Need some advice...

Discussion in 'Lenovo (IBM)' started by Youmeus, Mar 10, 2007.

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  1. Youmeus

    Youmeus Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I really could use some help here. Due to disability related reasons I can type alot faster then I can write. I am currently in college studying electrical engineering. Being an EE student, I have to do diagrams and such, so I think a tablet pc will be my best option, but I've also heard of people using a regular laptop with a wacom tablet separately. Whatever I purchase needs to last me at least 3-4 years to get me through my program. I am getting monetary help from vocational rehab to help pay for the purchase, so I'd like to get the best out there if I can. I really like what people are saying about the x60t tablet. I'm kind of torn about tablets not having alot of graphics capability but I'm wondering if this will really matter. As a student, I really don't have time to play games anyways, and I already own an xbox 360 and a desktop pc, so it's I guess I kind of answered my own question there.. As an E.E will I never need to do 3d intensive computer work? Can I at least run something like mathmatica? I guess for those that did purchase an x60t, would you do it again? If I do go with an x60t tablet, what screen should I get. I feel like the higher resolution would be beneficial, but it sounds like the touch screen option would be useful, but I'm not really sure what for yet? I am going to talk to my liaison for VR services on Monday and I need to talk about what I am interested in. I don't want to sound hesitant on the x60t, as I think it's just what I need, but will it last me? and will I be disappointed if they come out with a core 2 duo version in a few months? Is the processor difference worth the wait? Since I am not going to be playing 3d intensive games will a core 2 duo matter in the long run? So many questions and I am hoping some of you guys had the same questions and could give some logical reasoning behind your decisions for choosing or not choosing an x60t laptop

    Sincerely,

    Matt
     
  2. P8RSON

    P8RSON Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    It was a little difficult reading your message Matt.
    A few new line sentences and the odd paragraph would have made it easier to read and come back to find that particular question you were asking.

    Anyway, to answer some of your concerns:-

    The x60 is indeed a very good Tablet PC and with it's dual touchscreen/Active screen makes it a fine contender for anyone with any disabilities.

    Although the graphics chip is not what you would find in a high end souped up PC, you should however be able to play most games including some FPS with some settings turned down.

    The price to pay here though is in ensuring your machine has enough memory.
    1GB RAM should be an absolute minimum and if you intend to run Vista then ideally this should be 2GB.

    As to will the machine last 3-4yrs...
    Machines today are built very well and the hardware should last well.
    However, as software dictates hardware sales, 3-4yrs may tax even today's high specked machines.

    I am sure though that the x60's processor is of the 'socket' type, meaning you should be able to slot in a Core 2 Duo but I would doubt the Motherboard would be configured for anything higher when the processors are released.
    But then again... depending on what you will use the machine for, the standard Core Duo should suffice.
     
  3. homer007

    homer007 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    X60 should be fine for EE. I never had to really do anything that required graphics work as a EE. I would think about getting the high-res screen because if you have to do any coding or even just work with multiple windows as I often found myself doing, high res is super helpful. The computer should def last you through the program. And the processor is more than adequate for whatever you should be running.
     
  4. Youmeus

    Youmeus Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I apologize for the paragraph structure, I usually write much better, but I guess I was in a hurry. Been to busy researching tablets, rather then working on my physics homework.. Just getting into electric fields now.. fun fun! :eek:
    I am definately leaning toward the higher resolution screen. It looks like the lenovo site says that wide viewing angle is available on the SXGA+ screen. I was worried if without it, I wouldn't be able to see the display if I laid it flat on the table to write on.
    As to upgrading the CPU, your saying that the Core 2 Duo is pin compatible with the Core Duo? I would just need to possibly use a L.V. version?
    I was eyeing the Fujitsu lifebook T4215 tablet as well but it appears to be even more expensive, albeit offering a few more options including the core 2 duo.

    Matt
     
  5. Sassafras

    Sassafras Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I would recommend the Fujitsu tablet as I own a Fujitsu slate. Their customer service reputation is excellent and, as you say, they give you more options, which you may find beneficial if you want to keep a tablet for three to four years. From what it sounds like, both models will meet your needs for how you will be using your tablet. Vista is going to be around for the next four years at least, so any software should be compatible and by having core duo, it should be fast enough for your needs.

    I am running a 1.1 GHz Pentium M. processor in my slate. I am not finding any issues running note taking software or mathematical software.
    (I am doing and economics graduate degree.) For writing mathematical equations, drawings, graphs, etc. having a Tablet PC is excellent. You can color code your graphs and notes without having to have multiple pencils and pens, which I find extremely useful. I wish I had something like this when I was doing my chemistry undergraduate degree!

    In addition, Fujitsu has a good battery life. I can get close to five hours on my slate. Though more expensive, I recommend a slate if you will be using the computer in tablet mode the majority of the time. With voice recognition you can chat without having to type and you can dictate to word or outlook also. I am writing this reply with voice recognition. Pretty darn handy! But if you're engineering software requires a CD ROM drive to run your program, then a convertible is what you're going to have to look at.

    -Sass
     
  6. arobulack

    arobulack Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hey Matt, I'm struggling with the exact same issues. I found a (very long) article at AnandTech very helpful in dispelling some of the hype around the Core 2 Duos.

    On top of the question of performance I've begun to explore the issue of heat. I've read several reviews and blog postings now that comment on how heat in the ULV Core Duos (in the X60 and the Toshiba R400) isn't even noticeable, even after extended periods of use. However, there are many comments regarding discomfort associated with the Core 2 Duos (I myself have bad heat experiences with a regular Core Duo).

    So it's not just a speed issue, for me at least, it's also about the total user experience.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  7. arobulack

    arobulack Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Matt,

    here's an interesting blog post for your perusal:http://blogs.zdnet.com/Orchant/?p=375

    Interesting to note that Orchant's comments regarding heat contradict much of what I've read to date.
     
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