Tyler

    if these specific questions have been answered in the past, then please, link me to them.
     
  2. Tiezep

    Tiezep technology enthusiast

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    Welp, I used a heatgun that allowed 500'F at its lowest setting for under a minute (with the computer half assembled/plugged in and turned on, waving it a little from 6 inches away) and it now boots up just fine. But, when running a simple flash animation it heats up to over 90'C (with its current sloppy/quick dab of arctic silver 5 on an uncleaned surface). The metal bit on the heatsink going to gpu seems to sit flush so I see no reason to remove it like one of the TX1000 modders did.

    Anyway, if I can get it to sit below 90'C I will report back with what method I did,
    - Tyler
     
  3. freewilly

    freewilly Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I've successfully reflowed 3 GPU's and, lacking a heat gun, I used a micro torch. Used a sheet of silicon (from one of those floppy baking trays) with a relatively snug cutout for the GPU and and extending a ways around (to protect other components from heat.). Used some Arctic silver between the GPU and a flat steel cutout (from an electrical box) which laid on top of the GPU. Then, I put a little chunk of solder on top of the steel cutout and hit 'er with the torch. I 'knew' it was hot enough when the solder liquified and started to flow. Held the heat for a bit longer and let it cool down.
    I found that method on YouTube and modified it a bit (he used foil & I used silicon). I also used a piece of a cut and flattened copper compression ring used for plumbing (w. Arctic Silver). It was juuuuust the right thickness to replace that crappy heat pad HP uses. ..Willy.
     
  4. Tiezep

    Tiezep technology enthusiast

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    how exactly could you tell when the solder liquified? (what can I look for if I have a heat gun?)

    After I re-cleaned it all out with acetone/re-applied arctic silver 5 onto it today it stopped posting (again).

    I'm hoping I just didn't keep it heated up long enough and that it was a badly done reflow (first time ever using a heat gun) and that I didn't destroy anything when I opened it up today,
    - Tyler
     
  5. Tiezep

    Tiezep technology enthusiast

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    got it working again. apparently there was AS5 connecting two little bits of solder on the mobo and shorting it out.

    without re-cleaning again and simply putting the heatsink back on without adding more paste it has maxed out at 89'C running flash animations.

    guess I have to open it up and clean it out again, but I'm not doing that this weekend as I've never been so frustrated with one single computer,
    - Tyler
     
  6. freewilly

    freewilly Pen Pal - Newbie

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    The chunk of solder will look like a small cylindrical.. chunk. Then it will turn into a little 'button' of liquid. ..Willy.
     
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